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Feb 20, 2017







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Object Collection, cheap&easy OCTOBER (Infrequent Seams Records)

I’m sure there has to be a handful of New York City transplants of temporary or longer stripes reading this paper who’d literally kill for the briefest whiff of wingnut performance-art, and since I’m a people-pleaser by nature I’ll humbly attempt to oblige by mentioning this record, recorded live at LaMaMa in the East Village in 2015. Written by Kara Feely with music by Travis Just, this is a busily chaotic set of verbal and musical non sequiturs, allegedly revolving around “interviews about the aftermath of the Gezi Park Protests in Turkey and Trotsky’s ‘History of the Russian Revolution.’” Like most examples of this genre of expression, however, it’s more a cry of psychic outrage from a platoon of artistically distressed folks who’ve taken far too many subway rides, not that this show seems like it’s easy to pull off. There are speed metal drum parts, noise-rock passages, et cetera, but above all a lot of scenes of people talking over each other and/or in unison. The closing track’s frantically spat libretto, probably copied verbatim from the rantings of a fed-up Turk, pours on the universal political profundity, with epithets like “they see rainbows as they drown.” I like that stuff and all, but really, does anyone honestly think this species will ever learn? A — Eric W. Saeger 





Trevor de Brauw, Uptown (The Flenser Records)
CD Reviews: February 16, 2017

02/16/17



Trevor de Brauw, Uptown (The Flenser Records)

Been a while since we indulged in some guitar-god self-indulgence (actually, have we ever?), that is, if you consider this dude to be a god of any sort. His resumé includes the first Pelican album, so I suppose that sort of counts, but look at me, spoiling all this with pedantry while you wonder, probably out loud, when I’ll get to the point and describe what this is. No problem, to wit: drone. Tons of drone. Hearing-test drone, heavy machinery drone, Sunn(((O))) drone, all kinds of drone. Once in a while, just to remind the listener de Brauw’s a guitarist and not Snoopy playing piano, he sinks a riff chin-deep into this muck, which provides the sort of relief that groovy “Relayer” part does in Yes’s Tales from Topographic Oceans, an album which, while we’re on the subject of self-indulgent noise, caused Rick Wakeman to quit Yes. Quitting a one-man band isn’t an option unless in serious cases of split personality disorder, and so on drones de Brauw, the final song a changeup that sports a riff worthy of Stryper. I’ve never understood why someone would consciously choose to buy an all-drone record when they could simply lay down next to a 1973 Nova with a bad muffler, but taste is taste I suppose.





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