The Art Roundup 22/06/02

The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

•​ Sculptures revealed: The 15th annual Nashua International Sculpture Symposium will conclude with a closing ceremony, open to the public, on Saturday, June 4, at 1 p.m. at the installation site, which is near the old bridge on Commercial Street in Nashua. This year’s artists — Anna Miller from Connecticut, Brent Howard from New Jersey and Corinna D’Schoto from Massachusetts — have spent the last few weeks working at the Picker Artist studios in Nashua to create three outdoor sculptures based on the theme of “Merriment” for permanent installation in the city. “This is all for the sake of the public, for accessible public art,” Jim Larson, the sculpture symposium’s artistic director, told the Hippo last month. “The art produced is not a luxury object that you would see in a gallery — it is everyday artwork that is impactful and powerful. [It shows] we need artwork in our life every day, like food.” A map of the existing sculpture sites, along with suggested walking and biking tour routes, is available at nashuasculpturesymposium.org.

•​ Broadway showcase: The Garrison Players present “Showstoppers: A Celebration”on Friday, June 3, and Saturday, June 4, at 8 p.m. both days at the Garrison Players Community Arts Center (449 Roberts Road, Rollinsford). The evening will feature songs from Tony Award-winning Broadway musicals through the years, from 1949’s Kiss Me, Kate to 2017’s Dear Evan Hanson. Tickets cost $20 for adults and $15 for students. Visit garrisonplayers.org.

Manchester art fest
Save the date for the first annual Manchester Citywide Arts Festival, set for Monday, Sept. 12, through Sunday, Sept. 18. The weeklong celebration of the arts will feature performances, gallery openings, speakers, walking tours, live art-making and more throughout downtown Manchester, culminating in a free, family-friendly street fair on Hanover Street on Saturday, Sept. 17, and Sunday, Sept. 18, which will include an arts market with booths by dozens of local artists and craftspeople, interactive art installations and experiences, live performances by local musicians and dancers, food vendors and more. A call for local artists to participate in the street fair arts market had an application deadline of June 1. Visit manchesterartsfest.com.

Graphite drawings: The New Hampshire Art Association presents the work of artist member Barbara Morse in two exhibitions. “Around Town” is on view now through June 17 in the NHAA’s gallery space at the Concord Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center (49 S. Main St., Concord, concordnhchamber.com), and “Come In-To Focus” is on view now through June 30 in the gallery at Creative Framing Solutions (410 Chestnut St., Manchester, 320-5988), with an opening reception for the latter planned for Thursday, June 9, from 5 to 7 p.m. Morse’s work includes drawings done in graphite, with hints of color done in acrylic. “Working in graphite and sometimes adding a hint of color to attract attention to an area enhancing the entire image, no matter the level of labor intensity, I find joy and satisfaction watching a piece come to life before me,” Morse said in a press release from NHAA. Current gallery hours at Creative Framing Solutions are Tuesday through Friday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Current gallery hours at the Concord Chamber are Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit nhartassociation.org or call 431-4230.

Painting night: Two Villages Art Society presents an exhibition, “Night Vision,” at its gallery at the Bates Building (846 Main St., Contoocook) now through June 18. It features a collection of paintings by Owen Krzyzaniak Geary that illustrate New Hampshire’s forests at nighttime. “My concern for the environment has always been central in my artistic pursuits,” the 25-year-old artist, who is originally from Hopkinton, said in a press release from the art society, adding that he wants his art to celebrate nature, “even those aspects of it that we often consider mysterious or threatening.” Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372.


ART

Exhibits

• “APPEAL OF THE REAL: 19TH CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD” exhibition features photographs taken throughout the Mediterranean to record the ruins of ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through June 12. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

• “NATURE AT NIGHT: PAINTINGS BY OWEN KRZYZANIAK GEARY” Two Villages Art Society (846 Main St., Contoocook). On display now through June 18. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372.

• “WARHOL SCREEN TESTS” In the mid-1960s, American multimedia artist Andy Warhol had shot more than 400 short, silent, black-and-white films of his friends at his studio in New York City. Warhol referred to the films, which were unscripted and played in slow motion, as “film portraits” or “stillies.” The exhibition will feature 20 of those films, provided by the Andy Warhol Museum, in loops across four large-scale projections. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through July 24. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

• “ARGHAVAN KHOSRAVI” Artist’s surrealist paintings explore themes of exile, freedom and empowerment; center female protagonists; and allude to human rights issues, particularly those affecting women and immigrants. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through Sept. 5. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

• “THE PEOPLE’S SCULPTOR: THE LIFE AND WORKS OF JOHN ROGERS” Exhibit celebrates the art of American sculptor John Rogers, who came to Manchester in 1850, and explores the influence that Manchester had on Rogers’ life and work. Presented by the Manchester Historic Association. On view now through September. Millyard Museum (200 Bedford St., Manchester). Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission costs $8 for adults, $6 for seniors age 62 and up and college students, $4 for youth ages 12 through 18, and is free for kids under age 12. Call 622-7531 or visit manchesterhistoric.org/millyard-museum.

• “WOOL: CONTEMPORARY FIBER ART EXHIBITION Twiggs Gallery (254 King St., Boscawen). June 4 through Sept. 2, with an opening reception on Sat., June 4, from 1 to 3 p.m. Gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com or call 975-0015.

• “PIXELS, WOOD, CLAY” Two Villages Art Society presents an exhibition of work by artists Tony Gilmore, Rick Manganello and Caren Helm. The Bates Building (846 Main St., Contoocook). Aug. 12 through Sept. 9. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, from noon to 4 p.m. There will be an opening reception on Sat., Aug. 13, from noon to 2 p.m. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372.

ART ON MAIN The City of Concord and the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce present a year-round outdoor public art exhibition in Concord’s downtown featuring works by professional sculptors. All sculptures will be for sale. Visit concordnhchamber.com/creativeconcord, call 224-2508 or email tsink@concordnhchamber.com.

Fairs and markets

CONCORD ARTS MARKET The juried outdoor artisan and fine art market runs one Saturday a month, June through October, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Market dates are June 11, July 30, Aug. 20, Sept. 17 and Oct. 15. Rollins Park, 33 Bow St., Concord. concordartsmarket.net. The first market will be held on Saturday, June 11. Visit concordartsmarket.net/summer-arts-market.html.

FATHER’S DAY WEEKEND CRAFT FESTIVAL There will be more than 100 artisan booths indoors and outdoors. Sat., June 18, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sun., June 19, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Deerfield Fairgrounds (34 Stage Road, Deerfield). Admission costs $8 for adults and covers both days. Youth age 13 and under get in for free. Visit castleberryfairs.com.

Tours

NASHUA PUBLIC ART AUDIO TOUR Self-guided audio tours of the sculptures and murals in downtown Nashua, offered via the Distrx app, which uses Bluetooth iBeacon technology to automatically display photos and text and provides audio descriptions at each stop on the tour as tourists approach the works of art. Each tour has 10 to 15 stops. Free and accessible on Android and iOS on demand. Available in English and Spanish. Visit downtownnashua.org/nashua-art-tour.

Workshops and classes

• “INTRO TO 3D PRINTING” Port City Makerspace (68 Morning St., Portsmouth). Wed., June 8, from 6 to 9 p.m. The cost is $25 for members of the makerspace and $45 for nonmembers. Call 373-1002 or visit portcitymakerspace.com for more information.

THEATRE

Shows

CHILDREN OF THE GRIM Presented by Bitter Pill. Players’ Ring Theatre (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth). Now through June 5, with showtimes on Fridays at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Tickets cost $28 for adults and $25 for seniors age 65 and up and students. Masks and proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test are required. Visit playersring.org or call 436-8123.

LEGALLY BLONDE THE MUSICAL The Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) presents. June 3 through June 26, with showtimes on Friday at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at noon. Tickets cost $25 to $46. Visit palacetheatre.org or call 668-5588.

OLIVER! JR. The Palace Youth Theatre presents. Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester). Tues., June 7, and Wed., June 8, at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $12 to $15. Visit palacetheatre.org or call 668-5588.

•​ A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM Seven Stages Shakespeare Company performs. Players’ Ring Theatre (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth). June 10 through June 19, with showtimes Thursday through Saturday at 7:30 p.m., Sunday at 2:30 p.m., and an additional show on Sat., June 11, at 2:30 p.m. Tickets cost $25 for adults and $22 for seniors age 65 and up and students. Masks and proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test are required. Visit playersring.org or call 436-8123.

•​ SEUSSICAL JR. The Palace Teen Apprentice Company presents. Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester). Wed., June 15, and Thurs., June 16, at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $12 to $15. Visit palacetheatre.org or call 668-5588.

•​ ANYTHING GOES The Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) presents. June 16 through July 23, with showtimes on Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $32 to $52. Visit seacoastrep.org or call 433-4472.

MACBETH: A NECROMANTIC EXPERIENCE Cue Zero Theatre Co. presents. Derry Opera House (29 W. Broadway, Derry). Fri., June 17, and Sat., June 18, at 7:30 p.m., and Sun., June 19, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $15. Visit cztheatre.com.

THE BALD SOPRANO Produced by the Community Players of Concord. The Hatbox Theatre (located inside the Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Fri., June 17 through Sun., June 26. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com or call 715-2315.

CLASSICAL

Events

•​ “IMAGES OF AMERICA THROUGH MUSIC AND ART” The Strafford Wind Symphony presents. Sat., June 18, 7 p.m. Rochester Opera House (31 Wakefield St., Rochester). Visit rochesteroperahouse.com or call 335-1992.

Getting back into the creative flow

Nashua art advocate’s work on exhibit at the library

When she wasn’t busy running Positive Street Art in Nashua, or working as the constituent services and cultural affairs coordinator in the city’s Office of the Mayor, Cecilia Ulibarri carved out some time in the past few years to work on her own art, including during an intense residency at the Factory on Willow in Manchester. The result of those efforts can be seen in her new exhibit, “Journeys of an Artist,” on display in the Nashua Public Library Art Gallery now through June 30.

“It has some of the pieces from when I first started through what I created through the residency,” Ulibarri said. “I thought it was kind of cool to show that journey of my role as an artist.”

She grew up with a family of artists so was always exposed to it, she said, but she never really took art seriously until she was about 30. And once she did, she found it challenging to share her work with others.

“Unless you’re part of [an artists’] group it was really hard to get in spaces if you didn’t have … traditional art,” she said. “A lot of my stuff is abstract contemporary.”

Ulibarri started with small shows at her home, then started to expand and became part of RAW Artist Collaborative from 2011 to 2014, showcasing in Boston and once in New York.

Also during that time, she met Manuel Ramirez — now her husband — and connected through art.

“We started wanting to do murals in town,” Ulibarri said. “We talked to a bunch of citizens, and it seemed like that was something the citizens would actually embrace.”

In 2012, the couple founded Positive Street Art, a Nashua nonprofit that is still beautifying the community today.

And then her own art fell by the wayside again.

“While I was building the nonprofit, I kind of got lost in my own workflow,” she said. “I would work most of the time while Manny was the lead artist on most of these murals, so I didn’t give myself time to create.”

More recently — and in large part because she had some extra time to slow down and think during the pandemic — Ulibarri realized she wanted to start making more time to create.

“I need to keep doing the things that make me happy and fulfill me,” she said.

She dove headfirst into the artists in residency program at the Factory on Willow; she and Ramirez did it together and stayed onsite in the Manchester space in order to get the full experience.

“I was so intimidated to get back into the creative flow and purge some of the ideas that I’d been holding on to,” Ulibarri said.

She said the Factory on Willow doesn’t dictate what you’re working on, but it does offer help and resources on whatever aspect of your art you want help with; Ramirez, for example, wanted to revamp his website. Ulibarri focused on her abstract art.

“I’m inspired by many things, and I don’t like to limit myself on my mediums on what I do,” she said. “I guess my creative flow just stems from shapes and colors and using the feelings that I’m having behind them transporting them onto canvas.”

Some of her works in the show feature new-to-her techniques.

“I fell in love with foils,” she said. “There’s just something about shiny things — it adds some luxury to it, and it just attracts the eye.”

There’s also a piece that layers wood pieces and resin, creating a kind of 3D effect that she hadn’t done before.

“I would like people to realize that abstract and contemporary art is more of a chance to be able to … look at themselves or feel through the art that they’re looking at, to really be able to experience it in a different way,” she said. “When you take yourself away from the heaviness of society … and really just connect with shapes and colors, really just feel the art … [it’s] a little bit deeper than just walking by [a piece] and saying, oh that’s a landscape.”

While the show is called “Journeys of an Artist,” Ulibarri said the average person might think it’s like looking at works from two different artists.

“I feel like we try to keep ourselves in a box, but I feel like that’s very limiting,” she said. “I like to take myself out of that box sometimes and get out of that comfort zone.”

Ulibarri was set to take another step out of her comfort zone on June 1, transitioning from president and cofounder of Positive Street Art to executive director. The organization just rented a larger space, and a grand opening is scheduled for June 5, from 1 to 5 p.m. at 48 Bridge St. Tickets are $30; find the event on PSA’s Facebook page.

“We’re creating [more] safe spaces for artists,” she said.

“Journeys of an Artist”
Where: Nashua Public Library, 2 Court St.
When: Now through June 30 anytime the library is open. There’s a Meet the Artist reception Thursday, June 2, from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Visit: nashualibrary.org

Featured photo: Savoir Faire. Art by Cecilia Ulibarri. Courtesy photo.

The Art Roundup 22/05/26

The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

•​ Once and Our Town: The Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) has two upcoming productions. The first is Once, with showtimes on Thursday, May 26, at 7:30 p.m.; Friday, May 27, at 8 p.m.; Saturday, May 28, at 2 and 8 p.m.; and Sunday, June 5, at 2 and 7:30 p.m. The Academy Award-, Grammy-, Olivier- and Tony Award-winning musical tells the story of Guy, a singer-songwriter who fixes vacuums in a Dublin shop with his father by day and plays music at local pubs and on the streets by night. Just when he is about to give up on his dream, he meets Girl, a Czech immigrant, who inspires him to rediscover his love of music. The next production is Our Town, with showtimes on Sunday, May 29, at 2 and 7:30 p.m.; Thursday, June 2, at 7:30 p.m.; Friday, June 3, at 8 p.m., and Saturday, June 4, at 2 and 8 p.m. The 1938 play by Thornton Wilder tells of love, life and death in the fictional small New Hampshire town of Grover’s Corners. Tickets for both shows range from $32 to $52. Visit seacoastrep.org or call 433-4472.

•​ Abstract art: Catch “Impact! Abstract!” at Twiggs Gallery (254 King St., Boscawen) before it’s gone on Saturday, May 28. The exhibition features the work of several local artists: Ann Saunderson, who works in acrylic, mixed media, oil and cold wax and monotype; Daniela Wenzel, who does oil painting, assemblage, ink drawing, driftwood pyrography and improvised quilt-making; Kate Higley, who does printmaking; Ethel Hills, who works in acrylic; and Grace Mattern, who does mixed media collage. “It showcases artists boldly approaching abstraction in completely different ways with a wide variety of media,” Twiggs gallery director Laura Morrison told the Hippo in April. “Most of the artwork in this exhibit is on the smaller side, yet each piece really stands out on its own. It’s very powerful work.” Gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com or call 975-0015.

Voices of the past
Canterbury Shaker Village (288 Shaker Road, Canterbury) has a new art exhibition, “Wilderness: Light Sizzles Around Me,” opening on Saturday, May 28. It features sculptures and two-dimensional works created by Lesley Dill as part of Dill’s ongoing investigation into the voices and persona’s of America’s past. “These personas and their times stir something deep in my own family history and sense of self,” Dill said in an artist statement. “I am compelled to this restrictive time period of limited access to a diversity of written word, and the bravery of these figures’ response.” The exhibition will remain on display in the Village’s Hubbard Gallery through Sept. 11. Visit shakers.org or call 783-9511.

Memorial Day craft shopping: Head to the Mill Falls Marketplace (312 Daniel Webster Hwy., Meredith) for the Meredith Memorial Day Weekend Craft Festival, happening on Saturday, May 28, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, May 29, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Monday, May 30, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be more than 100 juried craftsmen and artisans from all over New England displaying and selling their work, including fine jewelry, folk art, quilts, aerial photography, fiber arts, wood burning, candles, leatherwork, ornaments, floral designs, pottery, pet accessories, paintings, upcycled items, mixed media pieces, custom signs, stained glass, metalwork, furniture, specialty food items and more. Admission is free for this rain-or-shine event, and pets on a leash are welcome. Call 332-2616 or visit castleberryfairs.com.

Call for printmakers: The New Hampshire Art Association is inviting submissions for its upcoming “New England Printmakers” exhibition. The juried printmaking exhibition, which will run from June 29 through July 31 at the NHAA’s Robert Lincoln Levy Gallery in Portsmouth, is open to both NHAA members and non-members. Artists may submit up to three pieces created within the last five years. The online submission deadline is Friday, May 27. Visit nhartassociation.org or call 421-4230. — Angie Sykeny


ART

Exhibits

• “IMPACT! ABSTRACT! Exhibition featuring the abstract work of six local artists, including Ann Saunderson, who works in acrylic, mixed media, oil and cold wax and monotype; Daniela Wenzel, who does oil painting, assemblage, ink drawing, driftwood pyrography and improvised quilt-making; Kate Higley, who does printmaking; Ethel Hills, who works in acrylic; and Grace Mattern, who does mixed media collage. Twiggs Gallery (254 King St., Boscawen). On view now through May 28. Gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com or call 975-0015.

• “APPEAL OF THE REAL: 19TH CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD” exhibition features photographs taken throughout the Mediterranean to record the ruins of ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through June 12. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “WARHOL SCREEN TESTS” In the mid-1960s, American multimedia artist Andy Warhol had shot more than 400 short, silent, black-and-white films of his friends at his studio in New York City. Warhol referred to the films, which were unscripted and played in slow motion, as “film portraits” or “stillies.” The exhibition will feature 20 of those films, provided by the Andy Warhol Museum, in loops across four large-scale projections. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through July 24. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

Fairs and markets

CONCORD ARTS MARKET The juried outdoor artisan and fine art market runs one Saturday a month, June through October, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Market dates are June 11, July 30, Aug. 20, Sept. 17 and Oct. 15. Rollins Park, 33 Bow St., Concord. concordartsmarket.net. The first market will be held on Saturday, June 11. Visit concordartsmarket.net/summer-arts-market.html for more information.

FATHER’S DAY WEEKEND CRAFT FESTIVAL There will be more than 100 artisan booths indoors and outdoors. Sat., June 18, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sun., June 19, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Deerfield Fairgrounds (34 Stage Road, Deerfield). Admission costs $8 for adults and covers both days. Youth age 13 and under get in for free. Visit castleberryfairs.com.

CRAFTSMEN’S FAIR The annual nine-day outdoor craft fair hosted by the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen features hundreds of craftspeople with vendor booths, plus special craft exhibitions, demonstrations, hands-on workshops and more. Sat., Aug. 6 through Sun., Aug. 14. Mount Sunapee Resort, 1398 Route 103, Newbury. Call 224-3375 or visit nhcrafts.org for more information.

GREELEY PARK ART SHOW The annual outdoor juried art show hosted by Nashua Area Artists Association features a variety of artwork for sale. Greeley Park, 100 Concord St., Nashua. Sat., Aug. 20, and Sun., Aug. 21, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit nashuaarts.org/greeleyparkartshow.

Special events

NASHUA INTERNATIONAL SCULPTURE SYMPOSIUM The 15th annual event is at the Picker Artists (3 Pine St. in Nashua) and features the three artists — Anna Miller from Connecticut, Brent Howard from New Jersey and Corinna D’Schoto from Massachusetts — who will be creating pieces on this year’s theme “Merriment.” Visit the sculptures Mondays through Saturdays from May 16 through June 1, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., to see them work. Or get even more involved by signing up to bring a meal or volunteer at the site, according to the press release. Go to nashuasculpturesymposium.org for more on this year’s Symposium or a look at the pieces from previous years and to find a map to go tour the pieces for yourself.

THEATRE

Classes/workshops

STORYTELLING WORKSHOPS Monthly workshop series hosted by True Tales Live storytelling showcase. First Tuesday (except November), from 7 to 8:30 p.m., virtual, via Zoom. Registration is required. Visit truetaleslivenh.org for more information.

Shows

CHILDREN OF THE GRIM Presented by Bitter Pill. Players’ Ring Theatre (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth). Now through June 5, with showtimes on Fridays at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Tickets cost $28 for adults and $25 for seniors age 65 and up and students. Masks and proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test are required. Visit playersring.org or call 436-8123.

LEGALLY BLONDE THE MUSICAL The Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) presents. June 3 through June 26, with showtimes on Friday at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at noon. Tickets cost $25 to $46. Visit palacetheatre.org or call 668-5588.

OLIVER! JR. The Palace Youth Theatre presents. Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester). Tues., June 7, and Wed., June 8, at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $12 to $15. Visit palacetheatre.org or call 668-5588.

•​ A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM Seven Stages Shakespeare Company performs. Players’ Ring Theatre (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth). June 10 through June 19, with showtimes Thursday through Saturday at 7:30 p.m., Sunday at 2:30 p.m., and an additional show on Sat., June 11, at 2:30 p.m. Tickets cost $25 for adults and $22 for seniors age 65 and up and students. Masks and proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test are required. Visit playersring.org or call 436-8123.

CLASSICAL

Events

•​ “IMAGES OF AMERICA THROUGH MUSIC AND ART” The Strafford Wind Symphony presents. Sat., June 18, 7 p.m. Rochester Opera House (31 Wakefield St., Rochester). Visit rochesteroperahouse.com or call 335-1992.

Open calls

THE RHYTHM OF NEW HAMPSHIRE SHOW CHORUS Women’s a cappella chorus is looking for female singers in the region to join. The group, an affiliate of the North American singing organization Harmony, Inc., performs a wide variety of music, including Broadway musical songs, patriotic songs, pop, jazz and seasonal pieces, for community and veterans’ events and private functions. Rehearsals are held weekly on Thursdays from 6:45 to 8:30 p.m. at the Marion Gerrish Community Center, 39 W. Broadway, Derry. Masks are required for singing, but both vaccinated and unvaccinated singers are welcome. Visit rnhchorus.org or email info@rnhchorus.org for more information.

Sculpted merriment

Visit artists at work at Nashua International Sculpture Symposium

Three artists have spent the past two weeks carving merriment out of metal and stone as they work toward their final creations for the 15th annual Nashua International Sculpture Symposium.

The theme this year is merriment — in part to honor Meri Goyette, a major Nashua arts supporter who inspired the event — and you can still watch the artists bring that theme to life at their worksite outside the Picker Artists building, where they’ve been since May 12, for about 14 hours a day every day.

“This is all for the sake of the public, for accessible public art,” said Jim Larson, the event’s artistic director. “The art produced is not a luxury object that you would see in a gallery — it is everyday artwork that is impactful and powerful. [It shows] we need artwork in our life every day, like food.”

As it has been since the pandemic started, the artists this year are all from the U.S.: Anna Miller is from Connecticut, Brent Howard is from New Jersey and Corinna D’Schoto is from Boston.

“We usually have international sculptors,” symposium president Gail Moriarty said. “[But it’s] really cool that they speak the same language.”

That makes for a different atmosphere than some past years, when artists have needed interpreters or have spoken limited English.

“They have amazing chemistry and a lot of dialogue,” Larson said. “The definition of symposium … is a gathering of people to converse, drink and share ideas [and they’re] really leaning into that.”

The artists are chosen not necessarily for their past sculptures, but for their potential.

“Two of our artists had never carved a piece of stone in their life, and they’re absolutely killing it,” Larson said.

One artist hasn’t worked with either metal or stone, he said, and it’s not unusual for the symposium board to choose artists who don’t have experience with large-scale sculptures and materials. Larson likened it to hiring someone for a job who has a great resume and the right attitude and is a good fit even if they don’t have the specific experience of that position.

“My job as the director here is to kind of make that leap,” he said. “You end up with a new take, a fresh perspective, and it shows in the finished work.”

Once they saw the site and the materials and tools they have to work with, the artists spent their first days in Nashua planning and sketching.

“We let them do whatever they want — it depends on the creative process of the artist,” Moriarty said. “It’s different for everybody, and we welcome that.”

Part of the purpose of the symposium, Larson said, is to give artists the support to try something new, including access to tools and materials.

“[The event] allows them to make work that they couldn’t or wouldn’t otherwise make,” he said.

Larson, who has a background in structural metal fabrication and structural stone masonry, sources the materials for these projects.

“[Some of] this year’s stone came from a small family quarry operation in West Rutland, Vermont,” Larson said. “It’s some of the nicest white marble in the world, and it’s a delight to carve.”

One artist is using Lake Champlain black marble that’s full of fossils and is from the oldest known reef on the planet, Larson said. Because of his background, Larson said, he knows what materials are best for carving, and where to find them. But part of his role is teaching these sculptors the art of sourcing their materials.

“An artist that has a really fruitful, creative practice, who is a widely creative person … should be able to creatively source their material as well,” he said.

The artists will be at the Picker building until about June 1, when they’ll start transporting their pieces to the installation site. Sculptures from years past can be seen throughout the city; this year, they’ll be at one site on Commercial Street, Moriarty said, next to the old bridge.

“They’ll be in the middle of the big push to get their work done,” Larson said of the artists’ final weekend of sculpting. “It’s the most exciting time.”

Visitors are encouraged to stop by the site while they’re finishing up the final touches.

“It’s such a rare thing to be able to see an artist working through these tangible things,” Larson said. “They’re working in front of a huge brick wall that becomes [like] a stage. It’s a pretty absurd look.”

Nashua is the only city in the country to host an international sculpture symposium, and both Larson and Moriarty emphasized the importance of the community in being able to host the event. Residents host the artists in their homes, bring meals as they work and provide transportation.

“The public is what keeps us going every year,” Moriarty said.

15th annual Nashua International Sculpture Symposium
Where: The Picker Artists building, 3 Pine St., Nashua, until June 1, when they’ll start moving their pieces to the installation site near the old bridge on Commercial Street
When: Visit the artists at the Picker building from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. every day until they start transporting their pieces to Commercial Street, where will be a closing ceremony on Saturday, June 4, at 1 p.m.
More information: nashuasculpturesymposium.org

Featured photo: Corinna D’Schoto is sketching details to make cuts/curve out contours of a clavicle bone (suspended by gantry). Courtesy photo.

Technicolor Dreamcoat

By Haily Morgan

Actorsingers will present the musical Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat this weekend — the Nashua-based community theater organization’s first show since the 2020 shutdown.

The show was originally scheduled to hit the stage in May 2020.

“Originally we tried to do Zoom rehearsals,” said Actorsingers board of directors member Evelyn Decker. “Then they started closing theaters, so we actually could not perform anywhere.”

The theater group stayed afloat with the help of grants and savings, she said. Now, two years later, the show is back on.

“We reauditioned. There were a fair amount of people that were in the original try. We also got some new people, and we started over again,” Decker said.

Joseph director Angelica Forcier Rosenthal said she watched as many versions of the musical as she could to help her find her vision for the production.

“Saw a lot of things I knew I did not want to do. I also try to wait to make hard decisions until I know my cast. The actors add so much variety to what’s going on,” Rosenthal said.

The musical is a sung-through comedy with lyrics by Tim Rice and music by Andrew Lloyd Webber and was the first Rice-Lloyd Webber musical to be performed publicly, according to a press release. The musical tells the biblical story of Joseph, his father Jacob, his 11 brothers and the coat of many colors, the release said.

Actor Garrett Meyer plays Simon, one of Joseph’s brothers.

“As a collective whole the brothers are very antagonistic and they are the ones that set the play in motion,” Meyer said. He says all of the brothers feed off each other’s energy as well. “From a stage point of view, it is very fun to watch.”

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat
When: Friday, May 20, at 8 p.m.; Saturday, May 21, at 2 & 8 p.m.; Sunday, May 22, at 2 p.m.
Where: Keefe Center for the Arts, 117 Elm St. in Nashua
Tickets: $20 for adults, $18 for seniors and students (plus a $2.50 fee), available at actorsingers.org

Featured photo: Pictured Andrew Gibson (standing,) and Jesse Drake. Courtesy photo.

The Art Roundup 22/05/19

The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

Historic Manchester sculptor: The Manchester Historic Association has a new exhibit, “The People’s Sculptor: The Life and Works of John Rogers” on view now at the Millyard Museum (200 Bedford St., Manchester). It celebrates the art of American sculptor John Rogers, who came to Manchester in 1850, and explores the influence that Manchester had on Rogers’ life and work. The exhibit will be up through September. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission costs $8 for adults, $6 for seniors age 62 and up and college students, $4 for youth ages 12 through 18, and is free for kids under age 12. Call 622-7531 or visit manchesterhistoric.org/millyard-museum.

Art classes: The League of NH Craftsmen Meredith Fine Craft Gallery (279 Daniel Webster Hwy., Meredith) is offering a jewelry-making workshop, “Pendants in a Day,” on Saturday, May 21, from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Participants will create a simple silver pendant by setting a cabochon stone into a silver bezel, and are encouraged to bring any of their own stones, beads, chains or neck cords they wish to incorporate into their pendants. The cost is $110, plus a materials fee of $10 to $40 for gemstones and $10 to $20 for necklace chains and cords, paid to the instructor on the day of the workshop. Space is limited, and registration is required. Call 279-7920 or visit meredith.nhcrafts.org/classes.

Made in America
The New Hampshire Philharmonic Orchestra concludes its 2021-2022 season with its Spring Pops concert at the Seifert Performing Arts Center (44 Geremonty Drive, Salem) on Saturday, May 21, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, May 22, at 2 p.m. The concert, “Made in America,” will pay tribute to film score composer John Williams in honor of his 90th birthday, featuring a compilation of his compositions. Other pieces on the program include “Summon the Heroes,” written for the 100th celebration of the modern Olympic games; Joan Tower’s Grammy-winning “Made in America,” and Stephen Sondheim’s “Send in the Clowns” from his 1973 musical A Little Night Music and “Comedy Tonight” from his 1966 musical A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. Tickets cost $30 for adults, $25 for seniors and $8 for students. Visit nhphil.org or call 647-6476.

The Currier Museum of Art in Manchester is offering an online five-week class for adults, “Learn to Draw: Structure and Volume with Shading with Martin Geiger,” on consecutive Thursdays, May 26 through June 23, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Students will receive an overview of structural perspective and volumes and learn the basics of using shading to create volume and structure in their drawings. Lessons will cover how the direction of light and cast shadow is combined with linear perspective, and cross hatching with atmospheric perspective with finding light and shadow to communicate distance, according to the Currier’s website. Sessions will be held in real time over Zoom. Tuition costs $225 for museum members and $250 for non-members. Call 518-4922 or visit currier.org/classes.

Macabre tales: Bitter Pill presents Children of the Grimat the Players’ Ring Theatre (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth) now through June 5, with showtimes on Friday at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. The show is inspired by writer, composer and director Billy Butler’s favorite macabre childhood stories and includes a combination of verbatim traditional tales, original tales written by Butler and nursery rhymes set to original music, performed on acoustic guitars, mandolin, banjo and cello. “There are so many wonderfully dark, strange and bizarre tales from all over the world,” Butler told the Hippo last month. “These old and new tales are an important reminder to embrace the dark, because, without it, how do we find the light?” Tickets cost $28 for adults and $25 for seniors age 65 and up and students. Masks and proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test are required. Visit playersring.org or call 436-8123.

New gallery: The Hollis Arts Society celebrates the grand opening of its new exhibition space, The Gallery on West Pearl Street (100 W. Pearl St., Nashua) on Thursday, May 19. The gallery will showcase artwork in two-month rotations, with bi-monthly featured artists and opening artist receptions, and will host events in partnership with Nashua’s Great American Downtown, according to the art society’s website. Regular gallery hours will be Thursday, from noon to 5 p.m., Friday, from 4 to 8 p.m., and Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Visit hollisartssociety.org or call 345-3462.


ART

Exhibits

• “IMPACT! ABSTRACT! Exhibition featuring the abstract work of six local artists, including Ann Saunderson, who works in acrylic, mixed media, oil and cold wax and monotype; Daniela Wenzel, who does oil painting, assemblage, ink drawing, driftwood pyrography and improvised quilt-making; Kate Higley, who does printmaking; Ethel Hills, who works in acrylic; and Grace Mattern, who does mixed media collage. Twiggs Gallery (254 King St., Boscawen). On view now through May 28. Gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com or call 975-0015.

• “APPEAL OF THE REAL: 19TH CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD” exhibition features photographs taken throughout the Mediterranean to record the ruins of ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through June 12. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “WARHOL SCREEN TESTS” In the mid-1960s, American multimedia artist Andy Warhol had shot more than 400 short, silent, black-and-white films of his friends at his studio in New York City. Warhol referred to the films, which were unscripted and played in slow motion, as “film portraits” or “stillies.” The exhibition will feature 20 of those films, provided by the Andy Warhol Museum, in loops across four large-scale projections. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through July 3. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “ARGHAVAN KHOSRAVI” Artist’s surrealist paintings explore themes of exile, freedom and empowerment; center female protagonists; and allude to human rights issues, particularly those affecting women and immigrants. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through Sept. 5. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “THE PEOPLE’S SCULPTOR: THE LIFE AND WORKS OF JOHN ROGERS” Exhibit celebrates the art of American sculptor John Rogers, who came to Manchester in 1850, and explores the influence that Manchester had on Rogers’ life and work. Presented by the Manchester Historic Association. On view now through September. Millyard Museum (200 Bedford St., Manchester). Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission costs $8 for adults, $6 for seniors age 62 and up and college students, $4 for youth ages 12 through 18, and is free for kids under age 12. Call 622-7531 or visit manchesterhistoric.org/millyard-museum.

• “NATURE AT NIGHT: PAINTINGS BY OWEN KRZYZANIAK GEARY” Two Villages Art Society (46 Main St., Contoocook). On display from May 27 through June 18. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372 for more information.

ART ON MAIN The City of Concord and the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce present a year-round outdoor public art exhibition in Concord’s downtown featuring works by professional sculptors. All sculptures will be for sale. Visit concordnhchamber.com/creativeconcord, call 224-2508 or email tsink@concordnhchamber.com for more information.

Fairs and markets

CONCORD ARTS MARKET The juried outdoor artisan and fine art market runs one Saturday a month, June through October, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Market dates are June 11, July 30, Aug. 20, Sept. 17 and Oct. 15. Rollins Park, 33 Bow St., Concord. concordartsmarket.net. The first market will be held on Saturday, June 11. Visit concordartsmarket.net/summer-arts-market.html for more information.

CRAFTSMEN’S FAIR The annual nine-day outdoor craft fair hosted by the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen features hundreds of craftspeople with vendor booths, plus special craft exhibitions, demonstrations, hands-on workshops and more. Sat., Aug. 6 through Sun., Aug. 14. Mount Sunapee Resort, 1398 Route 103, Newbury. Call 224-3375 or visit nhcrafts.org for more information.

THEATRE

Shows

THE PLAY THAT GOES WRONG Presented by the Manchester Community Theatre Players. Manchester Community Theatre Players Theatre, located at the North End Montessori School (698 Beech St., Manchester). Showtimes on Fri., May 20, and Sat., May 21, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 and must be purchased in advance. Masks and proof of vaccination are required to enter the theater. Visit manchestercommunitytheatre.com or call 327-6777.

CHILDREN OF THE GRIM Presented by Bitter Pill. Players’ Ring Theatre (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth). Now through June 5, with showtimes on Fridays at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Tickets cost $28 for adults and $25 for seniors age 65 and up and students. Masks and proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test are required. Visit playersring.org or call 436-8123.

THE BALD SOPRANO Produced by the Community Players of Concord. The Hatbox Theatre (located inside the Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Fri., June 17 through Sun., June 26. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com or call 715-2315 for more information.

CLASSICAL

SPRING POPS BROADWAY AND MORE The New Hampshire Philharmonic Orchestra performs. Seifert Performing Arts Center, 44 Geremonty Drive, Salem. Sat., May 21, at 7:30 p.m., and Sun., May 22, at 2 p.m. Visit nhphil.org or call 647-6476 for more information.

Open calls

THE RHYTHM OF NEW HAMPSHIRE SHOW CHORUS Women’s a cappella chorus is looking for female singers in the region to join. The group, an affiliate of the North American singing organization Harmony, Inc., performs a wide variety of music, including Broadway musical songs, patriotic songs, pop, jazz and seasonal pieces, for community and veterans’ events and private functions. Rehearsals are held weekly on Thursdays from 6:45 to 8:30 p.m. at the Marion Gerrish Community Center, 39 W. Broadway, Derry. Masks are required for singing, but both vaccinated and unvaccinated singers are welcome. Visit rnhchorus.org or email info@rnhchorus.org for more information.

Tomorrow’s auteurs

See the work of teen moviemakers at the NH High School Short Film Festival

By Hannah Turtle

listings@hippopress.com

In its 14th year, the New Hampshire High School Short Film Festival has received more submissions than ever before, totalling more than six hours of film from across the state. The films submitted were created and produced entirely by high school students.

The festival, free to attend this year at Chunky’s Cinema Pub in Manchester, will show two hours of this year’s best student films, selected by a panel of 14 judges including teachers and industry experts.

Afterward, awards will be distributed to the top five films and the top two films will be shown at another festival this summer.

After two years of running the festival online, excitement for the in-person festival is particularly high. Mike Place, a veteran of the festival, spoke about what drove the high volume of submissions this year.

“Now that everyone’s back together, there was a big drive to work with other people, with classmates, to just make cool films,” Place said.

With the high volume of submissions this year, the competition was fierce, and narrowing it down was harder than ever.

“All 23 films that made it to the festival are definitely worth watching, they’re entertaining, they tell a story, some of them are just amazing. I even received a couple of phone calls from the judges asking if a few were done by professionals,” Place said. “Some of the films deal with common themes for teenagers — bullying, mental health — and some are just weird, David Lynch-style.”

Michael Shaughnessy, a film teacher at Merrimack High School, has 10 students involved in the festival this year, and is looking forward to having them share their work with the community.

“I want them to recognize that they are part of a larger community of people that create,” Shaughnessy said. “When they go to an event like this, they get to see all the different styles and ability levels. They can see where they have gifts and where they excel, as well as where they need work.”

Gabriella Faro and Tyler Kuslaka, seniors from Salem and Windham respectively, worked together on a film called Second Chances.

“The film is about a girl who gets murdered and gets a second chance in order to find out who did it,” Faro said.

“Our film, on a deeper level, is really about karma. We focused on making it have a deeper meaning than just a ‘high school short film,’” Kuslaka said. “I really hope the audience sees that. I was really inspired by Quentin Tarantino, by those endings that nobody ever sees coming.”

The students particularly enjoyed the filmmaking process, all remarking that the challenges of production helped them to grow as students and filmmakers. The students seemed keen on making the best films possible, hoping to distinguish their work from what one might expect from high school students.

“We put our whole heart and soul into the film,” Faro said.

As for their futures, both Faro and Kuslaka plan to study film in college. Faro will attend Curry College in the fall to study film and communications, and Kuslaka will attend Mount Saint Mary’s University to study film production as well as acting.

This was a common theme among students with work in the festival. Karen Robinson, a media production teacher at Londonderry High School with students in the festival, has four seniors this year, all with plans to pursue some aspect of filmmaking in the fall.

Robinson’s students, all part of a film club at LHS, submitted a film called Pressing Engagement, a comedy about two people who encounter increasingly strange circumstances on their way to a date.

Ahna Gainey and Joshua Truesdale, two LHS seniors, emphasized how much they enjoyed collaborating on the project.

“Our crew worked so well together. I’m just so appreciative of everyone on that team. There’s no way this could have been possible without everyone working together,” Gainey said.

Both Gainey and Truesdale are looking forward to the festival — though for different reasons.

“Last year, it was all on YouTube, which was disappointing. I’m excited to be in an environment with other student filmmakers, and to see everyone’s faces,” said Truesdale.

“Frankly, I’m just excited to see who won,” said Gainey.

New Hampshire High School Short Film Festival
When: Sunday, May 22, at 12:30 p.m. (doors open at 11:30 a.m.)
Where: Chunky’s Cinema Pub, 707 Huse Road, Manchester
Tickets: Tickets are free
More info: nhmediateachers.org

Featured photo: Courtesy photo.

The Art Roundup 22/05/12

The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

Sculptors arrive: The 15th annual Nashua International Sculpture Symposium commences with an opening event on Thursday, May 12, at 5:30 p.m., at the Picker Artists studios (3 Pine St. in Nashua), where you can meet this year’s artists, Anna Miller from Connecticut, Brent Howard from New Jersey and Corinna D’Schoto from Massachusetts. The artists will spend the next few weeks creating three outdoor sculptures based on the theme of “Merriment” for permanent installation in the city. The public is invited to watch them work at the studios Monday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 16 through June 1. Visit nashuasculpturesymposium.org.

Poems in nature: The Monadnock Writers’ Group will have the award ceremony for its Poetry in the Pines contest on Saturday, May 14, at 10 a.m., at Cathedral of the Pines (10 Hale Hill Road, Rindge). The contest invited poets to submit short poems of no more than eight lines about nature in New England. Winning poets will read their poems at the event. Visit monadnockwriters.org.

Learn oil painting: The League of NH Craftsmen Meredith Fine Craft Gallery (279 Daniel Webster Hwy., Meredith) will host a two-part landscape oil painting workshop with Ann Xavier on Sundays, May 15 and May 22, from noon to 2 p.m. Participants will learn about oil painting paints, canvases, brushes and pallets. Sample photos to paint from will be provided. The cost is $70, plus a $35 materials fee, paid to the instructor on the day of the first session. Space is limited, and registration is required. Call 279-7920 or visit meredith.nhcrafts.org/classes.

Live opera: The Raylynmor Opera presents Gioachino Rossini’s La Cenerentola (Cinderella) at The Park Theatre (19 Main St., Jaffrey) on Friday, May 13, and Saturday, May 14, at 7:30 p.m. The opera, co-produced by Salt Marsh Opera, will be performed with English libretto by Ben Robinson. It will be preceded by a fashion runway show with “paparazzi” at 7 p.m., and followed by a cocktail party with the performers. Tickets range from $25 to $45. Visit raylynmor.com/la-cenerentola.

Theatrical disaster
The Manchester Community Theatre Players present The Play That Goes Wrong at the Manchester Community Theatre Players Theatre, located at the North End Montessori School (698 Beech St., Manchester), with showtimes on Fridays, May 13 and May 20, and Saturdays, May 14 and May 21, at 7:30 p.m. In this comedy, anything that can go wrong does as a drama society attempts to stage a 1920s murder mystery. Tickets cost $20 and must be purchased in advance. Masks and proof of vaccination are required to enter the theater. Visit manchestercommunitytheatre.com or call 327-6777.

Detective thriller: New Hampshire Theatre Project presents An Inspector Calls at West End Studio Theatre (959 Islington St., Portsmouth) now through May 22, with showtimes on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The detective thriller, set in England in the early 1900s, is “written like an Agatha Christie-type mystery,” according to director Genevieve Aichele. “It’s a well-paced, clever play with excellent dialogue,” she told the Hippo in April. “The script is excellent, the characters are fascinating and the story is absolutely pertinent to our world today.”Tickets cost $30 ($33.26 with fees) for general admission and $26 ($29 with fees) for seniors, students and veterans and must be purchased in advance. Masks are required in the theater. Visit nhtheatreproject.org or call 431-6644.

Sheep trick
Head to the Deerfield Fairgrounds (34 Stage Road in Deerfield) to meet some sheep and learn all about the state’s fiber industry during the 44th annual New Hampshire Sheep & Wool Festival, happening on Saturday, May 14, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and on Sunday, May 15, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hosted by the New Hampshire Sheep and Wool Growers Association, the two-day event features a variety of demonstrations, 4-H competitions and information booths. Educational workshops are also planned, covering everything from sheep shearing and skirting alpaca fleece to spinning wool into yarn, sheep and alpaca health and more. Admission to the festival is $10 per person and free for kids ages 12 and under (no pets are allowed). A full schedule of happenings throughout the two days is available to view at nhswga.org.

Broadway and more: The New Hampshire Philharmonic Orchestra performs its Spring Pops concert at Seifert Performing Arts Center (44 Geremonty Drive, Salem) on Saturday, May 21, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, May 22, at 2 p.m. The program will feature pieces by women composers, including Joan Tower’s “Made in America;” as well as Broadway tunes by Stephen Sondheim and music by Star Wars score composer John Williams. Tickets cost $30 for adults, $25 for seniors and $8 for students. Visit nhphil.org or call 647-6476.

Suessical auditions: Powerhouse Theatre Collaborative is holding auditions for adults and children ages 6+ for its summer musical, Seussical the Musical!, on Sunday, May 15, and Monday, May 16, at the Belknap Mill (25 Beacon St. East in Laconia).Find information on audition times, the registration form and how to prepare at belknapmill.org/seussical. The show will take place Aug. 12 through Aug. 14 and rehearsals will begin in June, according to a press release.

Absurd murder
The Majestic Academy of Dramatic Arts presents Lucky Stiffsat the Derry Opera House (29 W. Broadway, Derry), with showtimes on Friday, May 13, and Saturday, May 14, at 7 p.m., and Sunday, May 15, at 2 p.m. The murder mystery farce follows an English shoe salesman who is forced to take the embalmed body of his recently murdered uncle on a vacation to Monte Carlo and pass him off as a living person. Tickets cost $18 for adults, $15 for seniors age 65 and up and $12 for youth age 17 and under. Call 669-7469 or visit majestictheatre.net.

90 voices: The Rockingham Choral Society will perform two spring concerts this weekend — Saturday, May 14, at 8 p.m. at Sanborn Regional High School in Kingston and Sunday, May 15, at 3:30 p.m. at Christ Church Episcopal in Exeter, according to a press release which said each will feature Mozart’s “Requieum” sung by more than 90 voices and accompanied by a full orchestra. Tickets cost $15 (children 6 and under are free). Tickets are available in advance at rockinghamchoral.org; tickets will be available at the door for Saturday’s performance (Sunday’s performance has limited seating capacity).


ART

Exhibits

• “ECHOES & REFLECTIONS: FROM ABSTRACT PAINTING TO MODERN QUILTING AND BEYOND” exhibition features abstract paintings inspired by the bold colors, asymmetry, improvisational layout, alternate grid work and negative space in composition of modern quilting. Two Villages Art Society (Bates Building, 846 Main St., Contoocook). On display now through May 14. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372 for more information.

• “IMPACT! ABSTRACT! Exhibition featuring the abstract work of six local artists, including Ann Saunderson, who works in acrylic, mixed media, oil and cold wax and monotype; Daniela Wenzel, who does oil painting, assemblage, ink drawing, driftwood pyrography and improvised quilt-making; Kate Higley, who does printmaking; Ethel Hills, who works in acrylic; and Grace Mattern, who does mixed media collage. Twiggs Gallery (254 King St., Boscawen). On view now through May 28. Gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com or call 975-0015.

• “APPEAL OF THE REAL: 19TH CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD” exhibition features photographs taken throughout the Mediterranean to record the ruins of ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through June 12. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “WARHOL SCREEN TESTS” In the mid-1960s, American multimedia artist Andy Warhol had shot more than 400 short, silent, black-and-white films of his friends at his studio in New York City. Warhol referred to the films, which were unscripted and played in slow motion, as “film portraits” or “stillies.” The exhibition will feature 20 of those films, provided by the Andy Warhol Museum, in loops across four large-scale projections. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through July 3. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “ARGHAVAN KHOSRAVI” Artist’s surrealist paintings explore themes of exile, freedom and empowerment; center female protagonists; and allude to human rights issues, particularly those affecting women and immigrants. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through Sept. 5. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “THE PEOPLE’S SCULPTOR: THE LIFE AND WORKS OF JOHN ROGERS” Exhibit celebrates the art of American sculptor John Rogers, who came to Manchester in 1850, and explores the influence that Manchester had on Rogers’ life and work. Presented by the Manchester Historic Association. On view now through September. Millyard Museum (200 Bedford St., Manchester). Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission costs $8 for adults, $6 for seniors age 62 and up and college students, $4 for youth ages 12 through 18, and is free for kids under age 12. Call 622-7531 or visit manchesterhistoric.org/millyard-museum.

• “NATURE AT NIGHT: PAINTINGS BY OWEN KRZYZANIAK GEARY” Two Villages Art Society (46 Main St., Contoocook). On display from May 27 through June 18. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372 for more information.

ART ON MAIN The City of Concord and the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce present a year-round outdoor public art exhibition in Concord’s downtown featuring works by professional sculptors. All sculptures will be for sale. Visit concordnhchamber.com/creativeconcord, call 224-2508 or email tsink@concordnhchamber.com for more information.

Workshops and classes

• “BLACKSMITHING BASICS” Beginner level workshop. Sanborn Mills Farm(7097 Sanborn Road, Loudon). Fri., May 20, through Sun., May 22, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. The cost is $375. Call 435-7314 or visit sanbornmills.org for more information.

THEATRE

Shows

LUCKY STIFFS The Majestic Academy of Dramatic Arts presents. Derry Opera House (29 W. Broadway, Derry). Showtimes on Fri., May 12, and Sat., May 14, 7 p.m., and Sun., May 15, 2 p.m. Tickets cost $18 for adults, $15 for seniors age 65 and up and $12 for youth age 17 and under. Call 669-7469 or visit majestictheatre.net.

THE PRODUCERS A mainstage production of the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester). Now through May 15, with showtimes on Friday at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at noon. Tickets cost $39 to $46. Call 668-5588 or visit palacetheatre.org.

AN INSPECTOR CALLS Presented by New Hampshire Theatre Project. West End Studio Theatre (959 Islington St., Portsmouth). Now through May 22, with showtimes on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $30 ($33.26 with fees) for general admission, $26 ($29 with fees) for seniors, students and veterans and must be purchased in advance. Masks are required in the theater. Visit nhtheatreproject.org or call 431-6644.

THE PLAY THAT GOES WRONG Presented by the Manchester Community Theatre Players, located at the North End Montessori School (698 Beech St., Manchester). Showtimes on Fri., May 13 and May 20, and Sat., May 14 and May 21, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $20 and must be purchased in advance. Masks and proof of vaccination are required to enter the theater. Visit manchestercommunitytheatre.com.

CHILDREN OF THE GRIM Presented by Bitter Pill. Players’ Ring Theatre (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth). May 13 through June 5, with showtimes on Fridays at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Tickets cost $28 for adults and $25 for seniors age 65 and up and students. Masks and proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test are required. Visit playersring.org or call 436-8123.

THE BALD SOPRANO Produced by the Community Players of Concord. The Hatbox Theatre (located inside the Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Fri., June 17 through Sun., June 26. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com or call 715-2315 for more information.

CLASSICAL

SPRING POPS BROADWAY AND MORE The New Hampshire Philharmonic Orchestra performs. Seifert Performing Arts Center, 44 Geremonty Drive, Salem. Sat., May 21, at 7:30 p.m., and Sun., May 22, at 2 p.m. Visit nhphil.org or call 647-6476 for more information.

Open calls

THE RHYTHM OF NEW HAMPSHIRE SHOW CHORUS Women’s a cappella chorus is looking for female singers in the region to join. The group, an affiliate of the North American singing organization Harmony, Inc., performs a wide variety of music, including Broadway musical songs, patriotic songs, pop, jazz and seasonal pieces, for community and veterans’ events and private functions. Rehearsals are held weekly on Thursdays from 6:45 to 8:30 p.m. at the Marion Gerrish Community Center, 39 W. Broadway, Derry. Masks are required for singing, but both vaccinated and unvaccinated singers are welcome. Visit rnhchorus.org or email info@rnhchorus.org for more information.

The Art Roundup 22/05/05

The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

Open studios: Art Up Front Street Studios & Gallery (120 Front St., Exeter), an artists’ collective consisting of eight working artist studios, will host its Spring Open Studios event on Saturday, May 7, and Sunday, May 8, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., each day. Browse a variety of small and large art pieces, prints and originals, handcrafted jewelry, assemblages, cards, metal sculpture, industrial quilts and more. There will also be live music, free drawings and light refreshments. Call 418-6286 or visit artupfrontstreet.com.

Art raffle: Tickets are on sale now for the Currier Museum of Art’s 2022 signature raffle. The winner will receive an art piece from Roberto Lugo, a Philadelphia-based potter, painter, social activist, spoken word poet and educator. Lugo’s pottery, which was featured in a special exhibit at the Manchester museum last summer, reimagines traditional forms and techniques with inspiration from urban graffiti and hip-hop culture. Tickets cost $100 each. The drawing will be done on Saturday, May 14. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

Veteran reflections: The Wright Museum of World War II (77 Center St., Wolfeboro) will host a lecture and book signing with author Andrew Biggio on Tuesday, May 10, from 7 to 8 p.m. In his book The Rifle, Biggio chronicles his journey as a 28-year-old U.S. Marine who, after returning home from combat in Afghanistan and Iraq, set out to document the stories of surviving World War II veterans. Seating is limited, and reservations are required. Admission costs $5 for museum members and $10 for non-members. Call 569-1212 or visit wrightmuseum.org.

Spy music: Symphony New Hampshire presents a concert, “The Music of James Bond,” at the Keefe Center for the Arts (117 Elm St., Nashua) on Saturday, May 7, from 7:30 to 8:50 p.m., featuring music from five decades of James Bond films by iconic songwriters like Shirley Bassey, Paul McCartney, Carly Simon and Adele. The performance will begin with “Themes from 007, a Medley for Orchestra,” which includes the themes “Goldfinger,” “You Only Live Twice,” “For Your Eyes Only” and “From Russia with Love,” followed by themes from other spy film favorites, including Mission Impossible, The Pink Panther and Raiders of the Lost Ark. Tickets cost $20 to $60 for adults and $18 to $55 for seniors age 65 and up. Children are admitted for free with a paying adult. Visit symphonynh.org or call 595-9156 for more information.

Last Gas
The Community Players of Concord present Last Gas at the Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord) on Friday, May 6, and Saturday, May 7, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, May 8, at 2 p.m. A Red Sox-loving dad and convenience store manager must make a choice when he gets a chance to rekindle a romance with an old flame. Tickets cost $18 for adults, $16 for youth ages 17 and under and $16 for seniors age 65 and up. Visit communityplayersofconcord.org or call 224-4905.

• “The worst play ever written:” There’s still time to catch a performance of The Producers at The Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester). The musical comedy, based on the 1967 Mel Brooks movie of the same name, runs through May 15, with showtimes on Fridays at 7:30 p.m., Saturdays at 2 and 7:30 p.m., and Sundays at noon. Tickets range from $39 to $46. Call 668-5588 or visit palacetheatre.org.

Multimedia exhibit: Two Villages Art Society (Bates Building, 846 Main St., Contoocook) has an exhibition, “Echoes & Reflections: From Abstract Painting to Modern Quilting and Beyond,” on view now through May 14. It features the works of four painters, four quilters, four poets and two musicians. Visitors can listen to the poems and music, with comments from the artists, by scanning QR codes with a smartphone. “This blend of artistic mediums is something we haven’t tried before,” exhibit curator Rick Lugg said in a press release. “We hope this will enhance the exhibit and highlight the connections and resonances among these works.” Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372.


ART

Fairs and markets

CRAFTSMEN’S FAIR The annual nine-day outdoor craft fair hosted by the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen features hundreds of craftspeople with vendor booths, plus special craft exhibitions, demonstrations, hands-on workshops and more. Sat., Aug. 6 through Sun., Aug. 14. Mount Sunapee Resort, 1398 Route 103, Newbury. Call 224-3375 or visit nhcrafts.org for more information.

CONCORD ARTS MARKET The juried outdoor artisan and fine art market runs one Saturday a month, June through October, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Market dates are June 11, July 30, Aug. 20, Sept. 17 and Oct. 15. Rollins Park, 33 Bow St., Concord. concordartsmarket.net. The first market will be held on Saturday, June 11. Visit concordartsmarket.net/summer-arts-market.html for more information.

Special events

SPRING OPEN STUDIOS Art Up Front Street Studios & Gallery, 120 Front St., Exeter. The artists’ collective features seven working artist studios. Sat., May 7, and Sun., May 8, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 418-6286 or visit artupfrontstreet.com for more information.

Workshops and classes

• “BLACKSMITHING BASICS” Beginner level workshop. Sanborn Mills Farm(7097 Sanborn Road, Loudon). Fri., May 20, through Sun., May 22, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. The cost is $375. Call 435-7314 or visit sanbornmills.org for more information.

• “INTRO TO 3D PRINTING” Port City Makerspace (68 Morning St., Portsmouth). Wed., June 8, from 6 to 9 p.m. The cost is $25 for members of the makerspace and $45 for nonmembers. Call 373-1002 or visit portcitymakerspace.com for more information.

ART CLASSES Art classes for teens and adults, including Pottery, Stained Glass, Intermediate Watercolor and Clay Hand Building. Studio 550 Art Center (550 Elm St., Manchester). Five-week sessions. Classes met for two hours a week. Call 232-5597 or visit 550arts.com for the full schedule and cost details.

DRAWING & PAINTING CLASSES Art House Studios, 66 Hanover St., Suite 202, Manchester. Classes include Drawing Fundamentals, Painting in Acrylic, Drawing: Observation to Abstraction, Exploring Mixed Media, and Figure Drawing. Class sizes are limited to six students. Visit arthousestudios.org or email arthousejb@gmail.comfor more information.

GENERAL ART CLASSES Weekly art classes offered for both kids and adults of all skill levels and cover a variety of two-dimensional media, including drawing and painting with pastel, acrylic, watercolor and oils. Classes are held with small groups of three to eight to five students. Diane Crespo Fine Art Gallery (32 Hanover St., Manchester). Kids classes, open to ages 10 and up, are held on Thursdays and Fridays, from 4:15 to 5:45 p.m. Adult classes are held on Thursdays, from 6:30 to 8:15 p.m., and Saturdays from 10:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Tuition is pay-as-you-go at $20 per student per class, due upon arrival. Call 493-1677 or visit dianecrespofineart.com for availability.

THEATRE

Shows

THE PRODUCERS A mainstage production of the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester). Now through May 15, with showtimes on Friday at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at noon. Tickets cost $39 to $46. Call 668-5588 or visit palacetheatre.org.

AN INSPECTOR CALLS Presented by New Hampshire Theatre Project. West End Studio Theatre (959 Islington St., Portsmouth). May 6 through May 22, with showtimes on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $30 ($33.26 with fees) for general admission, $26 ($29 with fees) for seniors, students and veterans and must be purchased in advance. Masks are required in the theater. Visit nhtheatreproject.org or call 431-6644.

THE PLAY THAT GOES WRONG Presented by the Manchester Community Theatre Players. Manchester Community Theatre Players Theatre, located at the North End Montessori School (698 Beech St., Manchester). Showtimes on Fri., May 13 and May 20, and Sat., May 14 and May 21, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $20 and must be purchased in advance. Masks and proof of vaccination are required to enter the theater. Visit manchestercommunitytheatre.com or call 327-6777.

CHILDREN OF THE GRIM Presented by Bitter Pill. Players’ Ring Theatre (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth). May 13 through June 5, with showtimes on Fridays at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Tickets cost $28 for adults and $25 for seniors age 65 and up and students. Masks and proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test are required. Visit playersring.org or call 436-8123.

THE BALD SOPRANO Produced by the Community Players of Concord. The Hatbox Theatre (located inside the Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Fri., June 17 through Sun., June 26. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com or call 715-2315 for more information.

TRUE TALES LIVE Portsmouth-based storytelling showcase. Monthly, last Tuesday (no shows in July and August), from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Shows will be held in person (Portsmouth Public Media TV Studio, 280 Marcy St., Portsmouth) starting in April, and returning to the Zoom format for the winter, starting in November. Each month’s showcase is centered around a different theme. The series is free and open to all who want to watch or participate as a storyteller. Pre-registration for attendees is required for Zoom shows but not required for in-person shows. Visit truetaleslivenh.org and email info@truetaleslive.org if you’re interested in being a storyteller.

Comic books for all

Free Comic Book Day returns

After two years of schedule changes, Free Comic Book Day returns to its first Saturday in May spot on the calendar this year with several local shops participating in the May 7 event.

The event, which began in 2002, has handed out millions of copies of special issues of comics created for Free Comic Book Day to people looking to find new stories or rediscover old favorites. Each shop has individual policies regarding how many releases one may take, and which books are available. (This year, there are more than 45 different issues scheduled to be available for Free Comic Book Day, according to freecomicbookday.com, where you can see covers and previews for 2022 comics.)

The day is intended to commemorate each shop and celebrate small businesses and their love for the art of comic books.

Double Midnight Comics, with stores in both Concord and Manchester, is hosting a couple of well-recognized guests to help celebrate this day and intrigue enthusiasts statewide. Its Manchester store will celebrate 20 years in business this July; the Concord store opened eight years ago, relocating from Main Street to Loudon Road this past October.

“[For] our Manchester store, we bill it as a big … extravaganza,” store owner Chris Proulx said. “We had people, pre-Covid, who would line up on Wednesday. There’s people [who] will camp out for a few days ahead of time. … It almost turns into a block party in our parking lot.”

Proulx has high hopes that this FCBD will enter back into the realm of normalcy, as the pandemic forced its cancellation in 2020 and rescheduling to the summer last year. Unfortunately, this led to a much smaller turnout compared to previous years. Proulx said that the Concord location will be for customers looking to simply stop by and look around at their own pace. It is more of an ideal location for younger kids in need of more of a relaxed browsing scene. Proulx looks forward to the release of The Electric Black, which was produced by New Englanders Joseph Schmalke and Rich Woodall, both of whom will appear at the Manchester store that day.

Comics for…
Five comics for kids
• Avatar: The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra
• The Best Archie Comic Ever! (limited-edition issue)
• Disney Masters: Donald Duck & Co. (special-edition issue)
• Pokemon Journeys and Pokemon Adventures XY
• Sonic the Hedgehog
Three comics for Marvel lovers
• The Amazing Spider-Man/Venom (issue No. 1)
• Avengers/X-Men (issue No. 1)
• Marvel’s Voices (issue No. 1)
Three comics with action
• Tex in The Land of the Seminoles
• The Year of the Valiant
• Bloodborne (issue No. 1)

Jetpack Comics & Games in Rochester is another local shop anticipating a substantial turnout for FCBD this year. Store manager Rich Brunelle described the event as a citywide attraction, saying that they look to help promote other small businesses by hiding comics at various locations.

inside of comic book store
Double Midnight Comics in Manchester and Concord. Photos by Jack Walsh.

“We have a ton of businesses around town that are involved in it as well,” Brunelle said. “We basically treat it like a scavenger hunt, where you can go to each one of the businesses, and at each one they give you more free comics.”

Brunelle said those who take part in the scavenger hunt and pick up a comic from each business are eligible for special prizes once the search is complete. In addition to this day-long scavenger hunt, there is a cosplay contest, a mini convention hall at Governor’s Inn, food trucks and more. A couple of guests include legends Steve Lavigne and Jim Lawson, best-known for their work in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comics. Brunelle added that this particular location once held the largest FCBD in the country.

After battling some hardships FCBD is back, and fans statewide should plan on attending fun events with no limitations on any of the festivities planned throughout the day.

Free Comic Book Day

When: Saturday, May 7
Where: Various participating stores statewide
More info: Visit freecomicbookday.com

Participating local stores
See freecomicbookday.com for a look at the 2022 line up of comics.

Chris’s Comics (919 Lafayette Road, Seabrook, 474-2283, chriscardscomics.com) Open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Free Comic Book Day.

Double Midnight Comics (245 Maple St., Manchester, 669-9636; 341 Loudon Road, Concord, 715-2683; dmcomics.com) Open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in Manchester and from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Concord on Free Comic Book Day. The Manchester store will host its annual “Free Comic Book Day Extravaganza,” featuring a tent sale, a costume contest, comic creator signings, door prizes and more.

Escape Hatch Books (27 Main St., Jaffrey, find them on Facebook @escapehatchbooks)

Jetpack Comics & Games (37 N. Main St., Rochester, 330-9636, jetpackcomics.com) Open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Free Comic Book Day. The shop is the nexus of a citywide festival featuring a comic scavenger hunt, a cosplay contest, a mini convention hall at Governor’s Inn, door prizes, food trucks and more.

Merrymac Games and Comics (550 Daniel Webster Hwy., Merrimack, 420-8161, merrymacgc.com) Open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Free Comic Book Day, featuring appearances from a variety of local, independent comic creators.

Stairway to Heaven Comics (105 Gosling Road, Newington, 319-6134, stairwaytoheavencomics.com) Open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Free Comic Book Day, featuring sales on bagged and boarded comics, creator signings and more.

Featured photo: Double Midnight Comics in Manchester and Concord. Photos by Jack Walsh.

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