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Jun 23, 2018







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 70th annual Lamb Barbecue & Food Festival

When: Saturday, June 16, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Where: St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, 1160 Bridge St., Manchester
Cost: Free admission and parking; food is priced per item
Visit: stnicholas-man-nh.org




Lamb a-skew
Lamb barbecue and Greek food festival returns

06/14/18



 By Matt Ingersoll

mingersoll@hippopress.com
 
Hand-cut lamb cooked and marinated on the skewer is the main draw of one of the longest-running Greek food festivals in the Granite State, returning to St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church in Manchester for the 70th year.
The annual Lamb Barbecue and Food Festival, to be held on Saturday, June 16, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., is smaller in comparison to other similar events like Glendi. But co-organizer Paul Keriazes said it’s still a big community effort; church members work to remove the gristle and fat of the lamb by hand, cubing it and marinating it the day before to ensure the strongest flavor.
“We debone and marinate the lamb using George Moulis’s famous recipe. He was one of the co-founders of the church who recently passed away,” Keriazes said. “The nice thing about having a smaller event like this is we are able to cook to order, so it pretty much goes right off the skewers and onto your plate. It doesn’t go under any heating lamps.”
The late George Moulis’s grandson Michael even built the six-skewer barbecue grill that will be used during the festival, Keriazes added. Lamb souvlaki and lamb burgers with tzatziki sauce will also be available using the meat cooked on the skewer.
“Because of it being the 70th anniversary, we’ve been trying to step up the festival a little bit,” Keriazes said. “We’ve increased the lamb production, and this year adding a bigger tent for some live entertainment.”
In addition to the lamb, other food staples at the festival will include dolmathes (stuffed grape leaves), a Greek lasagna dish called pastitsio, loukanikos (Greek sausages), spanakopita (spinach pie), meatballs, hot dogs and several assorted side dishes, all prepared by members of the church in the weeks leading up to the event. Keriazes said all items can be ordered either a la carte or as dinners, which come with rice pilaf, green beans, a salad and bread. If you can’t stay for the festival, take-out is also available.
A variety of Greek pastries are served as desserts, all of which are baked by church members throughout the week prior to the festival. They’ll include baklava, whoopie pies, finikia (date-stuffed cookies dipped in syrup), kataifi (cookies with shredded phyllo dough, dipped in syrup and rolled around a sweet nut center), koulourakia (Greek butter cookies), kourabiedes (Greek shortbread cookies with powdered sugar), and loukoumades (fried dough balls topped with honey).
From 2 to 6 p.m., the Greek-American dance band Ta Pethia will be performing, and the festival will also feature costumed dancers performing “The Sons & Daughters of Alexander the Great,” various items to be raffled off such as gift certificates, T-shirts and jewelry, and a children’s area with face-painting, games and more.
Keriazes said about 25 percent of the proceeds from the raffles and food items go toward local charities, with the remainder benefitting general maintenance of the church. 





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