Treasure Hunt 24/05/16

Dear Donna,

Came across this in my dad’s garage. Can’t figure out what it was for or why he would have it. Can you shed any light on it?

Roger

Dear Roger,

I can share what I know about it with you. I have seen many right in the Manchester mills area. They were used in the bricks for architectural supports in the late 1800s. The stars are still visible in some of the old factories still today.

Along with stars there were other shapes and forms. So not only were they architectural, but they were decorative as well.

Your dad’s being attached to a fragment of the original iron bar shows it’s a real one. Could have even been from right here in New Hampshire.

There are many reproductions out there. But the authentic ones usually run in the $80+ range. So nice treasure, Roger. Thanks for sharing.

Treasure Hunt 24/05/09

Dear Donna,

I inherited this punch bowl from my grandmother. I have four matching cups with it. Everything is in good shape. Can you give me an evaluation on it?

Thank you, Donna.

Cindy

Dear Cindy,

Thanks for all the photos, Cindy; they really help.

Your Heisey punch bowl is from the early 1900s and is the fluted pattern. Heisey was produced in Ohio and has an interesting history.

Your punch bowl in the fluted pattern most likely had at least a dozen punch cups. You could collect older ones today to complete your set again.

The values used to be at least triple what they are today. Heisey glass was mass-produced along with several others from the same period.

Condition, patterns and rarity all still come into play for pricing. I found values in the range of under $100 for the punch bowl itself. Note: The punch bowl base has a second use when separated from the bowl, as a flower vase. Sweet!

I hope this helped, Cindy, and thanks for sharing.

Treasure Hunt 24/04/25

Dear Donna,

Time to clean out. Wondering if there is any value to these homemade Barbie-size doll clothes made by my mom for my sister and myself. I have fond memories of playing with them. Tried to pass them on but no interest these days. What to do with them?

Thank you, Donna.

Cynthia

Dear Cynthia,

Your dresses bring back memories for me as well.

Handmade doll clothes (hand-stitched and sewing machine-made) can be collectible. I think the older the better, and detailing, material, condition etc. all come into play for value.

Barbie-era clothes would all have value to a collector. The patterns on ones like yours are so “modern”-looking. How fun to mix in with original Barbie outfits.

The value I think is in the buyer. I would think in the $5+ range for each outfit. The elaborate or wild could even bring lots more!

Cynthia, thanks for the memory and I hope you find a new home for the clothes.

Donna Welch has spent more than 35 years in the antiques and collectibles field, appraising and instructing. Her new location is an Antique Art Studio located in Dunbarton where she is still buying and selling. If you have questions about an antique or collectible send a clear photo and information to Donna at footwdw@aol.com, or call her at 391-6550.

Treasure Hunt 24/04/18

Dear Donna,

Can you suggest ways for me to find two more of these feet? I have a table that has two missing. It was my grandma’s and I’m trying to restore it for my dining room. I think the foot is brass and measures 3 inches by 2 inches. Thanks for any help!

Brad

Dear Brad,

I’m thinking your table must be a Duncan Phyfe-style table. The paw feet are common and get slid on to the end of the table legs.

I would start by looking at flea markets in your area. Take it with you to try for an exact match. If not you might find three others that will fit.

Next I would call a few antiques shops and explain what you have. Sometimes shop dealers carry many furniture replacement parts.

Also you might want to try a furniture refinishing place. They too usually have extra parts set aside.

Brad, you can expect to pay anywhere from $1 to $10 each depending on where you find them.

I don’t think your hunt will be too hard. There are many feet of this style around still today. Thanks for asking and have fun hunting!

Treasure Hunt 24/04/11

Dear Donna,

Is this record player a throw-away? Would someone use this still? Thank you for any help.

Amy

Dear Amy,

My No. 1 rule is there is almost always a reason to save things from the past.

Your Webcor Lark record player is from the 1950s. Being a portable one, it does have its charm.

To determine whether there is value, you have to consider its overall condition, whether it is a complete unit, and whether it’s in working condition.

Let’s just say yes is the answer to all. The value would be in the $75 range to a record or player collector. If it’s not in working condition I would say there’s some value for any working parts.

I think for marketing it I would start at a retail store that sells old records, for both selling and more information.

I hope this was helpful, Amy, and that you can find a new home for your player.

Treasure Hunt 24/04/04

Hello, Donna,

I have had these two candlesticks for about 45 years and have always wondered what their value may be. They are from my grandparents. I believe they are brass, and they are stamped on the bottom Tiffany Studios New York 1201. Could you give me a value on them?

Thank you.

Lisa

Dear Lisa,

Beautiful set of Tiffany Studios candlesticks!

Your bronze gold dore (meaning bronze with a gold gilt/wash over them) candlesticks date to the early 1900s. They are called cat’s paw due to the streamline design ending in a paw bottom. They appear to be in great original condition.

The value on them as a pair would be in the $3,000 range to a collector. Singles sell for less each. Having both makes them more desirable.

Lisa, your grandparents left you a treasure that will do nothing but increase with time. Enjoy them!

Hope this was helpful, Jake.

Treasure Hunt 24/03/28

Hello, Donna,

I have had these two candlesticks for about 45 years and have always wondered what their value may be. They are from my grandparents. I believe they are brass, and they are stamped on the bottom Tiffany Studios New York 1201. Could you give me a value on them?

Thank you.

Lisa

Dear Lisa,

Beautiful set of Tiffany Studios candlesticks!

Your bronze gold dore (meaning bronze with a gold gilt/wash over them) candlesticks date to the early 1900s. They are called cat’s paw due to the streamline design ending in a paw bottom. They appear to be in great original condition.

The value on them as a pair would be in the $3,000 range to a collector. Singles sell for less each. Having both makes them more desirable.

Lisa, your grandparents left you a treasure that will do nothing but increase with time. Enjoy them!

Hope this was helpful, Jake.

Feature Photo: Tiffany candlesticks.

Treasure Hunt 24/03/21

Dear Donna,

OK, can you help me figure this out? It says Ralston on it. It’s also marked “Eat Ralston Daily.”

Can you help?

Jake

Dear Jake,

I’m not quite sure how it works but it somehow tells time. When you hold it up to the sun it can turn and give you time.

It’s a Ralston cereal toy (premium). The company produced cereal from the late 1800s to the 1990s. The name probably seems more familiar as Ralston Purina.

I can remember when I was younger begging my mom to buy any cereal with a good toy in it. Premiums are collectible and range from a dollar to very high values, depending on what it is, from what cereal, how many were produced and condition.

The value of yours, Jake, is in the $40 range to a collector. So a nice little premium find.

Hope this was helpful, Jake.

Feature Photo: Vintage Cereal Toy. Courtesy Photo.

Treasure Hunt 24/03/14

Hi, Donna,

I have this hat which I have researched and found on The Met art site. Could you give me a value on it and tell me if you know any dealers who might be interested in it? I also have a number of 1950s and 1960s felt ladies dress hats.

Thank you.

Paul

Dear Paul,

Your silk top hat from the late 1800s looks to be in great condition. After doing research myself on it, I found values to be in the range of $200+. That would be top value to a collector, or as an actor accessory or for re-enactment purposes.

Antique and vintage clothing is a specific market. If you can find someone local in New Hampshire to purchase the top hat and ladies felt hats I would think you would be looking at half the value if not less. Keep in mind, Paul, they then have to find the top market for them. That takes time!

Remember always, though, the hats’ condition would be key to a purchaser. I don’t have a referral for you, but hopefully we might find one with your story.

Thank you for sharing, Paul, and let’s hope we can help you.

Donna

Donna Welch has spent more than 35 years in the antiques and collectibles field, appraising and instructing. Her new location is an antique art studio located in Dunbarton where she is still buying and selling. If you have questions about an antique or collectible send a clear photo and information to Donna at footwdw@aol.com, or call her at 391-6550.

Treasure Hunt 24/02/29

Dear Donna,

What do you do with old paperback books? Is there value or are they to be put in recycling?

Thanks, Donna, for any help.

Cindy

Dear Cindy,

Antique books and even more modern books are in a field of their own. I might be able to give you some information. You might also want to try a used bookstore or do some online research on each book, the value of which will depend on the author, the specific title, whether it is signed by the author and other factors. Then remember as always condition matters. I would think this rule follows all books through the ages.

Your Western books look fun and interesting to read. Figure out how many editions there were of each book as well as those other factors to see if some could be worth trying to sell. If not, you could donate them to a library or used bookstore or recycle them. I prefer donation, so someone else could enjoy reading them.

Thanks, Cindy, for sharing, I hope you find a new home for your books — or maybe even a tiny treasure in the pile.

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