The Hippo

HOME| ADVERTISING| CONTACT US|

 
Nov 24, 2017







NEWS & FEATURES

POLITICAL

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS

MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

POP CULTURE



BEST OF
CLASSIFIEDS
ADVERTISING
CONTACT US
PAST ISSUES
ABOUT US
MOBILE UPDATES
LIST MY CALENDAR ITEM


Sonny and the Sunsets, Moods Baby Moods (Polyvinyl Records)




Volbeat, Seal the Deal & Let’s Boogie (Republic/Universal Records)

Sixth album from the Danish metal quartet, who began life as a heavy version of Creed (literally so, being that they outright lifted a few riffs and whanot from those music-critic-workout-bags). Don’t get me wrong, the material from their 2005 debut The Strength The Sound The Songs had some noteworthy moments, mostly when they laid down stubborn low-end chug-a-chug doom, but again, well, you know, Creed. Thing about these guys is they claim rockabilly as one of their main thrusts, which may have been true after 2005, but suffice to say I hadn’t kept track, and now you know all I know — I’m just in this to see if they’ve become as pasteurized as Five Finger Death Punch. “The Devil’s Bleeding Crown” is a good start, fusing Black Sabbath’s Master of Reality grind with Metallica’s sort-of-rawness (the singer even reminds me of Green Day’s Billie Joe Armstrong, which I hadn’t noticed before, so there’s lots of hope, honest). After the catchy but disposable WWE-entrance-theme-styled “Marie Lavaeu” they suddenly turn into White Lion-meets-Mumford and Sons with “The Bliss,” which will hopefully be an a-ha moment for the band — it’s quite brilliant. But then again, so is the hokily titled “Gates of Babylon,” if you like Richie Blackmore-type pseudo-prog. Lots of decent stuff here, if fuzzily focused. A




Sonny and the Sunsets, Moods Baby Moods (Polyvinyl Records)
CD Reviews June 15, 2016

06/16/16
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



Sonny and the Sunsets, Moods Baby Moods (Polyvinyl Records)

The fanzine-born Polyvinyl Records label continues to impress me, mostly owing to their more raw but catchy bands, such as this retro-minded San Francisco weirdo and his current cast of cronies. The skill levels are low, with Sonny’s vocals sounding like Beck on cough syrup while the band fixates on entry-level funk and doo-wop, but with all the wooziness, spectacular apathy and absolutely filthy sound, it’s altogther a throwback to 1990s rock at its most captivating. Like something cobbled together by The Clash’s wimpy little brother, the doonk-doonk-bass-propelled “Modern Age” comes off like an early Joe Jackson jam-out, but then there are surf-noise pieces like “Death Cream Part 2,” which spot-welds Lou Reed onto Raveonettes. In the midst of all this, “Nightmares” sprinkles some most welcome synth-cheese over a phoned-in Depeche Mode beat. Super neat stuff here. They’ll be at the Once Ballroom in Somerville, Mass., on July 12.
 

 






®2017 Hippo Press. site by wedu