The Art Roundup 22/05/12

The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

Sculptors arrive: The 15th annual Nashua International Sculpture Symposium commences with an opening event on Thursday, May 12, at 5:30 p.m., at the Picker Artists studios (3 Pine St. in Nashua), where you can meet this year’s artists, Anna Miller from Connecticut, Brent Howard from New Jersey and Corinna D’Schoto from Massachusetts. The artists will spend the next few weeks creating three outdoor sculptures based on the theme of “Merriment” for permanent installation in the city. The public is invited to watch them work at the studios Monday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 16 through June 1. Visit nashuasculpturesymposium.org.

Poems in nature: The Monadnock Writers’ Group will have the award ceremony for its Poetry in the Pines contest on Saturday, May 14, at 10 a.m., at Cathedral of the Pines (10 Hale Hill Road, Rindge). The contest invited poets to submit short poems of no more than eight lines about nature in New England. Winning poets will read their poems at the event. Visit monadnockwriters.org.

Learn oil painting: The League of NH Craftsmen Meredith Fine Craft Gallery (279 Daniel Webster Hwy., Meredith) will host a two-part landscape oil painting workshop with Ann Xavier on Sundays, May 15 and May 22, from noon to 2 p.m. Participants will learn about oil painting paints, canvases, brushes and pallets. Sample photos to paint from will be provided. The cost is $70, plus a $35 materials fee, paid to the instructor on the day of the first session. Space is limited, and registration is required. Call 279-7920 or visit meredith.nhcrafts.org/classes.

Live opera: The Raylynmor Opera presents Gioachino Rossini’s La Cenerentola (Cinderella) at The Park Theatre (19 Main St., Jaffrey) on Friday, May 13, and Saturday, May 14, at 7:30 p.m. The opera, co-produced by Salt Marsh Opera, will be performed with English libretto by Ben Robinson. It will be preceded by a fashion runway show with “paparazzi” at 7 p.m., and followed by a cocktail party with the performers. Tickets range from $25 to $45. Visit raylynmor.com/la-cenerentola.

Theatrical disaster
The Manchester Community Theatre Players present The Play That Goes Wrong at the Manchester Community Theatre Players Theatre, located at the North End Montessori School (698 Beech St., Manchester), with showtimes on Fridays, May 13 and May 20, and Saturdays, May 14 and May 21, at 7:30 p.m. In this comedy, anything that can go wrong does as a drama society attempts to stage a 1920s murder mystery. Tickets cost $20 and must be purchased in advance. Masks and proof of vaccination are required to enter the theater. Visit manchestercommunitytheatre.com or call 327-6777.

Detective thriller: New Hampshire Theatre Project presents An Inspector Calls at West End Studio Theatre (959 Islington St., Portsmouth) now through May 22, with showtimes on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The detective thriller, set in England in the early 1900s, is “written like an Agatha Christie-type mystery,” according to director Genevieve Aichele. “It’s a well-paced, clever play with excellent dialogue,” she told the Hippo in April. “The script is excellent, the characters are fascinating and the story is absolutely pertinent to our world today.”Tickets cost $30 ($33.26 with fees) for general admission and $26 ($29 with fees) for seniors, students and veterans and must be purchased in advance. Masks are required in the theater. Visit nhtheatreproject.org or call 431-6644.

Sheep trick
Head to the Deerfield Fairgrounds (34 Stage Road in Deerfield) to meet some sheep and learn all about the state’s fiber industry during the 44th annual New Hampshire Sheep & Wool Festival, happening on Saturday, May 14, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and on Sunday, May 15, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hosted by the New Hampshire Sheep and Wool Growers Association, the two-day event features a variety of demonstrations, 4-H competitions and information booths. Educational workshops are also planned, covering everything from sheep shearing and skirting alpaca fleece to spinning wool into yarn, sheep and alpaca health and more. Admission to the festival is $10 per person and free for kids ages 12 and under (no pets are allowed). A full schedule of happenings throughout the two days is available to view at nhswga.org.

Broadway and more: The New Hampshire Philharmonic Orchestra performs its Spring Pops concert at Seifert Performing Arts Center (44 Geremonty Drive, Salem) on Saturday, May 21, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, May 22, at 2 p.m. The program will feature pieces by women composers, including Joan Tower’s “Made in America;” as well as Broadway tunes by Stephen Sondheim and music by Star Wars score composer John Williams. Tickets cost $30 for adults, $25 for seniors and $8 for students. Visit nhphil.org or call 647-6476.

Suessical auditions: Powerhouse Theatre Collaborative is holding auditions for adults and children ages 6+ for its summer musical, Seussical the Musical!, on Sunday, May 15, and Monday, May 16, at the Belknap Mill (25 Beacon St. East in Laconia).Find information on audition times, the registration form and how to prepare at belknapmill.org/seussical. The show will take place Aug. 12 through Aug. 14 and rehearsals will begin in June, according to a press release.

Absurd murder
The Majestic Academy of Dramatic Arts presents Lucky Stiffsat the Derry Opera House (29 W. Broadway, Derry), with showtimes on Friday, May 13, and Saturday, May 14, at 7 p.m., and Sunday, May 15, at 2 p.m. The murder mystery farce follows an English shoe salesman who is forced to take the embalmed body of his recently murdered uncle on a vacation to Monte Carlo and pass him off as a living person. Tickets cost $18 for adults, $15 for seniors age 65 and up and $12 for youth age 17 and under. Call 669-7469 or visit majestictheatre.net.

90 voices: The Rockingham Choral Society will perform two spring concerts this weekend — Saturday, May 14, at 8 p.m. at Sanborn Regional High School in Kingston and Sunday, May 15, at 3:30 p.m. at Christ Church Episcopal in Exeter, according to a press release which said each will feature Mozart’s “Requieum” sung by more than 90 voices and accompanied by a full orchestra. Tickets cost $15 (children 6 and under are free). Tickets are available in advance at rockinghamchoral.org; tickets will be available at the door for Saturday’s performance (Sunday’s performance has limited seating capacity).


ART

Exhibits

• “ECHOES & REFLECTIONS: FROM ABSTRACT PAINTING TO MODERN QUILTING AND BEYOND” exhibition features abstract paintings inspired by the bold colors, asymmetry, improvisational layout, alternate grid work and negative space in composition of modern quilting. Two Villages Art Society (Bates Building, 846 Main St., Contoocook). On display now through May 14. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372 for more information.

• “IMPACT! ABSTRACT! Exhibition featuring the abstract work of six local artists, including Ann Saunderson, who works in acrylic, mixed media, oil and cold wax and monotype; Daniela Wenzel, who does oil painting, assemblage, ink drawing, driftwood pyrography and improvised quilt-making; Kate Higley, who does printmaking; Ethel Hills, who works in acrylic; and Grace Mattern, who does mixed media collage. Twiggs Gallery (254 King St., Boscawen). On view now through May 28. Gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com or call 975-0015.

• “APPEAL OF THE REAL: 19TH CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD” exhibition features photographs taken throughout the Mediterranean to record the ruins of ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through June 12. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “WARHOL SCREEN TESTS” In the mid-1960s, American multimedia artist Andy Warhol had shot more than 400 short, silent, black-and-white films of his friends at his studio in New York City. Warhol referred to the films, which were unscripted and played in slow motion, as “film portraits” or “stillies.” The exhibition will feature 20 of those films, provided by the Andy Warhol Museum, in loops across four large-scale projections. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through July 3. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “ARGHAVAN KHOSRAVI” Artist’s surrealist paintings explore themes of exile, freedom and empowerment; center female protagonists; and allude to human rights issues, particularly those affecting women and immigrants. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through Sept. 5. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “THE PEOPLE’S SCULPTOR: THE LIFE AND WORKS OF JOHN ROGERS” Exhibit celebrates the art of American sculptor John Rogers, who came to Manchester in 1850, and explores the influence that Manchester had on Rogers’ life and work. Presented by the Manchester Historic Association. On view now through September. Millyard Museum (200 Bedford St., Manchester). Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission costs $8 for adults, $6 for seniors age 62 and up and college students, $4 for youth ages 12 through 18, and is free for kids under age 12. Call 622-7531 or visit manchesterhistoric.org/millyard-museum.

• “NATURE AT NIGHT: PAINTINGS BY OWEN KRZYZANIAK GEARY” Two Villages Art Society (46 Main St., Contoocook). On display from May 27 through June 18. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372 for more information.

ART ON MAIN The City of Concord and the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce present a year-round outdoor public art exhibition in Concord’s downtown featuring works by professional sculptors. All sculptures will be for sale. Visit concordnhchamber.com/creativeconcord, call 224-2508 or email tsink@concordnhchamber.com for more information.

Workshops and classes

• “BLACKSMITHING BASICS” Beginner level workshop. Sanborn Mills Farm(7097 Sanborn Road, Loudon). Fri., May 20, through Sun., May 22, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. The cost is $375. Call 435-7314 or visit sanbornmills.org for more information.

THEATRE

Shows

LUCKY STIFFS The Majestic Academy of Dramatic Arts presents. Derry Opera House (29 W. Broadway, Derry). Showtimes on Fri., May 12, and Sat., May 14, 7 p.m., and Sun., May 15, 2 p.m. Tickets cost $18 for adults, $15 for seniors age 65 and up and $12 for youth age 17 and under. Call 669-7469 or visit majestictheatre.net.

THE PRODUCERS A mainstage production of the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester). Now through May 15, with showtimes on Friday at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at noon. Tickets cost $39 to $46. Call 668-5588 or visit palacetheatre.org.

AN INSPECTOR CALLS Presented by New Hampshire Theatre Project. West End Studio Theatre (959 Islington St., Portsmouth). Now through May 22, with showtimes on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $30 ($33.26 with fees) for general admission, $26 ($29 with fees) for seniors, students and veterans and must be purchased in advance. Masks are required in the theater. Visit nhtheatreproject.org or call 431-6644.

THE PLAY THAT GOES WRONG Presented by the Manchester Community Theatre Players, located at the North End Montessori School (698 Beech St., Manchester). Showtimes on Fri., May 13 and May 20, and Sat., May 14 and May 21, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $20 and must be purchased in advance. Masks and proof of vaccination are required to enter the theater. Visit manchestercommunitytheatre.com.

CHILDREN OF THE GRIM Presented by Bitter Pill. Players’ Ring Theatre (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth). May 13 through June 5, with showtimes on Fridays at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Tickets cost $28 for adults and $25 for seniors age 65 and up and students. Masks and proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test are required. Visit playersring.org or call 436-8123.

THE BALD SOPRANO Produced by the Community Players of Concord. The Hatbox Theatre (located inside the Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Fri., June 17 through Sun., June 26. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com or call 715-2315 for more information.

CLASSICAL

SPRING POPS BROADWAY AND MORE The New Hampshire Philharmonic Orchestra performs. Seifert Performing Arts Center, 44 Geremonty Drive, Salem. Sat., May 21, at 7:30 p.m., and Sun., May 22, at 2 p.m. Visit nhphil.org or call 647-6476 for more information.

Open calls

THE RHYTHM OF NEW HAMPSHIRE SHOW CHORUS Women’s a cappella chorus is looking for female singers in the region to join. The group, an affiliate of the North American singing organization Harmony, Inc., performs a wide variety of music, including Broadway musical songs, patriotic songs, pop, jazz and seasonal pieces, for community and veterans’ events and private functions. Rehearsals are held weekly on Thursdays from 6:45 to 8:30 p.m. at the Marion Gerrish Community Center, 39 W. Broadway, Derry. Masks are required for singing, but both vaccinated and unvaccinated singers are welcome. Visit rnhchorus.org or email info@rnhchorus.org for more information.

The Art Roundup 22/05/05

The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

Open studios: Art Up Front Street Studios & Gallery (120 Front St., Exeter), an artists’ collective consisting of eight working artist studios, will host its Spring Open Studios event on Saturday, May 7, and Sunday, May 8, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., each day. Browse a variety of small and large art pieces, prints and originals, handcrafted jewelry, assemblages, cards, metal sculpture, industrial quilts and more. There will also be live music, free drawings and light refreshments. Call 418-6286 or visit artupfrontstreet.com.

Art raffle: Tickets are on sale now for the Currier Museum of Art’s 2022 signature raffle. The winner will receive an art piece from Roberto Lugo, a Philadelphia-based potter, painter, social activist, spoken word poet and educator. Lugo’s pottery, which was featured in a special exhibit at the Manchester museum last summer, reimagines traditional forms and techniques with inspiration from urban graffiti and hip-hop culture. Tickets cost $100 each. The drawing will be done on Saturday, May 14. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

Veteran reflections: The Wright Museum of World War II (77 Center St., Wolfeboro) will host a lecture and book signing with author Andrew Biggio on Tuesday, May 10, from 7 to 8 p.m. In his book The Rifle, Biggio chronicles his journey as a 28-year-old U.S. Marine who, after returning home from combat in Afghanistan and Iraq, set out to document the stories of surviving World War II veterans. Seating is limited, and reservations are required. Admission costs $5 for museum members and $10 for non-members. Call 569-1212 or visit wrightmuseum.org.

Spy music: Symphony New Hampshire presents a concert, “The Music of James Bond,” at the Keefe Center for the Arts (117 Elm St., Nashua) on Saturday, May 7, from 7:30 to 8:50 p.m., featuring music from five decades of James Bond films by iconic songwriters like Shirley Bassey, Paul McCartney, Carly Simon and Adele. The performance will begin with “Themes from 007, a Medley for Orchestra,” which includes the themes “Goldfinger,” “You Only Live Twice,” “For Your Eyes Only” and “From Russia with Love,” followed by themes from other spy film favorites, including Mission Impossible, The Pink Panther and Raiders of the Lost Ark. Tickets cost $20 to $60 for adults and $18 to $55 for seniors age 65 and up. Children are admitted for free with a paying adult. Visit symphonynh.org or call 595-9156 for more information.

Last Gas
The Community Players of Concord present Last Gas at the Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord) on Friday, May 6, and Saturday, May 7, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, May 8, at 2 p.m. A Red Sox-loving dad and convenience store manager must make a choice when he gets a chance to rekindle a romance with an old flame. Tickets cost $18 for adults, $16 for youth ages 17 and under and $16 for seniors age 65 and up. Visit communityplayersofconcord.org or call 224-4905.

• “The worst play ever written:” There’s still time to catch a performance of The Producers at The Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester). The musical comedy, based on the 1967 Mel Brooks movie of the same name, runs through May 15, with showtimes on Fridays at 7:30 p.m., Saturdays at 2 and 7:30 p.m., and Sundays at noon. Tickets range from $39 to $46. Call 668-5588 or visit palacetheatre.org.

Multimedia exhibit: Two Villages Art Society (Bates Building, 846 Main St., Contoocook) has an exhibition, “Echoes & Reflections: From Abstract Painting to Modern Quilting and Beyond,” on view now through May 14. It features the works of four painters, four quilters, four poets and two musicians. Visitors can listen to the poems and music, with comments from the artists, by scanning QR codes with a smartphone. “This blend of artistic mediums is something we haven’t tried before,” exhibit curator Rick Lugg said in a press release. “We hope this will enhance the exhibit and highlight the connections and resonances among these works.” Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372.


ART

Fairs and markets

CRAFTSMEN’S FAIR The annual nine-day outdoor craft fair hosted by the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen features hundreds of craftspeople with vendor booths, plus special craft exhibitions, demonstrations, hands-on workshops and more. Sat., Aug. 6 through Sun., Aug. 14. Mount Sunapee Resort, 1398 Route 103, Newbury. Call 224-3375 or visit nhcrafts.org for more information.

CONCORD ARTS MARKET The juried outdoor artisan and fine art market runs one Saturday a month, June through October, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Market dates are June 11, July 30, Aug. 20, Sept. 17 and Oct. 15. Rollins Park, 33 Bow St., Concord. concordartsmarket.net. The first market will be held on Saturday, June 11. Visit concordartsmarket.net/summer-arts-market.html for more information.

Special events

SPRING OPEN STUDIOS Art Up Front Street Studios & Gallery, 120 Front St., Exeter. The artists’ collective features seven working artist studios. Sat., May 7, and Sun., May 8, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 418-6286 or visit artupfrontstreet.com for more information.

Workshops and classes

• “BLACKSMITHING BASICS” Beginner level workshop. Sanborn Mills Farm(7097 Sanborn Road, Loudon). Fri., May 20, through Sun., May 22, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. The cost is $375. Call 435-7314 or visit sanbornmills.org for more information.

• “INTRO TO 3D PRINTING” Port City Makerspace (68 Morning St., Portsmouth). Wed., June 8, from 6 to 9 p.m. The cost is $25 for members of the makerspace and $45 for nonmembers. Call 373-1002 or visit portcitymakerspace.com for more information.

ART CLASSES Art classes for teens and adults, including Pottery, Stained Glass, Intermediate Watercolor and Clay Hand Building. Studio 550 Art Center (550 Elm St., Manchester). Five-week sessions. Classes met for two hours a week. Call 232-5597 or visit 550arts.com for the full schedule and cost details.

DRAWING & PAINTING CLASSES Art House Studios, 66 Hanover St., Suite 202, Manchester. Classes include Drawing Fundamentals, Painting in Acrylic, Drawing: Observation to Abstraction, Exploring Mixed Media, and Figure Drawing. Class sizes are limited to six students. Visit arthousestudios.org or email arthousejb@gmail.comfor more information.

GENERAL ART CLASSES Weekly art classes offered for both kids and adults of all skill levels and cover a variety of two-dimensional media, including drawing and painting with pastel, acrylic, watercolor and oils. Classes are held with small groups of three to eight to five students. Diane Crespo Fine Art Gallery (32 Hanover St., Manchester). Kids classes, open to ages 10 and up, are held on Thursdays and Fridays, from 4:15 to 5:45 p.m. Adult classes are held on Thursdays, from 6:30 to 8:15 p.m., and Saturdays from 10:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Tuition is pay-as-you-go at $20 per student per class, due upon arrival. Call 493-1677 or visit dianecrespofineart.com for availability.

THEATRE

Shows

THE PRODUCERS A mainstage production of the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester). Now through May 15, with showtimes on Friday at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at noon. Tickets cost $39 to $46. Call 668-5588 or visit palacetheatre.org.

AN INSPECTOR CALLS Presented by New Hampshire Theatre Project. West End Studio Theatre (959 Islington St., Portsmouth). May 6 through May 22, with showtimes on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $30 ($33.26 with fees) for general admission, $26 ($29 with fees) for seniors, students and veterans and must be purchased in advance. Masks are required in the theater. Visit nhtheatreproject.org or call 431-6644.

THE PLAY THAT GOES WRONG Presented by the Manchester Community Theatre Players. Manchester Community Theatre Players Theatre, located at the North End Montessori School (698 Beech St., Manchester). Showtimes on Fri., May 13 and May 20, and Sat., May 14 and May 21, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $20 and must be purchased in advance. Masks and proof of vaccination are required to enter the theater. Visit manchestercommunitytheatre.com or call 327-6777.

CHILDREN OF THE GRIM Presented by Bitter Pill. Players’ Ring Theatre (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth). May 13 through June 5, with showtimes on Fridays at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Tickets cost $28 for adults and $25 for seniors age 65 and up and students. Masks and proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test are required. Visit playersring.org or call 436-8123.

THE BALD SOPRANO Produced by the Community Players of Concord. The Hatbox Theatre (located inside the Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Fri., June 17 through Sun., June 26. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com or call 715-2315 for more information.

TRUE TALES LIVE Portsmouth-based storytelling showcase. Monthly, last Tuesday (no shows in July and August), from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Shows will be held in person (Portsmouth Public Media TV Studio, 280 Marcy St., Portsmouth) starting in April, and returning to the Zoom format for the winter, starting in November. Each month’s showcase is centered around a different theme. The series is free and open to all who want to watch or participate as a storyteller. Pre-registration for attendees is required for Zoom shows but not required for in-person shows. Visit truetaleslivenh.org and email info@truetaleslive.org if you’re interested in being a storyteller.

Comic books for all

Free Comic Book Day returns

After two years of schedule changes, Free Comic Book Day returns to its first Saturday in May spot on the calendar this year with several local shops participating in the May 7 event.

The event, which began in 2002, has handed out millions of copies of special issues of comics created for Free Comic Book Day to people looking to find new stories or rediscover old favorites. Each shop has individual policies regarding how many releases one may take, and which books are available. (This year, there are more than 45 different issues scheduled to be available for Free Comic Book Day, according to freecomicbookday.com, where you can see covers and previews for 2022 comics.)

The day is intended to commemorate each shop and celebrate small businesses and their love for the art of comic books.

Double Midnight Comics, with stores in both Concord and Manchester, is hosting a couple of well-recognized guests to help celebrate this day and intrigue enthusiasts statewide. Its Manchester store will celebrate 20 years in business this July; the Concord store opened eight years ago, relocating from Main Street to Loudon Road this past October.

“[For] our Manchester store, we bill it as a big … extravaganza,” store owner Chris Proulx said. “We had people, pre-Covid, who would line up on Wednesday. There’s people [who] will camp out for a few days ahead of time. … It almost turns into a block party in our parking lot.”

Proulx has high hopes that this FCBD will enter back into the realm of normalcy, as the pandemic forced its cancellation in 2020 and rescheduling to the summer last year. Unfortunately, this led to a much smaller turnout compared to previous years. Proulx said that the Concord location will be for customers looking to simply stop by and look around at their own pace. It is more of an ideal location for younger kids in need of more of a relaxed browsing scene. Proulx looks forward to the release of The Electric Black, which was produced by New Englanders Joseph Schmalke and Rich Woodall, both of whom will appear at the Manchester store that day.

Comics for…
Five comics for kids
• Avatar: The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra
• The Best Archie Comic Ever! (limited-edition issue)
• Disney Masters: Donald Duck & Co. (special-edition issue)
• Pokemon Journeys and Pokemon Adventures XY
• Sonic the Hedgehog
Three comics for Marvel lovers
• The Amazing Spider-Man/Venom (issue No. 1)
• Avengers/X-Men (issue No. 1)
• Marvel’s Voices (issue No. 1)
Three comics with action
• Tex in The Land of the Seminoles
• The Year of the Valiant
• Bloodborne (issue No. 1)

Jetpack Comics & Games in Rochester is another local shop anticipating a substantial turnout for FCBD this year. Store manager Rich Brunelle described the event as a citywide attraction, saying that they look to help promote other small businesses by hiding comics at various locations.

inside of comic book store
Double Midnight Comics in Manchester and Concord. Photos by Jack Walsh.

“We have a ton of businesses around town that are involved in it as well,” Brunelle said. “We basically treat it like a scavenger hunt, where you can go to each one of the businesses, and at each one they give you more free comics.”

Brunelle said those who take part in the scavenger hunt and pick up a comic from each business are eligible for special prizes once the search is complete. In addition to this day-long scavenger hunt, there is a cosplay contest, a mini convention hall at Governor’s Inn, food trucks and more. A couple of guests include legends Steve Lavigne and Jim Lawson, best-known for their work in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comics. Brunelle added that this particular location once held the largest FCBD in the country.

After battling some hardships FCBD is back, and fans statewide should plan on attending fun events with no limitations on any of the festivities planned throughout the day.

Free Comic Book Day

When: Saturday, May 7
Where: Various participating stores statewide
More info: Visit freecomicbookday.com

Participating local stores
See freecomicbookday.com for a look at the 2022 line up of comics.

Chris’s Comics (919 Lafayette Road, Seabrook, 474-2283, chriscardscomics.com) Open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Free Comic Book Day.

Double Midnight Comics (245 Maple St., Manchester, 669-9636; 341 Loudon Road, Concord, 715-2683; dmcomics.com) Open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in Manchester and from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Concord on Free Comic Book Day. The Manchester store will host its annual “Free Comic Book Day Extravaganza,” featuring a tent sale, a costume contest, comic creator signings, door prizes and more.

Escape Hatch Books (27 Main St., Jaffrey, find them on Facebook @escapehatchbooks)

Jetpack Comics & Games (37 N. Main St., Rochester, 330-9636, jetpackcomics.com) Open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Free Comic Book Day. The shop is the nexus of a citywide festival featuring a comic scavenger hunt, a cosplay contest, a mini convention hall at Governor’s Inn, door prizes, food trucks and more.

Merrymac Games and Comics (550 Daniel Webster Hwy., Merrimack, 420-8161, merrymacgc.com) Open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Free Comic Book Day, featuring appearances from a variety of local, independent comic creators.

Stairway to Heaven Comics (105 Gosling Road, Newington, 319-6134, stairwaytoheavencomics.com) Open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Free Comic Book Day, featuring sales on bagged and boarded comics, creator signings and more.

Featured photo: Double Midnight Comics in Manchester and Concord. Photos by Jack Walsh.

The Art Roundup 22/04/28

The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

Wizard spoof: Cue Zero Theatre Co. presents Puffs, or Seven Increasingly Eventful Years at a Certain School of Magic and Magic at Granite State Arts Academy (19 Keewaydin Drive, No. 4, Salem), with showtimes on Friday, April 29, and Sunday, May 1, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, May 1, at 2 p.m. The show is a parody about a certain wizarding school. “It’s a familiar story with a unique twist,” actor Anna Mae told the Hippo earlier this month. “While new stories are always fun, it’s nice to sometimes return to what is familiar and find appreciation for it in new ways. People will recognize many of the major plot points, and I think they’ll really enjoy seeing it from this new perspective.” Tickets cost $15 ($16.25 with online fees). Masks and proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test taken within three days of the performance are required for admittance. The show is also available to livestream for $15. Visit cztheatre.com or email cztheatre@gmail.com.

Dreamcatcher workshop
Head to Canterbury Shaker Village (288 Shaker Road, Canterbury) for a Make Your Own Dreamcatcher workshop on Saturday, April 30, from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Native American artist Lenny Novak will instruct the workshop and discuss the history, meaning, stories and lore of dreamcatchers before teaching participants how to create them in the Ojibway web tradition using natural wood hoops, webbing, beads and feathers. The cost is $25 for Village members and $40 for non-members. Registration is required. All materials will be provided. Call 783-9511 or visit shakers.org.

• ’60s gala: Get your tickets now for the Currier Museum of Art’s (150 Ash St., Manchester) Gala Celebration, happening on Saturday, May 14, from 6 to 10 p.m. The event will include live music, gourmet food, a sponsored cocktail hour, live auction and fundraising program, all inspired by the museum’s current special exhibition, “Warhol Screen Tests.” In the mid-1960s, American multimedia artist Andy Warhol had shot more than 400 short, silent, black-and-white films of his friends at his studio in New York City. He referred to the films, which were unscripted and played in slow motion, as “film portraits” or “stillies.” The exhibition, which is on display now through July 3, features 20 of those films, provided by the Andy Warhol Museum, played in loops across four large-scale projections. Gala attendees must be age 21 or older. Wearing 1960s attire in the spirit of the exhibition is welcome. Tickets cost $350 per person. A limited number of tickets is available for admittance to both the gala and an exclusive pre-gala reception at the Chandler House; those cost $500 per person. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

Iron Melt
There’s still time to register for the Andres Institute of Art’s Remote Spring Iron Melt; registration is open now through Saturday, April 30. Traditionally, the public created custom designed iron tiles onsite. For the remote event, participants pick up a mold from the Institute (106 Brookline Road, Hollis) — pickup dates are Thursday, April 28, and Saturday, April 30, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Drop-off dates are the same as pickup dates, plus Thursday, May 5. Designs will be poured at Green Foundry in Maine on Saturday, May 7, and available for pickup on Thursday, May 12, and Saturday, May 14. The cost is $40 per mold, or $30 for AIA members. Visit andresinstitute.org or call 673-7441.

Ceramics by hand: The League of NH Craftsmen Meredith Fine Craft Gallery (279 Daniel Webster Hwy., Meredith) will host a two-part ceramic hand-building class on Saturday, April 30, from 10 a.m. to noon, and continuing on Sunday, May 14, from 10 a.m. to noon, at Xavier Ceramics studio in Center Harbor. At the first session, participants will hand-build a planter, vase or container, which the instructor and studio owner Ann Xavier will fire in her kiln. Then, at the second session, participants will glaze their pieces, which will be fired again and ready to take home. The cost is $70, plus a $35 materials fee paid to the instructor on the day of the first session. Space is limited, and registration is required. Call 279-7920 or visit meredith.nhcrafts.org/classes.

Surreal paintings
A special exhibition featuring the work of Arghavan Khosravi is on view at the Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). The artist’s surrealist paintings explore themes such as exile, freedom and empowerment, and allude to human rights issues, particularly those affecting women and immigrants. They’ll remain on display through Monday, Sept. 5. Admission is $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17, and is free for children age 12 and under and for members. Hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

Fiddles for a cause: The New Hampshire Fiddle Ensemble will perform at the Exeter Town Hall (9 Front St., Exeter) on Saturday, April 30, at 7 p.m. to benefit the New Hampshire Children’s Trust. The group consists of more than 100 musicians between the ages of 9 and 89, playing fiddles, guitars, banjos, mandolins, basses, harps, cellos and horns, and singing. Tickets cost $16 for adults, $14 for seniors and students and $12 for children ages 13 and under. Masks or proof of vaccination are required for admittance. Visit nhfiddleensemble.org.


ART

Exhibits

• “IMPACT! ABSTRACT! Exhibition featuring the abstract work of six local artists, including Ann Saunderson, who works in acrylic, mixed media, oil and cold wax and monotype; Daniela Wenzel, who does oil painting, assemblage, ink drawing, driftwood pyrography and improvised quilt-making; Kate Higley, who does printmaking; Ethel Hills, who works in acrylic; and Grace Mattern, who does mixed media collage. Twiggs Gallery (254 King St., Boscawen). On view now through May 28. Gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com or call 975-0015.

• “APPEAL OF THE REAL: 19TH CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD” exhibition features photographs taken throughout the Mediterranean to record the ruins of ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through June 12. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “WARHOL SCREEN TESTS” In the mid-1960s, American multimedia artist Andy Warhol had shot more than 400 short, silent, black-and-white films of his friends at his studio in New York City. Warhol referred to the films, which were unscripted and played in slow motion, as “film portraits” or “stillies.” The exhibition will feature 20 of those films, provided by the Andy Warhol Museum, in loops across four large-scale projections. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through July 3. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “ARGHAVAN KHOSRAVI” Artist’s surrealist paintings explore themes of exile, freedom and empowerment; center female protagonists; and allude to human rights issues, particularly those affecting women and immigrants. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through Sept. 5. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “ECHOES: ABSTRACT PAINTING TO MODERN QUILTING” exhibition features abstract paintings inspired by the bold colors, asymmetry, improvisational layout, alternate grid work and negative space in composition of modern quilting. Two Villages Art Society (46 Main St., Contoocook). On display now through May 14. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372 for more information.

NATURE AT NIGHT: PAINTINGS BY OWEN KRZYZANIAK GEARY” Two Villages Art Society (46 Main St., Contoocook). On display from May 27 through June 18. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372 for more information.

ART ON MAIN The City of Concord and the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce present a year-round outdoor public art exhibition in Concord’s downtown featuring works by professional sculptors. All sculptures will be for sale. Visit concordnhchamber.com/creativeconcord, call 224-2508 or email tsink@concordnhchamber.com for more information.

Call for Submissions

SCULPTURE SUBMISSIONS The City of Concord and the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce’s Creative Concord Committee are seeking sculptors for the city’s fifth annual “Art on Main” Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition, a year-round outdoor public art exhibit set up in Concord’s downtown. Professional sculptors age 18 and older (with preference for New England-based sculptors) are invited to submit up to two original sculptures for consideration. The selected sculptors will receive a $500 stipend, and their sculptures will be on display and for sale from June 2022 through May 2023 (30 percent commission taken by City of Concord). The deadline for entries is Friday, April 29. To apply, visit concordnhchamber.com/creativeconcord, call 224-2508 or email tsink@concordnhchamber.com.

Fairs and markets

CRAFTSMEN’S FAIR The annual nine-day outdoor craft fair hosted by the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen features hundreds of craftspeople with vendor booths, plus special craft exhibitions, demonstrations, hands-on workshops and more. Sat., Aug. 6 through Sun., Aug. 14. Mount Sunapee Resort, 1398 Route 103, Newbury. Call 224-3375 or visit nhcrafts.org for more information.

CONCORD ARTS MARKET The juried outdoor artisan and fine art market runs one Saturday a month, June through October, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Market dates are June 11, July 30, Aug. 20, Sept. 17 and Oct. 15. Rollins Park, 33 Bow St., Concord. concordartsmarket.net. The first market will be held on Saturday, June 11. Visit concordartsmarket.net/summer-arts-market.html for more information.

Special events

REMOTE SPRING IRON MELT Participants may pick up a mold from the Institute, scratch their design at home, then drop off their scratched molds back at the Institute. Andres Institute of Art, 106 Brookline Road, Hollis. Pickup dates are Thurs., April 28, and Sat., April 30, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Drop-off dates are the same as pickup dates, plus Thurs., May 5. Online registration is required and is open now through Sat., April 30. Designs will be poured at Green Foundry in Maine on Saturday, May 7, and available for final pickup on Thursday, May 12, and Saturday, May 14. The cost is $40 per mold, or $30 for AIA members. Visit andresinstitute.org or call 673-7441.

SPRING OPEN STUDIOS Art Up Front Street Studios & Gallery, 120 Front St., Exeter. The artists’ collective features seven working artist studios. Sat., May 7, and Sun., May 8, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 418-6286 or visit artupfrontstreet.com for more information.

CURRIER MUSEUM OF ART GALA CELEBRATION Event will include live music, gourmet food, a sponsored cocktail hour, live auction and fundraising program, all inspired by the museum’s current special exhibition, “Warhol Screen Tests.” Currier Museum of Art’s (150 Ash St., Manchester). Sat., May 14, from 6 to 10 p.m. Gala attendees must be age 21 or older. Wearing 1960s attire in the spirit of the exhibition is welcome. Tickets cost $350 per person. A limited number of tickets is available for admittance to both the gala and an exclusive pre-gala reception at the Chandler House; those cost $500 per person. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

Workshops and classes

• “BLACKSMITHING BASICS” Beginner level workshop. Sanborn Mills Farm(7097 Sanborn Road, Loudon). Fri., May 20, through Sun., May 22, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. The cost is $375. Call 435-7314 or visit sanbornmills.org for more information.

• “INTRO TO 3D PRINTING” Port City Makerspace (68 Morning St., Portsmouth). Wed., June 8, from 6 to 9 p.m. The cost is $25 for members of the makerspace and $45 for nonmembers. Call 373-1002 or visit portcitymakerspace.com for more information.

ART CLASSES Art classes for teens and adults, including Pottery, Stained Glass, Intermediate Watercolor and Clay Hand Building. Studio 550 Art Center (550 Elm St., Manchester). Five-week sessions. Classes met for two hours a week. Call 232-5597 or visit 550arts.com for the full schedule and cost details.

DRAWING & PAINTING CLASSES Art House Studios, 66 Hanover St., Suite 202, Manchester. Classes include Drawing Fundamentals, Painting in Acrylic, Drawing: Observation to Abstraction, Exploring Mixed Media, and Figure Drawing. Class sizes are limited to six students. Visit arthousestudios.org or email arthousejb@gmail.comfor more information.

GENERAL ART CLASSES Weekly art classes offered for both kids and adults of all skill levels and cover a variety of two-dimensional media, including drawing and painting with pastel, acrylic, watercolor and oils. Classes are held with small groups of three to eight to five students. Diane Crespo Fine Art Gallery (32 Hanover St., Manchester). Kids classes, open to ages 10 and up, are held on Thursdays and Fridays, from 4:15 to 5:45 p.m. Adult classes are held on Thursdays, from 6:30 to 8:15 p.m., and Saturdays from 10:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Tuition is pay-as-you-go at $20 per student per class, due upon arrival. Call 493-1677 or visit dianecrespofineart.com for availability.

THEATRE

Classes/workshops

STORYTELLING WORKSHOPS Monthly workshop series hosted by True Tales Live storytelling showcase. First Tuesday (except November), from 7 to 8:30 p.m., virtual, via Zoom. Registration is required. Visit truetaleslivenh.org for more information.

Shows

THE PRODUCERS A mainstage production of the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester). Now through May 15, with showtimes on Friday at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at noon. Tickets cost $39 to $46. Call 668-5588 or visit palacetheatre.org.

PUFFS! OR SEVEN INCREASINGLY EVENTFUL YEARS AT A CERTAIN SCHOOL OF MAGIC AND MAGIC Cue Zero Theatre Co. presents. Granite State Arts Academy (19 Keewaydin Drive, No. 4, Salem). Showtimes on Fri., April 29, and Sun., May 1, at 7:30 p.m., and Sun., May 1, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $15 ($16.25 with fees). Masks and proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test taken within three days of the performance are required. The show is also available to livestream for $15. Visit cztheatre.com or email cztheatre@gmail.com for more information.

LAST GAS Produced by the Community Players of Concord. Concord City Auditorium, 2 Prince St., Concord. Fri., May 6, through Sun., May 8. Tickets cost $18 for adults, $16 for youth ages 17 and under, $16 for seniors age 65 and up. Visit communityplayersofconcord.org or call 224-4905 for more information.

AN INSPECTOR CALLS Presented by New Hampshire Theatre Project. West End Studio Theatre (959 Islington St., Portsmouth). May 6 through May 22, with showtimes on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $30 ($33.26 with fees) for general admission, $26 ($29 with fees) for seniors, students and veterans and must be purchased in advance. Masks are required in the theater. Visit nhtheatreproject.org or call 431-6644.

THE PLAY THAT GOES WRONG Presented by the Manchester Community Theatre Players. Manchester Community Theatre Players Theatre, located at the North End Montessori School (698 Beech St., Manchester). Showtimes on Fri., May 13 and May 20, and Sat., May 14 and May 21, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $20 and must be purchased in advance. Masks and proof of vaccination are required to enter the theater. Visit manchestercommunitytheatre.com or call 327-6777.

CHILDREN OF THE GRIM Presented by Bitter Pill. Players’ Ring Theatre (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth). May 13 through June 5, with showtimes on Fridays at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Tickets cost $28 for adults and $25 for seniors age 65 and up and students. Masks and proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test are required. Visit playersring.org or call 436-8123.

THE BALD SOPRANO Produced by the Community Players of Concord. The Hatbox Theatre (located inside the Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Fri., June 17 through Sun., June 26. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com or call 715-2315 for more information.

TRUE TALES LIVE Portsmouth-based storytelling showcase. Monthly, last Tuesday (no shows in July and August), from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Shows will be held in person (Portsmouth Public Media TV Studio, 280 Marcy St., Portsmouth) starting in April, and returning to the Zoom format for the winter, starting in November. Each month’s showcase is centered around a different theme. The series is free and open to all who want to watch or participate as a storyteller. Pre-registration for attendees is required for Zoom shows but not required for in-person shows. Visit truetaleslivenh.org and email info@truetaleslive.org if you’re interested in being a storyteller.

Classical

• “THE MUSIC OF JAMES BOND” Symphony New Hampshire presents. The performance will include Themes from 007, a Medley for Orchestra and themes from other spy film favorites, including Mission Impossible, Pink Panther and Raiders of the Lost Ark. Sat., May 7, from 7:30 to 8:50 p.m. Keefe Center for the Arts (117 Elm St., Nashua). Tickets cost $20 to $60 for adults, $18 to $55 for seniors age 65 and up, and free for children with a paying adult. Visit symphonynh.org or call 595-9156 for more information.

SPRING POPS BROADWAY AND MORE The New Hampshire Philharmonic Orchestra performs. Seifert Performing Arts Center, 44 Geremonty Drive, Salem. Sat., May 21, at 7:30 p.m., and Sun., May 22, at 2 p.m. Visit nhphil.org or call 647-6476 for more information.

The Art Roundup 22/04/21

The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

Molten fun: Online registration for the Andres Institute of Art’s Remote Spring Iron Melt is open now through Saturday, April 30. Traditionally, the public has been invited to the Institute’s studio space to create custom designed iron tiles; participants would scratch their design into a 6-by-6-inch sand mold and coat it with a liquid graphite, then watch as molten iron is poured into their molds on site. For the remote event, participants will pick up a mold from the Institute (106 Brookline Road, Hollis) — pickup dates are Thursdays, April 21 and April 28, and Saturdays, April 23 and April 30, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. — and scratch their design at home, then drop off their scratched molds back at the Institute; drop-off dates are the same as pickup dates, plus Thursday, May 5. Designs will be poured at Green Foundry in Maine on Saturday, May 7, and available for pickup on Thursday, May 12, and Saturday, May 14. The cost is $40 per mold, or $30 for AIA members. Visit andresinstitute.org or call 673-7441.

Make way for … Ja’far?: Twisted: The Untold Story of a Royal Vizier, produced by the Actors Cooperative Theatre, will begin a three-weekend run at the Hatbox Theatre (270 Loudon Road in Concord; hatboxnh.com, 715-2315) on Friday, April 22. The show will run through Sunday, May 8, with shows on Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m and Sundays at 2 p.m Tickets cost $22 for adults ($19 for seniors and students). The play is described as a comic rif on the 1990s Aladdin story told from the perspective of Ja’far “a well-intentioned and hardworking official from The Kingdom,” according to a press release (which notes that the play contains “adult language, adult situations … drug references, sexual situations and partial nudity”). The musical is written by some of the same people behind parodies like A Very Potter Musical and The Trail to Oregon, the release said.

Sculptors wanted
The City of Concord and the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce’s Creative Concord Committee are seeking sculptors for the city’s fifth annual “Art on Main” Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition, a year-round outdoor public art exhibit set up in Concord’s downtown. Professional sculptors age 18 and older (with preference for New England-based sculptors) are invited to submit up to two original sculptures for consideration. The selected sculptors will receive a $500 stipend, and their sculptures will be on display and for sale from June 2022 through May 2023 (30 percent commission taken by City of Concord). The deadline for entries is Friday, April 29. To apply, visit concordnhchamber.com/creativeconcord, call 224-2508 or email tsink@concordnhchamber.com.

Abstract art shown: Twiggs Gallery (254 King St., Boscawen) presents a new exhibit, “Impact! Abstract!,” featuring the work of six local artists, on view now through May 28. The artists include Ann Saunderson, who works in acrylic, mixed media, oil and cold wax and monotype; Daniela Wenzel, who does oil painting, assemblage, ink drawing, driftwood pyrography and improvised quilt-making; Kate Higley, who does printmaking; Ethel Hills, who works in acrylic; and Grace Mattern, who does mixed media collage. “It showcases artists boldly approaching abstraction in completely different ways with a wide variety of media,” Twiggs gallery director Laura Morrison told the Hippo earlier this month. “Most of the artwork in this exhibit is on the smaller side, yet each piece really stands out on its own. It’s very powerful work.” Gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com or call 975-0015.

Once trash, now fashion: The Upcycled Fashion Show, presented by Makers Mill and the Governor Wentworth Arts Council, will be held on Saturday, April 23, from 7 to 9 p.m. at Makers Mill (23 Bay St., Wolfeboro). The event invites designers of all ages to create wearable art with at least 75 percent of the materials being recycled, reused or repurposed. “Upcycled fashion is … a great way to experiment artistically and … experiment with style,” featured designer Amelia Bickford told the Hippo last month, adding that the show is “a great opportunity to draw further attention to the tremendous need the world has for recycling and reducing waste.” Tickets for spectators cost $5 in advance and $7 at the door. Visit makersmill.org/blog or call 569-1500.

Music of love: Symphony New Hampshire presents a concert, “Love’s Dawn,” on Saturday, April 23, from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Keefe Center for the Arts (117 Elm St., Nashua). The program will feature Claude Debussy’s Petite Suite, Richard Wagner’s Siegfried Idyll and Wolfgang Mozart’s Symphony No. 35 in D major, K.385 “Haffner.” Doors open at 6:15 p.m., and there will be a pre-concert talk at 6:30 p.m. and a post-concert reflection approximately 15 minutes after the concert. Masks and proof of vaccination are required for all attendees. Ticket costs range from $20 to $60 for adults, and from $18 to $55 for seniors age 65 and up. Children are admitted for free with paying adults. Visit symphonynh.org or call 595-9156.

Wild Symphony
New Hampshire native and bestselling author of The Da Vinci Code Dan Brown will join the University of New Hampshire Wind Symphony for the world premiere of the wind ensemble version of his debut classical work Wild Symphony on Sunday, April 24, from 5 to 6:30 p.m., at the university’s Johnson Theatre (30 Academic Way, Durham). The work is based on the musical album, released in conjunction with a corresponding children’s book of the same name, which pairs short poems and illustrations of animals with classical music. Brown will narrate the book while the symphony performs the music. The event is free, but tickets must be reserved in advance. Visit unh.universitytickets.com.


ART

Exhibits

• “IMPACT! ABSTRACT! Exhibition featuring the abstract work of six local artists, including Ann Saunderson, who works in acrylic, mixed media, oil and cold wax and monotype; Daniela Wenzel, who does oil painting, assemblage, ink drawing, driftwood pyrography and improvised quilt-making; Kate Higley, who does printmaking; Ethel Hills, who works in acrylic; and Grace Mattern, who does mixed media collage. Twiggs Gallery (254 King St., Boscawen). On view now through May 28. Gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com or call 975-0015.

• “APPEAL OF THE REAL: 19TH CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD” exhibition features photographs taken throughout the Mediterranean to record the ruins of ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through June 12. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “WARHOL SCREEN TESTS” In the mid-1960s, American multimedia artist Andy Warhol had shot more than 400 short, silent, black-and-white films of his friends at his studio in New York City. Warhol referred to the films, which were unscripted and played in slow motion, as “film portraits” or “stillies.” The exhibition will feature 20 of those films, provided by the Andy Warhol Museum, in loops across four large-scale projections. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through July 3. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “ARGHAVAN KHOSRAVI” Artist’s surrealist paintings explore themes of exile, freedom and empowerment; center female protagonists; and allude to human rights issues, particularly those affecting women and immigrants. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through Sept. 5. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “ECHOES: ABSTRACT PAINTING TO MODERN QUILTING” exhibition features abstract paintings inspired by the bold colors, asymmetry, improvisational layout, alternate grid work and negative space in composition of modern quilting. Two Villages Art Society (46 Main St., Contoocook). On display from April 22 through May 14. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372 for more information.

NATURE AT NIGHT: PAINTINGS BY OWEN KRZYZANIAK GEARY” Two Villages Art Society (46 Main St., Contoocook). On display from May 27 through June 18. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372 for more information.

ART ON MAIN The City of Concord and the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce present a year-round outdoor public art exhibition in Concord’s downtown featuring works by professional sculptors. All sculptures will be for sale. Visit concordnhchamber.com/creativeconcord, call 224-2508 or email tsink@concordnhchamber.com for more information.

Calls for submissions

SCULPTURE SUBMISSIONS The City of Concord and the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce’s Creative Concord Committee are seeking sculptors for the city’s fifth annual “Art on Main” Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition, a year-round outdoor public art exhibit set up in Concord’s downtown. Professional sculptors age 18 and older (with preference for New England-based sculptors) are invited to submit up to two original sculptures for consideration. The selected sculptors will receive a $500 stipend, and their sculptures will be on display and for sale from June 2022 through May 2023 (30 percent commission taken by City of Concord). The deadline for entries is Friday, April 29. To apply, visit concordnhchamber.com/creativeconcord, call 224-2508 or email tsink@concordnhchamber.com.

Fairs and markets

CRAFTSMEN’S FAIR The annual nine-day outdoor craft fair hosted by the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen features hundreds of craftspeople with vendor booths, plus special craft exhibitions, demonstrations, hands-on workshops and more. Sat., Aug. 6 through Sun., Aug. 14. Mount Sunapee Resort, 1398 Route 103, Newbury. Call 224-3375 or visit nhcrafts.org for more information.

CONCORD ARTS MARKET The juried outdoor artisan and fine art market runs one Saturday a month, June through October, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Market dates are June 11, July 30, Aug. 20, Sept. 17 and Oct. 15. Rollins Park, 33 Bow St., Concord. concordartsmarket.net. The first market will be held on Saturday, June 11. Visit concordartsmarket.net/summer-arts-market.html for more information.

Special events

REMOTE SPRING IRON MELT Participants may pick up a mold from the Institute, scratch their design at home, then drop off their scratched molds back at the Institute. Andres Institute of Art, 106 Brookline Road, Hollis. Pickup dates are Thurs., April 21 and April 28, and Sat., April 23 and April 30, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Drop-off dates are the same as pickup dates, plus Thurs., May 5. Online registration is required and is open now through Sat., April 30. Designs will be poured at Green Foundry in Maine on Saturday, May 7, and available for final pickup on Thursday, May 12, and Saturday, May 14. The cost is $40 per mold, or $30 for AIA members. Visit andresinstitute.org or call 673-7441.

UPCYCLED FASHION SHOW Presented by Makers Mill and the Governor Wentworth Arts Council. Designers of all ages are invited to create fashion pieces composed of at least 75 percent recycled, reused or repurposed materials. Sat., April 23, from 7 to 9 p.m. Makers Mill (23 Bay St., Wolfeboro). Registration for designers is free and open now through the end of March or until participation is full. Visit makersmill.org/blog or call 569-1500 for more information.

SPRING OPEN STUDIOS Art Up Front Street Studios & Gallery, 120 Front St., Exeter. The artists’ collective features seven working artist studios. Sat., May 7, and Sun., May 8, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 418-6286 or visit artupfrontstreet.com for more information.

Workshops and classes

• “BLACKSMITHING BASICS” Beginner level workshop. Sanborn Mills Farm(7097 Sanborn Road, Loudon). Fri., May 20, through Sun., May 22, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. The cost is $375. Call 435-7314 or visit sanbornmills.org for more information.

• “INTRO TO 3D PRINTING” Port City Makerspace (68 Morning St., Portsmouth). Wed., June 8, from 6 to 9 p.m. The cost is $25 for members of the makerspace and $45 for nonmembers. Call 373-1002 or visit portcitymakerspace.com for more information.

ART CLASSES Art classes for teens and adults, including Pottery, Stained Glass, Intermediate Watercolor and Clay Hand Building. Studio 550 Art Center (550 Elm St., Manchester). Five-week sessions. Classes met for two hours a week. Call 232-5597 or visit 550arts.com for the full schedule and cost details.

DRAWING & PAINTING CLASSES Art House Studios, 66 Hanover St., Suite 202, Manchester. Classes include Drawing Fundamentals, Painting in Acrylic, Drawing: Observation to Abstraction, Exploring Mixed Media, and Figure Drawing. Class sizes are limited to six students. Visit arthousestudios.org or email arthousejb@gmail.comfor more information.

GENERAL ART CLASSES Weekly art classes offered for both kids and adults of all skill levels and cover a variety of two-dimensional media, including drawing and painting with pastel, acrylic, watercolor and oils. Classes are held with small groups of three to eight to five students. Diane Crespo Fine Art Gallery (32 Hanover St., Manchester). Kids classes, open to ages 10 and up, are held on Thursdays and Fridays, from 4:15 to 5:45 p.m. Adult classes are held on Thursdays, from 6:30 to 8:15 p.m., and Saturdays from 10:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Tuition is pay-as-you-go at $20 per student per class, due upon arrival. Call 493-1677 or visit dianecrespofineart.com for availability.

THEATRE

Classes/workshops

STORYTELLING WORKSHOPS Monthly workshop series hosted by True Tales Live storytelling showcase. First Tuesday (except November), from 7 to 8:30 p.m., virtual, via Zoom. Registration is required. Visit truetaleslivenh.org for more information.

Shows

THE PRODUCERS A mainstage production of the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester). April 22 through May 15, with showtimes on Friday at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at noon. Tickets cost $39 to $46. Call 668-5588 or visit palacetheatre.org.

•​ THE RULE OF THREEAn adaptation of Agatha Christie’s one-act murder mystery series, presented by the Majestic Studio Theatre (880 Page St., Manchester). Showtimes are on Friday, April 22, and Saturday, April 23, at 7 p.m., and Sunday, April 24, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $15 to $20. Call 669-7469 or visit majestictheatre.net.

Illustrations on auction

Bedford artist donates old works to support FIT

When Tracey Dahle Carrier of Bedford created her first illustrations for a kids’ booklet for Bedford Presbyterian Church, it never occurred to her that two decades later those illustrations would be back at the church for a whole different purpose — raising money for Families in Transition via an art auction.

The auction is being held online and in person now through April 30, featuring nearly 50 of Carrier’s original illustrations and artist proofs from her children’s books — she’s illustrated five, including Digby in Disguise.

But the project that started it all was the small booklet she created for the church at the request of her friend and co-author, Ruth Boling.

Illustration of cat in autumn woods
Copyright and courtesy of Tracey Dahle Carrier.

“The Bedford Presbyterian Church was merging their church service to include children [and the church wanted to create] a booklet to help kids understand the service and what to expect,” said Carrier, who at the time was working from home doing freelance work, illustrating for different companies. “I ended up donating the illustrations and the design.”

Carrier said she wanted to make the booklet attractive to kids, and relatable.

“Kids are squirmy and they’re wiggling around in their seats and making noises,” she said. “I wanted to take the child’s perspective into account.”

So she created characters that have similar qualities: mice.

“Mice are seldom welcome and are squirmy and hard to manage,” Carrier said. “They were the perfect spokespeople for this job.”

The booklet was picked up by Geneva Press, and after it was published, John Knox Press asked for more, similar children’s books from Carrier and Boling.

“It was quite a successful little venture,” Carrier said.

The pair decided that when the first JKP book was released, all proceeds would go to Families in Transition, an organization that the church as well as Carrier and her husband support.

illustration of mice in mouse church
Copyright and courtesy of Tracey Dahle Carrier.

Fast forward 20 years to when Covid hit. Carrier — who is the membership manager at the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester — started working from home.

“We had to work extra hard to stay connected to the art-loving community,” she said.

During her lunch breaks, she and her husband would talk about how there were so many in the community who were devastated by Covid, some even unable to pay their rent.

“When I was thinking about what to do [to help], it was hard to know because I couldn’t really get out and about,” she said.

But then she thought back to the donations that she and Boling had made to Families in Transition so many years ago and figured it wouldn’t hurt to approach the church to see if there was a way to help FIT with support from Bedford Presbyterian.

“There are people who might still have some feelings for these mice,” Carrier thought.

The church agreed and suggested they include some of Carrier’s other pieces that she’s illustrated over the years. There’s a poster that she created for the NH Reading Program when its theme was “treasure reading,” so it features mice scrambling off a pirate ship to find books. There are also pieces from Digby in Disguise and Digby Finds a Friend; those books feature a little bear.

There are other animal illustrations too: “There’s a lot of fur in these drawings,” she laughed.

One is a drawing of a black lab, and as with all of her animals, Carrier said she tried to capture its personality and spirit.

“I had a Bernese mountain dog for 12 years, and I was asked by Silent Moon Press to illustrate a book about Bernese mountain dogs,” Carrier said. “I knew [my dog] wasn’t going to be around much longer, so it was a tribute to her.”

Carrier stopped illustrating in 2012, as she was juggling work at the Currier — part-time, at that point — and doing commissioned work for McGowan Fine Arts Gallery in Concord, and teaching at the New Hampshire Institute of Art. When the Currier offered her a full-time position, she took it, and she has been there ever since. She’s thinking about retiring soon, though, and might go back to doing some artwork.

For now, the best chance to see Carrier’s work is at the church or online. One hundred percent of the proceeds of the auction will go to Families in Transition.

“If anyone wants to take a look at the art and see if there’s anything that appeals to them … or if they don’t have a lot of wall space and just want to make a donation, that would be great,” Carrier said.

Art Auction
Bidding for Tracey Dahle Carrier’s artwork runs through April 30. All items are on display and can be viewed in person at Bedford Presbyterian Church (4 Church Road in Bedford) during regular office hours Monday through Friday, or find the auction link online at bedfordpresbyterian.org. Call ahead at 472-5841 to arrange viewing times. There is a “Buy Now” option for all pieces to bypass the bidding process, and 100 percent of proceeds will benefit Families in Transition.

Featured photo: Copyright and courtesy of Tracey Dahle Carrier. Courtesy photo.

The Art Roundup 22/04/14

The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

Artistic exploration of the White Mountains: Writer Howard Mansfield and composer Ben Cosgrove present “A Journey to the White Mountains in Words and Music” at the Bank of NH Stage (16 S. Main St., Concord) on Thursday, April 14, at 7:30 p.m. The show, which is based on a chapter from Mansfield’s recent book Chasing Eden: A Book of Seekers and on Cosgrove’s landscape-inspired music, explores the impact that the discovery of the White Mountains has today. “Pioneering artists in the 19th century taught Americans how to look at the wilderness,” Mansfield said in a press release. “Americans were eager for the lesson and … followed the artists. Their art created a market for the views, filled hotels with tourists, and laid the bounds for national parks across the country.” Tickets cost $24. Visit ccanh.com.

Diverse female authors panel: The New Hampshire Writers’ Project will present a virtual panel discussion, “Speaking Of: Women of Color,” on Saturday, April 16, from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Six female authors of diverse origin and culture will discuss their work and how their backgrounds led them to start writing as a form of self-expression and education. The authors include Brinda Charry, an immigrant from India to the U.S., fiction writer and specialist in British literature with a focus on English Renaissance literature and Shakespeare; Christine Nih’shaw Almstrom, children’s book author of Blackfeet/Onondaga Iroquois descent; Gledè Browne Kabongo, an author of psychological thrillers, originally from Dominica in the Eastern Caribbean; Hanh Bui, a children’s book author who came to the U.S. with her family at age 8 as a refugee escaping war-torn Vietnam; Loretta LC Brady, an author and a licensed clinical psychologist, professor of psychology and the director of the Community Resilience and Social Equity Lab at Saint Anselm College; and Masheri Chappelle, a playwright, novelist and intuitive consultant of African American and Native American descent. Rosa Marie Bell, Afro-Panamanian educator, multicultural moderator and executive producer of a weekly broadcast “Cafecito Cultural,” will moderate the panel. The event will take place over Zoom and is free for New Hampshire Writers’ Project members and $20 for non-members. Visit nhwritersproject.org to register.

Ancient photography: The Currier Museum of Art(150 Ash St., Manchester) has an exhibition, “Appeal of the Real: 19th Century Photographs of the Ancient World,” on view now through June 12. It features photographs of the ruins of ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome, taken prior to when tourists could take their own photographs, often at the request of wealthy European and American tourists. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17, and is free for children under age 13 and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

Opportunity for teen writers: Under the Madness, a new New Hampshire-based teen creative writing magazine, is accepting submissions now through Friday, April 15, for its second issue. The magazine is designed and managed by an editorial board of New Hampshire teens under the mentorship of New Hampshire State Poet Laureate Alexandria Peary. It features creative writing by teens ages 13 to 19 from all over the world, including poetry and short fiction and creative nonfiction. “It speaks to the confusing whirlwind faced by teenagers [due to the] pandemic, political polarization, global warming, inequity and unrest,” Peary told the Hippo earlier this year, “[and to] writing and creative expression as a way to set a foot on the ground when the adult-made sky seems to be spinning.” Submissions are open for future issues on an ongoing basis. All writing must be written in or translated into English and must be previously unpublished. Visit underthemadnessmagazine.com for full submission guidelines and to read the first issue.


ART

Exhibits

• “STITCHED TOGETHER – ELEMENTS OF NATURE FROM TEXTILE FRAGMENTS” New Hampshire Art Association exhibition features the textile collages of Cheryl Miller, inspired by the colors in nature. On display now through April 15. Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce Visitors Center. Regular gallery hours are Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. All work is for sale. Visit nhartassociation.org or call 431-4230 for more information.

• “APPEAL OF THE REAL: 19TH CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD” exhibition features photographs taken throughout the Mediterranean to record the ruins of ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through June 12. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “WARHOL SCREEN TESTS” In the mid-1960s, American multimedia artist Andy Warhol had shot more than 400 short, silent, black-and-white films of his friends at his studio in New York City. Warhol referred to the films, which were unscripted and played in slow motion, as “film portraits” or “stillies.” The exhibition will feature 20 of those films, provided by the Andy Warhol Museum, in loops across four large-scale projections. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display from March 31 through July 3. Admission is $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 to 17 and free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

Bold and beautiful

Powerful works on display at ‘Impact! Abstract’ exhibition

Twiggs Gallery in Boscawen has opened its 2022 season with “Impact! Abstract!” featuring the work of six local artists and on display through May 28.

“It showcases artists boldly approaching abstraction in completely different ways with a wide variety of media,” Twiggs Gallery Director Laura Morrison said. “Most of the artwork in this exhibit is on the smaller side, yet each piece really stands out on its own. It’s very powerful work.”

Each of the six artists answered a few questions via email about their inspiration and techniques.

Ann Saunderson

Acrylic, mixed media, oil & cold wax, monotype

What draws you to abstract art?

At first abstraction was just a challenge after having been a landscape and narrative painter all my life.

What was your artistic process in creating pieces for this exhibition?

It was surprisingly difficult to switch over and loosen up enough to enjoy the process. Once I accepted that I could paint over layers it was easier. And oil and cold wax helped and added the possibility of texture. Most of my work is really quite accidental. I may start with a theme, a concept, and then halfway through there’s a moment where the paint and I change directions and truly I’m just along for the ride.

How does your work in this exhibition make an impact?

My work is pretty dynamic. It doesn’t have answers and leaves a great deal up to the viewer. I love color and texture and I think those factors also give my paintings impact.

Daniela Wenzel

Oil painting, assemblage, ink drawing, driftwood pyrography and improvised quilt making

What draws you to abstract art?

What excites me about abstraction are the endless possibilities to depict facets of everyday life and the environment, without portraying clearly recognizable subject matter. An abstract work of art can mean many things to different viewers. I am specifically drawn to the emotional capacity in abstract art and its utter unpredictability. I rarely have a definite vision in mind when I start a new piece.

A low relief abstract sculptures by Daniela Wenzel.

What inspired your choice of materials?

I enjoy free experimentation with color and techniques, pushing boundaries and being resourceful with my materials.

What was your artistic process in creating pieces for this exhibition?

While time stood still at the height of Covid-19 in the spring of 2020, I found myself home with my kids on the days I wasn’t working at Elliot Hospital. My three Lego assemblages were created due to lack of time to paint in the studio. A lover of any kind of colorful visual vocabulary, I improvised my art making and created simple color abstractions. I specifically enjoyed playing with color theory and depth by layering different shapes and hues. Legos are an incredibly fun and abundant art supply and after repeatedly stepping on them I realized they could be more than nagging booby traps. For the two oil paintings included in the ‘Impact! Abstract’ exhibition I also used pigment sticks, which are basically solidified oil paint in the shape of a thumb-sized crayon. The use of these is more immediate and less deliberate and the marks noticeably different than from a paint brush.

How does your work in this exhibition make an impact?

The paintings both reflect and resonate the same playfulness and positivity as the Lego assemblages. They contain colorful pattern work, evocative shapes and a variety of paint application techniques to carry a sense of spontaneity.

Kate Higley

Printmaking

What draws you to abstract art?

I was a painting major as an undergrad, discovered printmaking in my early 30s, and fell in love with the way it has to be done step by step. The focus on process slows me down in a good way.

Printmaker Kate Higley’s “Spinning World.”

What inspired your choice of materials?

These particular prints are intaglio drypoints. This means that the ink is snagged inside the lines rather than flowing across the surface. I use an expanded plastic material for the plate and all kinds of sharp objects to make an image. It is then inked, wiped, and put through a press onto dampened paper.

What was your artistic process in creating pieces for this exhibition?

The gallery inquired if I could submit some black and white images. With three older plates on hand, I printed those, became engrossed and created four more plates specifically for this exhibit. The incentive was the invitation and I think Laura Morrison, the curator, used the absence of color to break up the other more vibrant work in a lovely installation.

How does your work in this exhibition make an impact?

My interest is inventing small organisms swimming or tangled in imagined aquatic or marine environments. The concerns are ecological and environmental. As an abstract artist, my aims are quite different from those who work toward realism. Texture, movement and repetition are all used to create a mysterious and engaging space where the viewer can consider not just what is present, but what might be happening outside the picture place.

Ethel Hills

Acrylic

What draws you to abstract art?

I started in abstract art almost accidentally. I was working in watercolor and started using a wet in wet technique to drop unusual colors into my landscapes. That led me to being more experimental and more colorful, letting go of realism in favor of design and color. The bottom line is that I’d much rather have a luscious crazy colorful painting than one that looks like a photograph.

Ethel Hills – Signs of Spring – Acrylic on Panel – 8″ x 8″

What was your artistic process in creating pieces for this exhibition?

The pieces in this exhibit were painted with lots of play and experimentation. I put shapes and marks on the panel or canvas and then keep playing and experimenting, looking for surprises, and looking for what speaks to me. At some point in the process I start to see what the painting is about. At that point the refining, rearranging and adjusting are a bit easier, because I have an emotional direction for the painting.

What inspired your choice of materials?

Acrylic is a great medium for this type of playing around, trying things out and changing things.

How does your work in this exhibition make an impact?

Hopefully these paintings make people think and make them smile. In general, I think that abstract art asks more of the viewer. The artwork isn’t always a quick read. It’s an invitation to look and think and feel. My paintings are kind of two sides of a coin. The ‘Mud Season’ ones are dark and rich, but with strong lights. They’re the contrast between the dark and messy parts of life and the brighter things, such as hope and joy. The brightly colored ones, from the ‘Early Spring’ series, are joyful and reminiscent of the contrast between snow and the coming spring. But that’s just my read on them. Everyone gets to bring their experience to the work and make their own judgments and their own stories.

Grace Mattern

Mixed media collage

What draws you to abstract art?

I’ve been a writer since I was young and have published two books of poetry. … Poetry is an abstraction of sorts, using as few words as possible to express the meaning of moments and events in our lives. Ten years ago I began to make image-based collages, layering figures and backgrounds to reflect multiple dimensions. That led me to an interest in combining image and text to create an additional layer of meaning. From there I began to make abstract collages because I was intrigued by the process of creating meaning without representational images. I enrolled in an online course in abstract collage in the spring of 2021. Through that class I learned different techniques for mark-making and printing collage papers and committed to a regular practice of collage-making. I’ve been regularly making abstract collages since.

Grace Mattern’s “Mending.”

What was your artistic process in creating pieces for this exhibition?

The pieces in the exhibit were created using techniques I’ve learned over the past year. The pieces arose from experimentation with techniques and materials and building trust in my instincts regarding composition and how to create meaning through abstraction.

What inspired your choice of materials?

I’m intrigued by meaning that can arise from unexpected combinations of materials. Sewing on paper, then painting the paper and cutting out shapes is included in three of the collages in the exhibit. I’m also drawn to the effects of layering transparent paper with varied prints, and what can emerge from that process. That’s reflected in the pieces in the show also.

How does your work in this exhibition make an impact?

As a longtime writer and somewhat beginner visual artist, I’ve always struggled with the question of how art has an impact in the world. I’m a lifelong social justice advocate, and worked for the New Hampshire Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence for 30 years. The current focus of my activism is racial justice and land conservation, which overlaps with recognizing the ongoing contributions of indigenous peoples who have stewarded this land for thousands of years. I believe that the act of creation itself is activism, as it’s a gift to the world to express ourselves through art, music, poetry, etc. I hope the impact of my work in the exhibition is to create excitement in people to find whatever creative expression is meaningful to them and put it out into the world.

Becky Barsi (Artsy Barsi)

Interdisciplinary with a focus on mixed media assemblage

What draws you to abstract art?

The element of experimentation, chance, and the unknown draw me to create abstract compositions.

From Becky Barsi’s “Texture in Motion” series.

What was your artistic process in creating pieces for this exhibition?

It all started by deconstructing a bullet and playing with the gunpowder inside. After a few singed fingertips I learned how to safely control this mild explosive. Following these experiments I considered the broader significance of this media and how it could be juxtaposed with traditional art media.

What inspired your choice of materials?

So much of my life is lived in motion. Going, going, going. I often forget to stop and observe the subtle details of the life around me. … ‘Texture in Motion’ is a response to the chaos of a life that had intended to be more reflective and aware. Developed over the past year, this mixed media work was created as a meditative process and bridges three unique media. The work plays with the physical properties of a fluid medium, bending and twisting, sometimes colliding with colors (acrylic ink). It is balanced by the varied, yet structured, textures that are interacted with on a daily basis (security envelopes) and are tied together by the contrasting unpredictability of a volatile explosive (black powder). This work is a reflection and metaphor of a life.

How does your work in this exhibition make an impact?

There is a visceral reaction to working with gunpowder that can’t be avoided. The anticipation of the ignition, when the flame touches the volatile grain, adds an extra beat to the rhythm of my heart. The chance, the unknown result of this material instantly impacting the surface and surrounding materials, adds to the anticipation and impact of this process.

A poet’s perspective
New Hampshire poet laureate Alice B. Fogel (2014-2019) will be at Twiggs Gallery On Saturday, April 16, from 1 to 3 p.m. She will be reading from her new book of poems inspired by abstract expressionist art, Nothing But: a series of indirect considerations on art & consciousness. There will be a book signing opportunity after. The event is free but seating is limited; reserve a ticket at twiggsgallery.wordpress.com.

How did you use abstract art to inspire your writing?
What I wanted to do was to start with abstract expressionist artworks — without describing or explaining them — and bring to language those same disruptions to our stream of consciousness that occur when we encounter the unexplainable. … I’m so grateful for the opportunity to transcend mundane logic by means of nonrepresentational material — mineral, color, form, texture, light, shadow — I hoped the poems would create a conversation about reality, illusion, embodiment, perception and thought itself.

Was there any piece in particular that originally made you think, ‘This could be the basis for a poem’?
The very first poem I think I wrote for this series was based on my response to a painting called ‘Field Notes, No. 59,’ by Andrew Moore, that I saw in a gallery in Asheville, North Carolina, Blue Spiral. (The poem is ‘Notes for 59,’ which opens the book.) I was so taken with it that I began to contemplate how abstract art, while not representing recognizable, ordered figures from our daily lives, can still represent a great and necessary part of our primal or archetypal human experience. I wondered if language could confound and re-orient us the same way.I took off from there.

How did you find the artwork that you drew your inspiration from? Local galleries? Online?
Some of it was from galleries, and a very few from artists whose work I already knew. But because I was injured and immobile at the time, I found most of it online through websites. Not the best way to view art, but it was a life-saver that I could view it at all.

Why abstract as opposed to representational art?
If I saw a painting and I could say, ‘That looks like a tree/house/river/anything!’ then I wouldn’t use it for this project. I didn’t even like using a totally abstract painting if it had a title that was too directive, like ‘Loneliness’ or ‘Rain in Winter.’ … I wanted to be affected in my heart or my gut or my skin while being clueless in my mind. I’m basically examining consciousness itself, building up a first-person plural, collective conversation, poem by poem, about reality and illusion, embodiment and spirit, perception and thought, as well as about art itself. Whether my response was infused with humor or wonder or ache, the art became … akin to a religion — a way to access the transcendent by means of pure material.

Explain the subtitle of your new book.
Thank you for asking about this.The book starts with an epigraph from William James’s The Stream of Consciousness, written in 1892: ‘Consciousness is in constant change … a series of indirect considerations…. The only breaches that can well be conceived to occur within the limits of a single mind would … be interruptions, time-gaps during which the consciousness went out….’ The book’s subtitle reflects that concept. … It’s probably no surprise … that these poems are not narratives or linear lyrics. So I also hoped that by providing a pretty concrete hint of what the poems are after, the subtitle would help people know what they were getting themselves into.

Twiggs is calling this exhibition “bold and powerful.” Do your poems fit that description as well?
That’s not for me to say, but that’s definitely how I think of the art that inspired the poems in this collection.

Featured photo: “If only…” by Ann Saunderson. Courtesy photo.

The Art Roundup 22/04/07

The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

Surreal paintings with a message: A new special exhibition featuring the work of Arghavan Khosravi opens at the Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester) on Thursday, April 14. The artist’s surrealist paintings explore themes such as exile, freedom and empowerment; center on female protagonists; and allude to human rights issues, particularly those affecting women and immigrants. The exhibition will remain on display through Monday, Sept. 5. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17, and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

Nature-inspired art: See Two Villages Art Society’s exhibition “Reawakening,on view at the Bates Building (846 Main St., Contoocook), before it’s gone on Saturday, April 9. It features work by artist members of the New Hampshire chapter of the Women’s Caucus for the Arts. “As sunshine and warmth return to the earth in spring, so we reawaken to our lives,” WCA/NH exhibitions committee chair Linda Greenwood said in a press release. “The theme not only illustrates our reawakening of spring, but it also represents an illustration of memories that remind us again of passions lying deep.” Regular gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372.

Catch the New Hampshire Art Association’s exhibition “Stitched Together – Elements of Nature from Textile Fragments, featuring the work of Cheryl Miller, at the Greater Concord

Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center (49 S. Main St., Concord) now through April 15. Miller, a textile artist, creates fabric collages using hand dyed cottons, batik and machine-stitched vintage fabrics. The exhibit includes a series of her textile collages inspired by the colors in nature. “The compositions are mostly abstract but also incorporate some elements of landscape, trees or leaves,” she said in a press release. “The idea of these pieces is to evoke a mood through the use of color and focus on small details in nature.” Gallery hours at the Chamber are Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. All works are for sale. Visit nhartassociation.org or call 431-4230.

Children interpret classical music: The New Hampshire Philharmonic Orchestra presents its annual “Drawn to the Music” concert on Saturday, April 9, and Sunday, April 10, at 2 p.m. at the Seifert Performing Arts Center at Salem High School (44 Geremonty Drive, Salem). The program will include music from Russian composer Igor Stravinsky’s ballet The Firebird, as well as “Night on Bald Mountain” by Modest Mussorgsky and “Mother Goose” by Maurice Ravel. The concert is a collaborative arts project for which elementary school students from across New Hampshire submitted their original artwork inspired by the featured music. According to a press release from the orchestra, more than 650 visual art pieces will be projected above the orchestra throughout the two performances “so audience members can experience the performance through each student’s creative vision.” The concert on Saturday will feature artwork by students from the Nashua area, and the concert on Sunday will feature artwork by students from Salem, Goffstown, Hooksett, Atkinson, Plaistow, Merrimack, Newington, Portsmouth, Farmington and Conway. Tickets cost $30 for adults, $25 for seniors age 60 and up, $8 for students age 21 and under and $5 for Salem School District students and must be purchased online in advance. A digital livestream option is also available for the Sunday concert for $15. Visit nhphil.org.


ART

Exhibits

• “REAWAKENING” Two Villages Art Society presents an exhibition featuring work by artist members of the New Hampshire chapter of the Women’s Caucus for the Arts. Bates Building (846 Main St., Contoocook). On display now through April 9. Regular gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372 for more information.

• “STITCHED TOGETHER – ELEMENTS OF NATURE FROM TEXTILE FRAGMENTS” New Hampshire Art Association exhibition features the textile collages of Cheryl Miller, inspired by the colors in nature. On display now through April 15. Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce Visitors Center. Regular gallery hours are Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. All work is for sale. Visit nhartassociation.org or call 431-4230 for more information.

• “APPEAL OF THE REAL: 19TH CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD” exhibition features photographs taken throughout the Mediterranean to record the ruins of ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display now through June 12. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “WARHOL SCREEN TESTS” In the mid-1960s, American multimedia artist Andy Warhol had shot more than 400 short, silent, black-and-white films of his friends at his studio in New York City. Warhol referred to the films, which were unscripted and played in slow motion, as “film portraits” or “stillies.” The exhibition will feature 20 of those films, provided by the Andy Warhol Museum, in loops across four large-scale projections. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display from March 31 through July 3. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “ARGHAVAN KHOSRAVI” Artist’s surrealist paintings explore themes of exile, freedom and empowerment; center female protagonists; and allude to human rights issues, particularly those affecting women and immigrants. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On display from April 14 through Sept. 5. Museum admission costs $15 for adults, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, $10 for students, $5 for youth ages 13 through 17 and is free for children age 12 and under and museum members. Current museum hours are Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday through Wednesday. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org for more information.

• “ECHOES: ABSTRACT PAINTING TO MODERN QUILTING” exhibition features abstract paintings inspired by the bold colors, asymmetry, improvisational layout, alternate grid work and negative space in composition of modern quilting. Two Villages Art Society (46 Main St., Contoocook). On display from April 22 through May 14. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372 for more information.

NATURE AT NIGHT: PAINTINGS BY OWEN KRZYZANIAK GEARY” Two Villages Art Society (46 Main St., Contoocook). On display from May 27 through June 18. Visit twovillagesart.org or call 413-210-4372 for more information.

ART ON MAIN The City of Concord and the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce present a year-round outdoor public art exhibition in Concord’s downtown featuring works by professional sculptors. All sculptures will be for sale. Visit concordnhchamber.com/creativeconcord, call 224-2508 or email tsink@concordnhchamber.com for more information.

Special events

UPCYCLED FASHION SHOW Presented by Makers Mill and the Governor Wentworth Arts Council. Designers of all ages are invited to create fashion pieces composed of at least 75 percent recycled, reused or repurposed materials. Sat., April 23, from 7 to 9 p.m. Makers Mill (23 Bay St., Wolfeboro). Registration for designers is free and open now through the end of March or until participation is full. Visit makersmill.org/blog or call 569-1500 for more information.

Workshops and classes

• “HANDS-ON 3D PRINTING FOR BEGINNERS” A one-day crash course covering the basics of 3D printing. Making Matters NH (88 Village St., Penacook). Sat., April 9, from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The cost is $15 for Making Matters members and $50 for nonmembers. Call 565-5443 or visit makingmattersnh.org for more information.

• “INTRO TO 3D PRINTING” Port City Makerspace (68 Morning St., Portsmouth). Wed., April 13 and June 8, from 6 to 9 p.m. The cost is $25 for members of the makerspace and $45 for nonmembers. Call 373-1002 or visit portcitymakerspace.com for more information.

THEATER

Classes/workshops

STORYTELLING WORKSHOPS Monthly workshop series hosted by True Tales Live storytelling showcase. First Tuesday (except November), from 7 to 8:30 p.m., virtual, via Zoom. Registration is required. Visit truetaleslivenh.org.

Shows

THE THEORY OF RELATIVITY The Anselmian Abbey Players present. Dana Center’s Koonz Theatre at Saint Anselm College (100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester). Sat., April 9, at 7:30 p.m., and Sun., April 10, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $10 for general admission and $8 for students. Seats are reserved in advance online. Visit anselm.edu/dana-center-humanities or call 641-7000.

LOVE, SEX, AND THE IRS The Majestic Theatre presents. Majestic Studio Theatre (880 Page St., Manchester). Fri., April 9, and Sat., April 10, at 7 p.m., and Sun., April 11, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20 for adults and $15 for students and seniors. Visit majestictheatre.net or call 669-7649.

PUFFS! OR SEVEN INCREASINGLY EVENTFUL YEARS AT A CERTAIN SCHOOL OF MAGIC AND MAGIC Cue Zero Theatre Co. presents. Granite State Arts Academy (19 Keewaydin Drive, No. 4, Salem). Fri., April 29, through Sun., May 1. Visit cztheatre.com for more information.

Classical

DRAWN TO THE MUSIC 2022 – STORIES IN MUSIC The New Hampshire Philharmonic Orchestra performs. Seifert Performing Arts Center, 44 Geremonty Drive, Salem. Sat., April 9, at 2 p.m., and Sun., April 10, at 2 p.m. Visit nhphil.org or call 647-6476 for more information.

Multicultural watercolors

Nashua exhibition represents faces from around the globe

Kavitha Chandrasekaran has painted every single day since she moved to Nashua three years ago, and now she’s sharing the products of that devotion in a solo exhibition at the Nashua Public Library.

“This is my first [show],” Chandrasekaran said. “I can’t believe I’ve created so many paintings.”

“Faces in Watercolors,” on display through April 30, features portraits of people from Africa, Vietnam, Thailand and India; the latter is Chandrasekaran’s homeland. She moved to the U.S. in 2013, first to Atlanta, then New York, finally landing in Nashua due to her husband’s job change.

Chandrasekaran said it was boredom that prompted her to pick up a paintbrush.

“When I came to Nashua my kids were very small, so I couldn’t get a full-time job,” said Chandrasekaran, who has a master’s in human physiology. “But when they napped I had some time.”

painting of three young boys, smiling
“Those Eyes.” Watercolor by Kavitha Chandrasekaran.

It was the first time Chandrasekaran had tried painting; previously the only art she’d done was drawing back in her early school days. She started by teaching herself how to paint with acrylics.

“[Then] I started exploring watercolor [and spent] hours scrolling on Instagram — Instagram made me try watercolor,” she laughed.

Chandrasekaran said she loves the way you can’t predict exactly how the watercolor effect is going to look when she’s working on the backgrounds for her portraits, but there’s a more practical reason why she’s stuck with watercolors.

“I don’t need lots of supplies, so when my kids wake up I can just pack up and put things away,” she laughed.

People’s faces resonate with Chandrasekaran in a way that landscape painting hasn’t; she’s tried the latter, but she said that after 10 or 15 paintings, she still didn’t like how they turned out.

Her desire to create a custom calendar with images of her children drew her into portraiture. She didn’t know how to draw figures, so she studied and taught herself the basics, then started to learn how to tell a story through the faces she paints.

“The eyes are very important to me because that is the most expressive part of a face,” she said.

For this exhibition, some of the portraits are based on photos she found on Instagram and was given permission to paint. Some she picks as a reference to start with and changes a little bit so they have their own unique look. The photos of Indigenous people in particular caught her eye.

“These photos were very expressive, and I got very attracted to their jewelry and [accessories],” Chandrasekaran said.

During this time when she hasn’t been able to travel to India, or anywhere really, for a couple of years, Chandrasekaran said immersing herself in the faces of people from around the globe has been a comfort. She is hoping, though, that she will be able to introduce her kids, who are 6 and 4, to India this summer. But for now, she’s embracing the cultures of Nashua.

“This is a foreign land to me, but I made it my home,” she said.

Chandrasekaran plans to keep painting and wants to try to submit some of her work to more galleries and become more familiar with the local art scene.

“The painting is what now keeps me going every day,” she said. “This is something that I enjoy and want to [continue to] explore.”

“Faces in Watercolors”
Where: The gallery at Nashua Public Library, 2 Court St.
When: Now through April 30 any time the library is open
Meet the artist: There will be an artist’s reception on Thursday, April 14, from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Visit: nashualibrary.org

Featured photo: “Akha.” Watercolor by Kavitha Chandrasekaran. Courtesy photo.

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