Treasure Hunt 24/06/13

Dear Donna,

Thought you would enjoy this couple. I’m not sure but I think my grandmother made them. They are all hand stitched and have tiny nuts for heads. I know they are in tough condition but I can’t just toss them. What are your thoughts about possibly finding them a new home?

Thanks, Donna, for any information.

Tracy

Dear Tracy,

You are right! They are sweet.

Your grandmother could have made them but it’s tough to tell now. They are from the middle to late 1800s if that helps. They are not that uncommon either. I have seen many different versions throughout my career.

Nut dolls, apple head dolls, and later clothespin dolls are around. Some are considered a form of folk art. Yours definitely fall into that category. Being in tough condition doesn’t help, but there are collectors for them. The older the better, and the more detail the better as well. I find yours very charming. I would say they would run in the $100 range to a collector.

Tracy, I hope this was helpful. I also agree not to toss them and do find them a new home. Try bringing them to a local antique store near you. Remember they can’t pay full value because they will have to sell them too.

Donna Welch has spent more than 35 years in the antiques and collectibles field, appraising and instructing. Her new location is an Antique Art Studio located in Dunbarton, NH where she is still buying and selling. If you have questions about an antique or collectible send a clear photo and information to Donna at footwdw@aol.com, or call her at 391-6550.

Donna Welch has spent more than 35 years in the antiques and collectibles field, appraising and instructing. Her new location is an Antique Art Studio located in Dunbarton, NH where she is still buying and selling. If you have questions about an antique or collectible send a clear photo and information to Donna at footwdw@aol.com, or call her at 391-6550.

Treasure Hunt 24/06/06

Hi, Donna,

These boat lanterns were in our camp at the lake, which was built in 1910. I’m not sure of the history, other than that my grandfather did have an old single-cylinder Laker boat in the 1920s, which the two oil lamps may have been on. Or it’s possible he obtained them from someone for possible use on his boat.

I would be very interested to know what you think their value might be.

Thank you.

Larry

Dear Larry,

Your boat lights all appear to be in great condition,all the glass intact. Maritime items are always collectible. Some more than others, and values fluctuate.

I found values for yours to be in the range of $100 to $200 each. Less for the electric ones. The value is priceless to find out if they were on your grandfather’s boat. Stories they could tell, right?

Thanks for sharing with us, Larry, and I hope this was helpful.

Donna

Donna Welch has spent more than 35 years in the antiques and collectibles field, appraising and instructing. Her new location is an Antique Art Studio located in Dunbarton, NH where she is still buying and selling. If you have questions about an antique or collectible send a clear photo and information to Donna at footwdw@aol.com, or call her at 391-6550.

Treasure Hunt 24/05/30

Dear Donna,

I saw your article in the Hippo and was hoping you could take a look at these few pieces of antique furniture we have of my mother’s and great aunt’s. We are looking to possibly sell the pieces but are not sure of their current worth and do not have much information about them.

Do you possibly have any info or thoughts on a value if we were to sell them in their current condition?

Thank you for your time.

Karen

Dear Karen,

I have to start by saying all the furniture looks to be in great clean and usable condition.

Now for the tough part. Antique and old furniture seems to have really gotten less interest in the past 10 years for common pieces. The modern, more light style of decorating doesn’t want to fill a room with warmth. To me that’s what old and antique furniture is. Also has lots of history to it.

The values on the pieces you sent photos of would be in the $50-to-$100 range. Now you have to find a market for them. Advertising in your town would bring you the most value. Bringing in a buyer might mean lower prices. Remember they have to then re-sell them. If you could find a use for them in the family that would be priceless!

Thanks for reaching out and I hope this helps.

Donna

Treasure Hunt 24/05/23

Hi, Donna,

Wondering if you could give me some information on this melodeon. I purchased it from a coworker who was moving and didn’t want to bring it with him. He said it had been in his family for quite some time but his children didn’t want it.

I haven’t been able to find much information online, and I would really appreciate any info you could provide.

Thank you so much.

Alan

Dear Alan,

I have actually had one of these before from the same makers in Concord, New Hampshire.

Your Parker and Secomb melodeon was produced right here in New Hampshire during the middle to late 1800s. The values are all over the place for melodeons from different makers. In good clean working order I found some as high as $3,000 and some for several hundred.

The couple I found from the same maker and style were in the $900 range. That would be an approximate value; selling it could bring a different one. Doesn’t seem the interest in them these days is too high.

I hope this was helpful, Alan, and glad to see it has a new home. Thanks for sharing your New Hampshire-made piece with us.

Treasure Hunt 24/05/16

Dear Donna,

Came across this in my dad’s garage. Can’t figure out what it was for or why he would have it. Can you shed any light on it?

Roger

Dear Roger,

I can share what I know about it with you. I have seen many right in the Manchester mills area. They were used in the bricks for architectural supports in the late 1800s. The stars are still visible in some of the old factories still today.

Along with stars there were other shapes and forms. So not only were they architectural, but they were decorative as well.

Your dad’s being attached to a fragment of the original iron bar shows it’s a real one. Could have even been from right here in New Hampshire.

There are many reproductions out there. But the authentic ones usually run in the $80+ range. So nice treasure, Roger. Thanks for sharing.

Treasure Hunt 24/05/09

Dear Donna,

I inherited this punch bowl from my grandmother. I have four matching cups with it. Everything is in good shape. Can you give me an evaluation on it?

Thank you, Donna.

Cindy

Dear Cindy,

Thanks for all the photos, Cindy; they really help.

Your Heisey punch bowl is from the early 1900s and is the fluted pattern. Heisey was produced in Ohio and has an interesting history.

Your punch bowl in the fluted pattern most likely had at least a dozen punch cups. You could collect older ones today to complete your set again.

The values used to be at least triple what they are today. Heisey glass was mass-produced along with several others from the same period.

Condition, patterns and rarity all still come into play for pricing. I found values in the range of under $100 for the punch bowl itself. Note: The punch bowl base has a second use when separated from the bowl, as a flower vase. Sweet!

I hope this helped, Cindy, and thanks for sharing.

Treasure Hunt 24/04/25

Dear Donna,

Time to clean out. Wondering if there is any value to these homemade Barbie-size doll clothes made by my mom for my sister and myself. I have fond memories of playing with them. Tried to pass them on but no interest these days. What to do with them?

Thank you, Donna.

Cynthia

Dear Cynthia,

Your dresses bring back memories for me as well.

Handmade doll clothes (hand-stitched and sewing machine-made) can be collectible. I think the older the better, and detailing, material, condition etc. all come into play for value.

Barbie-era clothes would all have value to a collector. The patterns on ones like yours are so “modern”-looking. How fun to mix in with original Barbie outfits.

The value I think is in the buyer. I would think in the $5+ range for each outfit. The elaborate or wild could even bring lots more!

Cynthia, thanks for the memory and I hope you find a new home for the clothes.

Donna Welch has spent more than 35 years in the antiques and collectibles field, appraising and instructing. Her new location is an Antique Art Studio located in Dunbarton where she is still buying and selling. If you have questions about an antique or collectible send a clear photo and information to Donna at footwdw@aol.com, or call her at 391-6550.

Treasure Hunt 24/04/18

Dear Donna,

Can you suggest ways for me to find two more of these feet? I have a table that has two missing. It was my grandma’s and I’m trying to restore it for my dining room. I think the foot is brass and measures 3 inches by 2 inches. Thanks for any help!

Brad

Dear Brad,

I’m thinking your table must be a Duncan Phyfe-style table. The paw feet are common and get slid on to the end of the table legs.

I would start by looking at flea markets in your area. Take it with you to try for an exact match. If not you might find three others that will fit.

Next I would call a few antiques shops and explain what you have. Sometimes shop dealers carry many furniture replacement parts.

Also you might want to try a furniture refinishing place. They too usually have extra parts set aside.

Brad, you can expect to pay anywhere from $1 to $10 each depending on where you find them.

I don’t think your hunt will be too hard. There are many feet of this style around still today. Thanks for asking and have fun hunting!

Treasure Hunt 24/04/11

Dear Donna,

Is this record player a throw-away? Would someone use this still? Thank you for any help.

Amy

Dear Amy,

My No. 1 rule is there is almost always a reason to save things from the past.

Your Webcor Lark record player is from the 1950s. Being a portable one, it does have its charm.

To determine whether there is value, you have to consider its overall condition, whether it is a complete unit, and whether it’s in working condition.

Let’s just say yes is the answer to all. The value would be in the $75 range to a record or player collector. If it’s not in working condition I would say there’s some value for any working parts.

I think for marketing it I would start at a retail store that sells old records, for both selling and more information.

I hope this was helpful, Amy, and that you can find a new home for your player.

Treasure Hunt 24/04/04

Hello, Donna,

I have had these two candlesticks for about 45 years and have always wondered what their value may be. They are from my grandparents. I believe they are brass, and they are stamped on the bottom Tiffany Studios New York 1201. Could you give me a value on them?

Thank you.

Lisa

Dear Lisa,

Beautiful set of Tiffany Studios candlesticks!

Your bronze gold dore (meaning bronze with a gold gilt/wash over them) candlesticks date to the early 1900s. They are called cat’s paw due to the streamline design ending in a paw bottom. They appear to be in great original condition.

The value on them as a pair would be in the $3,000 range to a collector. Singles sell for less each. Having both makes them more desirable.

Lisa, your grandparents left you a treasure that will do nothing but increase with time. Enjoy them!

Hope this was helpful, Jake.

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