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Jul 22, 2017







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Pre-Civil War Manchester walking tour

When: Saturday, July 15, 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Tour begins at 88 Lowell St., Manchester, and will travel on Lowell, Walnut, Bridge, Union and Beech streets
Cost: $5 for Manchester Historic Association members and $10 for non-members
Visit: manchesterhistoric.org




Going down in history
New walking tour explores earliest days of Manchester

07/13/17
By Matt Ingersoll listings@hippopress.com



 If you’ve ever wondered about the most notable people and places involved in shaping the early history of the Granite State’s largest city, a new tour offered by the Manchester Historic Association will provide some answers.

This will be the first walking tour the association has ever given on Manchester’s history pre-dating the Civil War, and before it was incorporated officially as a city. Local historians John Jordan and Dick Duckoff will lead the tour, which will begin at the intersection of Lowell and Chestnut streets on Saturday, July 15, at 10 a.m.
“We’ve done Victorian history tours from about the 1870s to the turn of the century but a pre-Civil War tour has never been done before,” Duckoff said. “The first mill actually opened here in 1838, so it’s fascinating that there were people living here even before the war.”
Duckoff said the years between the opening of the first mill and the incorporation of Manchester in 1846 is when Manchester was known as the “New Village.”
John Clayton, executive director of the Manchester Historic Association, said the tour centers around a relatively small focal point of the city — namely the neighborhoods surrounding Lowell, Walnut, Beech, Union and Bridge streets, which are all within three to four blocks parallel or perpendicular to each other. The people who lived there in the 1840s and 1850s had significant roles in the city’s expansion.
“A lot of people in those days lived in rather modest homes in the downtown area … and they made a fortune constructing some of the more impressive parts of Manchester. A lot of that will be discussed on the tour,” Clayton said.
According to Duckoff, the tour will discuss the lives of the wealthiest people who lived in that area at the time, including Frank P. Carpenter, who would go on to become president of the Amoskeag Paper Mills; Abraham Olzendam, owner of the A.P. Olzendam hosiery mill; and Daniel Clark, a Stratham native who served as a U.S. Senator from New Hampshire during the years of Abraham Lincoln’s presidency.
“There lived three future mayors, a U.S. representative and a U.S. senator, all basically within a three-block area of each other,” he said. “Aretas Blood, who was probably the wealthiest individual in the whole state at the time, lived there as well. … He was the person in charge of manufacturing locomotives and fire engines at one time.”
At the time, Manchester went no farther than Orange Street, according to Duckoff. But many of these people who lived in the New Village thrived in the business of buying and selling land that ultimately expanded to many of the northern neighborhoods of the Queen City we know today.
“The interesting thing is that Manchester’s history largely depended on these people,” he said. “If they lived anywhere else, the whole city could be very different, and that’s why this early tour is so fascinating.”
The tour is expected to run until noon and is one of several the Association has held to highlight important people, landmarks and periods of the city through the Amoskeag Manufacturing Co.’s role in shaping it.
“There were so many extraordinary individuals involved with the Amoskeag company that if you focus on the people, the stories never end,” Clayton said.





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