The Hippo

HOME| ADVERTISING| CONTACT US|

 
Nov 24, 2017







NEWS & FEATURES

POLITICAL

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS

MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

POP CULTURE



BEST OF
CLASSIFIEDS
ADVERTISING
CONTACT US
PAST ISSUES
ABOUT US
MOBILE UPDATES
LIST MY CALENDAR ITEM


Courtesy photo.




5th annual Somersworth Indonesian Fair

When: Saturday, Sept. 9, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Where: Memorial Drive, Somersworth
Cost: Free admission; food is priced per item
Visit: indonesianconnect.org




Island feasts
Somersworth Indonesian Fair returns

09/07/17
By Matt Ingersoll listings@hippopress.com



 The seven largest regions of Indonesia — Papua, Sumatra, Maluku, Sulawesi, Kalimantan, Bali and Java — will be represented through authentic food at the Somersworth Indonesian Fair on Saturday, Sept. 9.

“All of the foods come from these different islands, and every island has a taste,” said Raude Raychel, president of Indonesian Community Connect, which organizes the fair each year. “There are some [dishes] that are sweeter, and some that are spicier.”
The event, which also features live music, dancing, crafts and a parade, is happening for a fifth year and is free to attend. Formerly known as the Jakarta Fair (named after Indonesia’s capital city), it was originally held closer to Indonesian Independence Day on Aug. 17 but was recently moved to early September.
Food vendors from Maryland, New York, Rhode Island, Connecticut and the Boston area, in addition to several in New Hampshire, will gather for the fair.
Raychel said popular food options include nasi kuning, a yellow rice dish cooked with coconut milk and turmeric, rendang, a spicy beef curry dish, nasi lemak and nasi uduk, a coconut rice combo served with either meats like fried chicken or vegetables, and lemper ayam, a rice and chicken dish wrapped in banana leaves.
If you’re new to Indonesian cuisine and don’t know where to start, Raychel recommends the chicken, beef or pork sate, which is served with all different kinds of sauces and spices, depending on its region of origin.
“Sate is the same thing as like any kind of skewered meat, but the Indonesian versions have a lot of their own special spices to them that make them taste a lot different,” she said. “You can go to any city and get chicken on a skewer, but ours is more rich in different flavors. … The chicken one is always served with a peanut sauce, and the pork sate can be made with a sweet soy sauce.”
Specialty desserts and drinks that highlight different islands, like es teler, a fruit cocktail made with coconut milk, sugar, avocado, cincau and other jackfruit, will also be available. Visitors can either purchase food to eat on site or get it to go, according to Raychel.
In addition to the food, several craft vendors will have booths set up to showcase Indonesian batik, a traditional type of dyed fabric, as well as language exchange booths and a batik costumed fashion show.
There will also be live music throughout the day from Boston Collaborative Musicians, AJ & the Lads, and other contemporary performers who will be demonstrating instruments of Indonesian origin like the angklung and the kolintang, and traditional dances from the island of Papua.
New to this year’s fair will be an Indonesian cultural parade down Memorial Drive, which will feature authentic costumes from communities all across the archipelago nation.
Raychel said the fair is all about educating the public about Indonesian culture through its food, crafts, music and other traditions. 





®2017 Hippo Press. site by wedu