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Sep 3, 2015







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A sad goodbye


09/03/15



 
We lost a friend Sunday night. Denise Roberts, a longtime Union Leader sales rep, friend and friendly competitor, was shot and killed in Manchester as she was out walking. Not much more is known right now. 
We are in shock that this could happen in New Hampshire to anyone, especially Denise, who was such a kind person. 
Media sales is a tough business. But in her long career, Denise kept a smile and a genuinely great attitude. Denise first starting working in ad sales in 1983 for George and Dee Little, who published the Goffstown News and other weekly newspapers around Manchester. That company was purchased by the Union Leader in 1993 and headed for a time by our very own Jeff Rapsis. 
But you didn’t have to be a co-worker to know Denise. She was everywhere in Manchester — a constant figure at local businesses, running in to get ads or see about changes. 
We’re heartbroken and will miss her dearly. We extend condolences to her many siblings and family members, and to all who knew her, worked with her and appreciated her. 
Manchester Crimeline is offering a $7,500 reward (with the help of the Union Leader Corp.) for information that leads to the capture and conviction of the person or persons responsible. If you know of anything, please call 603-624-4040. All tips are anonymous.  

A new path for our power
Though it’s getting cheaper to install solar panels, New Hampshire utilities are nearing their cap for accepting power generated at people’s homes. This is also called net metering, and it’s one of the huge draws of people adding solar panels. It allows people to “sell” excess power when the sun is shining to the power grid. In New Hampshire, the total amount that the utilities are required to buy is 2 percent of the power used in the state. Massachusetts allows about 4 percent of its power to be created by “independent power generations facilities”— your home’s solar panels. 
These caps exist for good reason. The grid is expensive to maintain and selling power back to the grid doesn’t help defray the cost of maintaining that power grid that all users (even those with solar panels) need. 
It is a balancing act to both encourage heavier use of solar power and maintain the grid, just as it is with using the gas tax to pay for roads when more cars are not using gas to drive those roads.
The New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission should get ahead of these coming changes and create a new way to pay for the grid while also increasing the amount of power the utilities must buy back from consumers with solar panels. 

 






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