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Jun 27, 2017







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 Noodles for One

1 (7-ounce) package shirataki noodles, drained and rinsed well
¼ cup soy sauce
¼ cup shredded carrot
1/3 cup finely sliced bell pepper
¼ cup chopped scallions
1 teaspoon sesame oil
2 eggs
 
Sauce 
Adapted from Show Me the Yummy
1/4 cup soy sauce.
2 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar.
2 tablespoons sesame oil.
1 teaspoon Sriracha more to less to taste.
2 tablespoons coconut sugar packed.
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger.
½-1 teaspoon red pepper flakes to taste 
2 cloves garlic minced or pressed.
Topping: Toasted sesame seeds
 
Heat a wok or large frying pan over medium high heat. Dry fry noodles until a lot of the wetness is gone, about 2 to 3 minutes. Push to the perimeter of the pan. In empty space in middle of pan, add vegetables and 1 teaspoon of sesame oil, mix and cook for about 30 seconds, then move to perimeter. Crack eggs in space created and scramble, mixing all ingredients together. Add sauce and stir together until everything is blended. Serve and top with toasted sesame seeds.




Perishables: Shirataki Noodles


03/16/17
By Allison Willson Dudas



 The general public seems to always be on the hunt for noodle variations. From whole-wheat pasta to rice vermicelli to zoodles, noodles run the gamut. There’s something universally appealing about the noodle shape, and it’s not going away. I am not a noodle connoisseur but I have eaten my fair share of noodles. I love Italian, devour Japanese noodle bowls and have been known to eat carrots in noodle form! Imagine my surprise when I found out about a noodle virtually without calories or carbohydrates. Impossible! I had to explore.

Shirataki noodles are derived from the konjac yam. Glucomannan starch is extracted from the konjac yam to make these slippery noodles. According to the Serious Eats website, this starch is fiber that the body cannot digest. Since the body can’t digest it, there are essentially no carbs or calories. It’s kind of crazy, right?
You’ll find shirataki noodles in the refrigerated section near the tofu or, like I did, at your local Asian market. Shirataki noodles come packaged in water and need to be rinsed well before eating. Warning: the liquid in which they are stored smells a little fishy. While opening the packaging isn’t pleasant, I assure you the noodles don’t taste fishy at all. Like tofu, they seem to take on the taste of whatever they’re near or whatever they’re cooked with. 
While I wouldn’t recommend substituting shirataki noodles in Italian meals, I do think they’re top-notch for Asian dishes. Try them in your favorite recipe or follow mine. 





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