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A completed Grilled Halloumi and Roasted Tomato Salad recipe made from a meal kit in Local Baskit’s Artisan line. Photo by Carrie Turner.




Local Baskit

The full website with ordering availability is projected to launch Saturday, June 18, at localbaskit.com. The first orders will be ready for pickup or delivery the week of June 26. Visit the website now to sign up for email updates. More information and photos of the meal kits are available on facebook.com/localbaskit and instagram.com/localbaskit. 




Dinner is ready
New Hampshire gets a meal kit service of its own

06/16/16
By Angie Sykeny asykeny@hippopress.com



 Imagine having all the ingredients you need to make a delicious, healthy meal, picked up fresh from local farms, pre-measured and delivered directly to your door in time for dinner. It may sound too good to be true, but it’ll be a reality in New Hampshire with the launch of Local Baskit, a new meal kit service customized for the 603 lifestyle.

“The concept is taking the food industry by storm,” said Beth Richards, Local Baskit founder. “It gives the person who wants to support local farms that convenience of not having to think about what to make for dinner.”
Meal kits have been a growing trend since companies like Blue Apron, HelloFresh and Plated launched in the U.S. in 2012, but until now, people in New Hampshire haven’t been able to experience the full benefits.
“I was an early customer of one of those national companies, and it always bothered me that they would say ‘local, fresh ingredients,’ but it would take three days to get to me, and the closest food source I could find on the label was in Wisconsin or something,” Richards said.
There were other problems too; as someone whose job at the time required a lot of traveling, Richards found that the service’s lack of customizable meal kit options and limited delivery days for New Hampshire weren’t convenient at all.
That’s when she had the idea to start a meal kit service just for New Hampshire with ingredients that were truly local and fresh, with special features that cater to New Hampshire’s unique demographic. She’ll begin taking orders Saturday, June 18.
 
Baskit basics
Local Baskit is operated by Richards, her husband and a photographer who photographs the meal kits for Local Baskit’s website, social media and recipe cards. Though it’s based in Concord, most of the assembling, packaging and shipping process will take place at Genuine Local in Meredith, a food production facility that provides work space and guidance for small and startup food businesses. Subscribers place their orders via the Local Baskit website.
All ingredients used in the meal kits are produced in New Hampshire or New England.
“Folks within the farm community have been really generous in sharing their knowledge and helping me craft this,” Richards said. “The drivers for the recipes are what the farmers tell me is coming off the fields. … It’s another version of farm-to-table, only you’re cooking it at home.”
Local Baskit is currently sourcing produce from Moulton Farm of Meredith, Vegetable Ranch of Warner and Brookford Farm of Canterbury, and meat from The Local Butcher of Barnstead. It’s also partnering with New England seafood purveyor Sal’s Fresh Seafood of Meredith and a distributor of various New England-sourced foods, Dole & Bailey of Woburn, Mass.
 
What’s for dinner?
Local Baskit offers three product lines with five recipes in each to choose from.
The Artisan line is designed for the adventurous foodie and features creative meals with high quality meats and seafood and unique ingredients, like a cod recipe with walnut oil vinaigrette or grilled halloumi with a roasted tomato salad.
The Fresh line is geared toward families and features more kid-friendly ingredients and simple preparation. Recipes will include things like fajita-spiced quesadillas, pizza pasta chicken and crockpot comfort food.
The Simple line features the same recipes as the Fresh line, but without the meat. This is a good option for people looking for a lower price point, a vegetarian alternative or to use their own meats and fish.
Each meal kit comes with a recipe card that includes detailed step-by-step instructions with photos and information about a local farm or food artisan where some of the ingredients came from.  
The recipes will be different each week and are developed by Richards and other guest contributors. The first week includes recipes from New Hampshire food blogger Susan Nye. Subscribers can opt to receive two, three or four meals a week in two-person or four-person servings. The two-person servings are adult portions while the four-person servings include two adult and two kid-sized portions to accommodate families. Weekly package rates range from $18 for two two-person Simple meals to $138 for four four-person Artisan meals.
“The prices are a little more, but you’re still saving … by cutting back on produce waste,” Richards said. “You get a whole bunch of kale for a meal and have to figure out what to do with the leftovers, but instead, I’m giving you the exact ounces you need for a yummy kale turkey sausage pasta recipe.”
 
Get it to the table
When subscribers place their orders online, they’ll be given a choice of how they want to get their meal kits, either through delivery or pickup. One-day delivery is available anywhere within the state with four delivery days to choose from. Local Baskit is partnering with eco-friendly packaging company Good Start Packaging of Bedford to ship the meal kits in recycled cardboard with biodegradable portion cups and bags for the ingredients.
Subscribers can also arrange to pick up their meal kits at the Bedford Farmers Market, the Manchester Farmers Market, the Open Air Market of New Hampton or Cole Gardens in Concord. 
“It’s highly probable that I’ve gone to the local farms that morning and grabbed the produce, packed it, and someone’s picking it up that night at the farmers market,” Richards said. “That’s a really huge difference, and people can pick up their strawberries and things from other vendors while they’re there, so it’s really promoting that 603-focus and food love.” 





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