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Dover Mini Maker Faire

When: Saturday, Aug. 26, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Where: The Children’s Museum of New Hampshire, 6 Washington St., Dover
Cost: Buy tickets online before Aug. 25 for $10 at dover.makerfaire.com or at the door for $12. Children 5 and under get in free.




They’ve got it made
Interact with creators and their work at Mini Maker Faire

08/24/17
By Ethan Hogan



 Game-creators, robot-builders, electronics hobbyists and other inventors will be at the fifth annual Dover Mini Maker Faire at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire in Dover on Saturday, Aug. 26. 

The fair will feature creations from more than 65 makers from around New England. As the only licensed Maker Faire in the state, it’s expected to see roughly 1,600 attendees, according to museum Communications Director Neva Cole.
Booths will be set up for individual makers and organizations that support engineering and design.
“Some are nonprofits; others are individual makers who have something going on in their garage that they have been working on for a really long time and they want to share,” Cole said.
Many of the makers will allow visitors to interact with their work and ask them about their process.
James Matthew is a maker from Vermont who built his own version of the Segway after becoming fascinated with the transportation technology. Using information online and his own mechanical engineering experience, Matthew re-created the accelerator and gyroscope technology for his own transportation unit, which will be on display at the fair.
“It’s one of those things where I’ve always wanted to make it, but now that it’s built I don’t really know what to do with it,” Matthew said.
Matthew said he is not sure yet whether he will let people ride his transportation unit or whether he will give demonstrations himself, but either way he wants to share his project’s story with any curious makers.
J Fitzpatrick is a maker and high school principal who decided he wanted to create a conversation-themed card game. Players are given a set of cards with words and phrases on them like “hello,” “not my problem,” “I love you,” “I appreciate you” and “it’s not me,  it’s you.” 
Once a player has been handed a card, the card is theirs to use on someone else. The use of the cards could include good-natured banter between coworkers, quiet gestures with loved ones and interactions with a complete stranger. 
“The goal was to create an opportunity for people to interact with each other without their phones,” Fitzpatrick said.
The fair will be the first time Fitzpatrick has used the cards outside of his friend group, and he is hoping people will be interested and share their ideas with him.
“I’m looking forward to being ... around other creative people,” Fitzpatrick said.
If you hear loud, robotic music at the fair, chances are it is coming from an electric coil music device from oneTesla. Marissa Dupont, chief operating officer of oneTesla, said the 1-foot-tall electric coil can make any song into an electric performance. 
“They are pretty loud, and we usually gather a big crowd,” Dupont said.
The coil accelerates the electricity from an outlet to create powerful voltage bursts of music, according to Dupont. The project started on kickstarter.com as the brainchild of two MIT students, Heidi Baumgartner and Bayley Wang. It’s now available as a kit that welding and electronics hobbyists can use to build and play their favorite songs.
The fair will be spread out over the upper and lower sections of Henry Law Park and at 1 Washington Road, across the river from the museum.
Cole said Ghostbusters and pirates will be spotted walking around the fair this year after last year’s Star Wars Stormtroopers were a success.
“Because it’s such a family-oriented event, we definitely encourage people to come dressed however they want,” said Cole.
The Maker Faire will also feature food — some of which is especially fitting for the event. SubZero of Nashua uses liquid nitrogen to freeze ice cream in seconds, so the process is also a lesson in chemistry, Cole said.
Educational workshops on engineering, physics and coffee-tasting will be held throughout the day inside the museum.





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