The Hippo

HOME| ADVERTISING| CONTACT US|

 
Dec 18, 2014







NEWS & FEATURES

POLITICAL

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS

MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

POP CULTURE



BEST OF
CLASSIFIEDS
ADVERTISING
CONTACT US
PAST ISSUES
ABOUT US
MOBILE UPDATES
LIST MY CALENDAR ITEM






Local Color


09/09/10



• Art in Londonderry: Art on the Common Fine Art Show, which celebrates its sixth year on Saturday, Sept. 11, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., is a celebration not only of local artists but also of the crisp fall season. “We have it in the fall because it is such a great time of year,” said Barbara Scott, publicity coordinator and artist. “With the foliage and the apples, people get out and celebrate the weather before the long winter comes. But we also want them to see beautiful art.” Visitors will see mostly local artists and the work will be fine art, which does not include crafts and photographs. Scott said the decision was made to ensure everyone who was selling their art was on a level playing field, as photographs often sell for far less than paintings. “All of the work is skill-based,” Scott said. The event will be held on the Londonderry Town Common, at the corner of Mammoth and Pillsbury roads. The rain date is Sunday, Sept. 12, and Scott said, following last year’s bad weather, the Londonderry Arts committee will not be afraid to use the rain date if necessary. Visit www.londonderryculture.org or call Barbara Scott at 434-4799.

• Technology shrinks art: Boston sculptor Donna Dodson is used to creating sculptures that are one to four feet tall and made of traditional materials like wood and stone. But when an opportunity came to turn some of her work into jewelry, she needed to branch out. That is when she visited CADD Edge. Dodson said when she brought her sculpture to the Londonderry facility it was scanned in 3-D using a hand-held laser device, where it was then translated into a digital file on the computer. From the computer it was printed on a 3-D printer (this technology was developed at MIT), which made it ¼ scale. But this is no paper image. These prints are fabricated out of gypsum, sand and an adhesive. The final sculptures feel like plastic and Dodson has sold some to collectors. “Using this technology really allows an artist to play with the size of the work,” Dodson said. “I can make my sculptures either really big or really small.” Dodson said the technology isn’t really new but it isn’t mainstream yet. And while she will stick with her traditional sculpting practices, she does think it is neat.

• New Percent for Art project: The New Hampshire State Council on the Arts is requesting proposals for existing and newly commissioned artwork and craft work for both indoor and outdoor spaces of the New Hampshire Army National Guard, Construction and Facilities Management Office, Building F in Concord. Deadline for submissions is Friday, Oct. 15. Contact Julie Mento, visual arts associate, at 271-0790 or julie.mento@dcr.nh.gov. —Adam Coughlin






®2014 Hippo Press. site by wedu