The Hippo

HOME| ADVERTISING| CONTACT US|

 
Jan 18, 2018







NEWS & FEATURES

POLITICAL

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS

MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

POP CULTURE



BEST OF
CLASSIFIEDS
ADVERTISING
CONTACT US
PAST ISSUES
ABOUT US
MOBILE UPDATES
LIST MY CALENDAR ITEM


David Warner, M.R. James’ Casting The Runes (Cadabra Records)

Funny that this one should pop up a few days after I’d been listening to some old BBC-produced, Christopher Lee-read Montague Rhodes James stories on YouTube. During the late 1800s and early 1900s, James was England’s premier spinner of ghost stories, and it’s been my habit for a few years now to read them around Christmas time. They’re wildly spooky, quite a bit like H.P. Lovecraft but more steeped in what you’d call traditional ghost themes; James’ tales — about witch-haunted trees, living pictures and things — were first told to his King’s College students, who’d gather around his fireplace at Christmas. A few months ago we’d discussed this company’s vinyl version of Dracula, and this is yet another terrific followup (they’ve also done some Sherlock Holmes stories as well as Charles Dickens’ ghost story The Signalman), another limited vinyl run featuring 30 minutes of acclaimed actor David Warner speaking the roles tangled in this eerie account (later adapted in the 1957 film Night of the Demon) of a cursed occultist. Really looking forward to what these guys will do next. A+ Eric W. Saeger




Art Feynman, Near Negative (Western Vinyl Records)
CD Reviews: January 11, 2018

01/11/18
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



 Here We Go Magic leader Luke Temple is still a quick and effective worker, having kicked off this project in July by releasing the full-length Blast Off Through the Wicker, followed now by this EP. Historically, this Salem, Massachusetts-raised painter-gone-musician has tendered rare examples of charming weirdo-pop, emphasis mercifully on the pop, and here he goes all the way back to his roots, slapping this EP together on a four-track recorder, which technically should only mean there’s a bit of signal loss when the recording is taped. In a primer on the advantages of working with such rudimentary studio gear, this six-songer opens with “Shelter,” a rainy, urban, chilled-down cross between Prince and 1970s-radio whiz-kid David Essex; it’s old-school ’80s and bleeding-edge tech-pop at the same time, quite brilliant. Another stripped-down but not lo-fi chestnut, “I’ll Get Your Money,” combines Calexico with Vampire Weekend. I dunno, to me, this guy is a (relatively) unsung modern version of Nick Drake, and he just gets better and better. A — Eric W. Saeger

 





®2018 Hippo Press. site by wedu