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Sep 20, 2018







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The Scenic Session by 603 Brewery is an excellent summer time IPA. Courtesy photo.




 What’s in My Fridge

Steel Rail Pale Ale by Berkshire Brewing Co.: I was recently at a wedding in western Massachusetts where the Steel Rail Pale Ale was on tap — rejoice. As I went to college in western Massachusetts, this was a regular choice of mine. It had been some time and it was pleasing to make its “reacquaintance.” Flavorful, refreshing, hoppy but not too bitter and entirely sessionable. Cheers!  




Drink these beers now
Five brews to enjoy

09/12/18



 My wife went to a local liquor store a couple weeks back and couldn’t find Samuel Adams Summer Ale. That was all she wanted, just some “Sam Summer” on a hot beach day. But there was no more Sam Summer. She asked, to her credit, “Is it because you’re already putting out pumpkin beer?” The manager laughed and informed her he had Octoberfest beers in the back that he couldn’t, in good conscience, put out yet. I’m glad they shared a laugh, but laughs don’t turn into Sam Summer. 

Aside from the fact that the first official day of fall isn’t until Sept. 22, I’m fairly certain it was actually 1,000 degrees just last week. I still want to drink summer beers and I think you should too. No self-respecting New Englander was drinking Octoberfest or other fall beers last week. 
That’s one of the things that’s great about the craft beer movement. Craft brewers can be a bit more nimble than industry giants. I’m not about to take shots at the big guys; the reality is that they’re brewing for a much larger national audience than your local neighborhood brewer, who can actually wait to introduce beers until it’s seasonally appropropriate. That means your local craft brewer is still treating it like it’s summer, whereas larger-scale producers like Samuel Adams are making the transition to fall.
As we begin to make the transition from the summer drinking season to the fall drinking season, here are five New Hampshire brews to help summer linger:
 
You Can Get Wit This by Stoneface Brewing Co. (Newington) 
Stoneface calls this its “perfect warm weather beer,” and it’s highlighted by big citrus flavors stemming from the addition of blood oranges. The orange flavor lingers on this 4.8-percent ABV witbier. I give you permission to have a couple. 
 
She Sells Seashells by Throwback Brewery (North Hampton)
I’ve actually seen people add a little salt to their beer, usually a Bud Light or something along those lines. I never quite understood what was going on there but this salted and dry-hopped blonde ale is particularly intriguing. Salt enhances flavor, right? Throwback suggests pairing this with salads, roasted chicken, seafood and goat cheese. 
 
Scenic Session by 603 Brewery (Londonderry)
One of the things that has made IPAs so popular is that you can drink them all year-round, on the hottest days and on the coldest days. I find session IPAs to be the perfect antidote to a late summer day. 603’s Scenic Session is a New England style IPA, so you get that haziness and that juiciness in a little lighter package. 
 
Kapitöl Kölsch by Concord Craft Brewing (Concord)
A Kölsch is always a fit for a hot summer day: clean, light, crisp and refreshing. This golden ale, which comes in at 5.3-percent ABV, has a subtle sweetness and a smooth finish that begs to be enjoyed at the beach. This is easy drinking at its best. 
 
Pompadour by Resilience Brewing, Schilling Beer Co.’s American Ale Project (Littleton)
If I had to name my favorite New Hampshire brew, I think this would be my choice. Beyond my personal affinity for it, it’s a perfect summertime pale ale characterized by brilliant citrus and peach flavors. This is wonderfully complex — hoppy enough to please “hop-heads,” but entirely approachable. At 5.6-percent ABV, I invite you to have more than one. 
Jeff Mucciarone is a senior account executive with Montagne Communications, where he provides communications support to the New Hampshire wine and spirits industry. 





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