2021 Summer Guide

With the return of many live and in-person events, Summer 2021 is already looking more action-packed than last year, as many venues are reopening with a full slate of concerts, theater, art exhibits and more. Use this guide to help you fill your summer with fun, from now through Labor Day.

Fairs & Festivals

Check out this list of expos, town fairs, old home day festivals and more scheduled to return across the Granite State now through Labor Day weekend. For the most up-to-date details on the status of these events, be sure to visit their websites or social media channels directly.

• Join the Manchester Firing Line (2540 Brown Ave.) for a free vintage car show every Monday night from 5 to 8 p.m. now through Labor Day. Bring a car you want to show off or just come to see the vintage displays. Visit gunsnh.com.

• The Meredith Memorial Day Weekend Craft Festival is happening Saturday, May 29, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, May 30, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Monday, May 31, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Mill Falls Marketplace (Route 3, Meredith). More than 100 juried craftsmen and artisans will sell handmade jewelry, pottery, wall art, textiles, woodwork, leatherwork and more. Admission is free. Visit castleberryfairs.com.

• Goffstown Main Street is planning an Old Home Weekend for Saturday, June 5, and Sunday, June 6, in Goffstown Village, featuring games, a kids’ fishing derby, a charity auction and more. Visit goffstownmainstreet.org/old-home-day.

• The Queen City Pride Festival will return to Arms Park (10 Arms St., Manchester) on Saturday, June 19, from noon to 6 p.m., and will feature local vendor booths, live entertainment and more. Visit queencitypridenh.org.

• The New Hampshire Farm Museum (1305 White Mountain Hwy., Milton) has a children’s day event tentatively scheduled for Saturday, June 19, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Kids can get their pictures taken with the farm’s animals and try their hand at horseshoes, bean bags, hoops of grace and more. Museum admission is $10 for adults, $7.50 for seniors over 64, $5 for kids and teens ages 4 and up, and free for kids under 4 and for members and active military service men and women. Visit nhfarmmuseum.org.

• The next New England Reptile Expo is scheduled for Sunday, June 27, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the DoubleTree by Hilton Manchester Downtown (700 Elm St.). Pre-purchased admission tickets will go on sale beginning June 12 — the cost is $10 for adults, $5 for kids ages 7 to 12 and free for kids under 6. Visit reptileexpo.com.

Fourth on the Farm, an annual Fourth of July celebration at the New Hampshire Farm Museum (1305 White Mountain Hwy., Milton) is set for Sunday, July 4, from noon to 3 p.m. Guides in period dress will be serving strawberry shortcake with homemade whipped cream on the porch, while local musicians will be performing and tractor rides will be available throughout the farm. Museum admission is $10 for adults, $7.50 for seniors over 64, $5 for kids and teens ages 4 and up, and free for kids under 4 and for members and active military servicemen and women. Visit nhfarmmuseum.org.

• Don’t miss the Hillsborough Summerfest, set for Thursday, July 8, through Sunday, July 11, at Grimes Field (29 Preston St., Hillsborough). The event features carnival rides, a beer tent, live music and a town parade on Sunday. Festival hours are 6 to 10 p.m. on Thursday, 5 to 11 p.m. on Friday, noon to 11 p.m. on Saturday and noon to 5:30 p.m. on Sunday. Visit hillsborosummerfest.com.

• The Raymond Town Fair, a multi-day event on the town common featuring contests, parades, live entertainment, children’s activities and more, is tentatively scheduled to return from Friday, July 9, through Sunday, July 11. Find them on Facebook @raymondtownfair for updates.

• The American Independence Museum (1 Governors Lane, Exeter) is presenting a modified version of its annual American Independence Festival, offering a series of in-person and virtual events, like a family camp out on the night of Saturday, July 24, in which participants can play colonial-era games, sing 18th-century songs by the fire and more. Visit independencemuseum.org.

• This year’s Weare Rally, presented by the Merrimack Valley Military Vehicle Collectors Club, is tentatively scheduled from Thursday, July 29, through Saturday, July 31. Visit mvmvc.org for updates.

• The Belknap County Fair is due to return on Saturday, Aug. 7, and Sunday, Aug. 8, at 174 Mile Hill Road in Belmont. Visit bcfairnh.org for updates.

• The 64th annual New Hampshire Antiques Show is tentatively scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 12, through Saturday, Aug. 14, at the DoubleTree by Hilton Manchester Downtown (700 Elm St.). The event features antique dealers from all over the region selling their various wares. Show hours are from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursday and Friday, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. The cost is $15 admission on Thursday and $10 admission on Friday and Saturday. Visit nhada.org.

Londonderry’s Old Home Days return from Wednesday, Aug. 18, through Saturday, Aug. 21, and will feature town parades, games, local vendors and more. Find them on Facebook @townoflondonderryoldhomeday.

• Intown Concord’s annual Market Days Festival, a three-day free street festival, is set to return to Main Street in downtown Concord from Thursday, Aug. 19, through Saturday, Aug. 21. Visit marketdaysfestival.com for the list of ongoing happenings, which have included tastings, live entertainment, a kids zone and more.

History Alive returns to the town of Hillsborough on Saturday, Aug. 21, and Sunday, Aug. 22, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and will feature live historical re-enactors, live music, presentations, demonstrations and more. Visit historyalivenh.org.

Plaistow’s Old Home Day will be held on Saturday, Aug. 28, at 51 Old County Road in Plaistow. Visit plaistowohd.com.

Candia’s Old Home Day is set for Saturday, Aug. 28, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Candia Moore Park, next to the town hall (74 High St.), and will likely feature wildlife exhibitors, local vendor booths, a parade and more. Visit candiaoldhomeday.com.

• The Manchester Rotary Club will present the 20th annual Cruising Downtown classic car show event on Saturday, Sept. 4, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Around 1,000 unique vehicles will be on display along Elm Street and nearby areas. Visit manchesterrotary.org.

What about this event?
Looking for these big summer events? Here are a few that have been pushed back a bit later in the year than normal.
• Intown Manchester’s Taco Tour is tentatively set to return sometime in mid-September, according to executive director Sara Beaudry. Find them on Facebook @intownmanch.

• The New Hampshire Bacon & Beer Festival, normally held in May, has a new date of Saturday, Sept. 11, in Merrimack. Visit nhbaconbeer.com.

• The Children’s Museum of New Hampshire (6 Washington St., Dover) has rescheduled its annual NH Maker & Food Fest to Saturday, Sept. 18. Visit childrens-museum.org.

• Portsmouth’s Market Square Day has been rescheduled from mid-June to Saturday, Sept. 18, in downtown Portsmouth. Visit proportsmouth.org.

Food

Enjoy some of the tastiest of what New Hampshire has to offer this summer, from both in-person and drive-thru festivals to cooking workshops, tastings and more.

• The Grazing Room at The Colby Hill Inn (33 The Oaks, Henniker) continues its Sunday Night Out event series every Sunday through Aug. 29, when the eatery features a local seafood raw bar, a special barbecue-themed a la carte menu, and flight trios of beer, wine and sake, in addition to hosting a different live music act each week courtesy of the New Hampshire Music Collective. Seatings are outdoors from 4 to 7 p.m. each evening, with reservations required. Visit colbyhillinn.com.

• Join the New Hampshire Farm Museum (1305 White Mountain Hwy., Milton) for Dairy Day on Saturday, May 29, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Kids can learn how to make butter, ice cream and cheese, play farm games, go on a tractor-drawn ride and partake in a barn scavenger hunt with prizes. Admission is $10 for adults, $7.50 for seniors over 65, $5 for kids and teens ages 4 and up, and free for children under 4, museum members and active military service members. Visit nhfarmmuseum.org.

• As with last year, Temple B’Nai Israel (210 Court St., Laconia) will hold its New Hampshire Jewish Food Festival virtually, with online ordering open from June 1 to June 27. Visit tbinh.org to order from the temple’s menu of traditional Jewish-style foods — curbside pickups will be by appointment between Friday, July 30, and Sunday, Aug. 1.

• Concord Hospital Trust will present The Beat Goes on Block Party, an evening of spirit, beer and wine tasting, on Friday, June 4, at the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center (2 Institute Drive, Concord). Guests will sample local restaurants’ and food trucks’ offerings, which will be thoughtfully paired with quality wines, craft beers, spirits and creative mocktails from local and regional breweries, vineyards and distilleries. The block party-style event will be held in the front parking entryway of the center. General admission is $65, with access to the event from 7 to 9 p.m., while VIP admission is $100 (guests receive admittance to the event an hour early). Visit ch-trust.org or call Concord Hospital Trust at 227-7162 to purchase tickets.

• The New Hampshire Herbal Network will present its Herb & Garden Day on Saturday, June 5, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on the grounds of the Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum (18 Highlawn Road, Warner). The annual event brings together herbal educators and seasonal growers for a day of multi-interest level workshops, plus a large vendor fair featuring plants and herbs from local farmers. The event is open to the public. Visit nhherbalnetwork.wordpress.com/herbalday.

• The Friends of the Library of Windham are hosting a drive-thru strawberry festival on Saturday, June 5, with curbside pickup from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the parking lot of Shaw’s (43 Indian Rock Road, Windham). Strawberry shortcake family fun packs are available to pre-order now, which will include handmade biscuits, ice cream, strawberries and whipped cream. Visit flowwindham.org.

• Hampstead Congregational Church (61 Main St.) has its annual strawberry festival scheduled for Saturday, June 5, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., featuring strawberry shortcake, baked goods, raffles, a plant sale and more. Admission is free. See “Hampstead Congregational Church, UCC” on Facebook for more details.

• LaBelle Winery’s new Derry location (14 Route 111) will host its next cooking with wine class on Wednesday, June 9, at 6 p.m., which will dabble in healthy, homemade Chinese food recipes. Participants will learn how to make items like chicken and scallion dumplings, edamame and mushroom fried rice, and each item will be paired with wine. General admission is $32.70, including taxes. LaBelle’s flagship location at 345 Route 101 in Amherst will also host a cooking with wine class specializing in outdoor cocktail party recipes, scheduled for Thursday, June 24, at 6 p.m. Visit labellewinery.com.

The Culinary Playground (16 Manning St., Derry) has several upcoming cooking classes for both kids and adults on its schedule, including a seafood supper class for couples on Friday, June 11, and Saturday, June 12, and a Dad’s day cinnamon rolls class for kids on Sunday, June 20. Visit culinary-playground.com to view the full schedule.

• Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church (68 N. State St., Concord) has its next boxed Greek dinner to go event scheduled for Sunday, June 13, when fresh gyro sandwiches will be available. The event is drive-thru and takeout only — email ordermygreekfood@gmail.com or call 953-3051 to place your order.

• Join The Cozy Tea Cart of Brookline for garden afternoon tea on Sunday, June 13, from 1 to 3 p.m., at the Gatherings at The Colonel Shepard House (29 Mont Vernon St., Milford). Tickets are $39.95 per person and reservations are required. Visit thecozyteacart.com.

• Derry’s Taste of the Region event is due to return to the parking lot of the Tupelo Music Hall (10 A St., Derry) on Wednesday, June 16, from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Organized by the Greater Derry Londonderry Chamber of Commerce, Taste of the Region brings together more than 30 area food and beverage vendors that compete for fan favorites in three categories: savory, sips and sweets. Admission is $35 per person. Visit gdlchamber.org.

• The Cozy Tea Cart of Brookline has several virtual tea tastings on its schedule, the next of which is set for Saturday, June 19, from 4 to 5:30 p.m., dabbling in green and white teas. Reservations are required by June 5 — participants will be mailed a tea tasting kit prior to this event. Visit thecozyteacart.com.

• Join LaBelle Winery (14 Route 111, Derry) for a wine and cheese pairing on Wednesday, June 16, at 6 p.m. LaBelle’s wine educator Marie King and culinary director Peter Agostinelli will guide participants through the how and why of wine and cheese pairing, tasting five types of fine cheeses paired with five different wines. Tickets are $38.15 general admission per person (including taxes). Visit labellewinery.com.

• Learn how grapes are harvested at LaBelle Winery (345 Route 101, Amherst) during the next event in its Walks in the Vineyard series, scheduled for Sunday, July 11, from 11 a.m. to noon. Wine educator Marie King and vineyard manager Josh Boisvert will lead participants through a fun and educational walk through the vineyards. You’ll also get a chance to taste four LaBelle wines throughout the session.Tickets are $27.25 general admission per person (including taxes). Visit labellewinery.com.

• The next wine dinners at the Colby Hill Inn (33 The Oaks, Henniker), set for Friday, July 16, and Saturday, July 17, will feature an a la carte barbecue lunch, McPrice Myers wines and live music. Visit colbyhillinn.com.

• Monadnock Music is presenting a Progressive Garden Party with multiple tastings and performances across the town of Peterborough on Sunday, July 18, from 1 to 4 p.m. Your ticket to this botanical tour will include three different drinks, food tastings and musical performances. Tickets are $75. Visit monadnockmusic.org for a full list of event locations.

• The Great New England BBQ & Food Truck Festival will return to the Hampshire Dome (34 Emerson Road, Milford) on Saturday, Aug. 14, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., featuring food trucks, live music, eating contests, craft beer, a kids zone and more. Tickets are $5 in advance and $10 at the gate (free for kids ages 14 and under). Visit gnecraftartisanshows.com.

Mahrajan, an annual Middle Eastern food festival held on the grounds of Our Lady of the Cedars Church (140 Mitchell St., Manchester), is due to return this year with tentative dates of Friday, Aug. 20, through Sunday, Aug. 22. Visit bestfestnh.com for updates.

• Windham High School (64 London Bridge Road) has scheduled a food truck festival for Sunday, Aug. 22, at noon. Visit windhamnh.gov.

• In lieu of its traditional beer festival and wing competition format, this year’s Gate City Brewfest will be pivoting to a live concert to be held at Holman Stadium (67 Amherst St., Nashua) on Friday, Aug. 27. The live concert being planned in its place will offer both stadium and pod-style lawn seating on the field, plus an assortment of beer, non-alcoholic beverages and food options available. Visit gatecitybrewfestnh.com.

• Assumption Greet Orthodox Church (111 Island Pond Road in Manchester; assumptionnh.org) will hold its Greekfest Express on Saturday, Aug. 28. As with their celebrations of Greek food throughout the last year, this event will be drive-through with food available for order in advance. See foodfest.assumptionnh.org.

Theater

With warmer weather and loosened restrictions on public events, many local theater companies are coming out of hiatus this summer, offering outdoor, in-theater and virtual performances.

•​ The Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) presents Fun Home on Thursday, May 27, at 7:30 p.m., and Friday, May 28, at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $32 to $46. Visit seacoastrep.org.

• The Capitol Center for the Arts in Concord presentsRhapsody in Black, a one-man show byLeLand Gantt, virtually, on demand, free of charge, now through June 30. Visit ccanh.com.

•​ The Rotary Park Play Festival takes place on Saturday, May 29, and Sunday, May 30, from 3 to 5 p.m. at Rotary Park (30 Beacon St. E., Laconia). The festival, presented by Powerhouse Theatre Collaborative and Community Players of Concord, features short original plays by New Hampshire playwrights. Admission is free; donations are welcome. Visit belknapmill.org.

•​ The Kids Coop Theatre performs You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown on Saturday, May 29, at 1 and 7 p.m. at the Derry Opera House (29 W. Broadway, Derry). Tickets cost $15. Visit kids-coop-theatre.org.

•​ The Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) presents Godspell on Saturday, May 29, at 2 and 8 p.m., and Sunday, May 30, at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $32 to $44. The show is also available to livestream. Visit seacoastrep.org.

• The Palace Youth Theatre will perform James and the Giant Peach Jr. at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) June 4 through June 12, with showtimes on Friday, Saturday, Monday and Tuesday at 7 p.m., except for Sunday, June 12, which is at noon. Tickets cost $12 for children and $15 for adults. Visit palacetheatre.org.

• The Capitol Center for the Arts in Concord presents a livestream of Concord Dance Academy’s annual recital on Saturday, June 5, at 1 p.m. Tickets cost $20. Visit ccanh.com.

• The New Hampshire Theatre Project (959 Islington St., Portsmouth) presents The Uncertainty Principle virtually on Thursday, June 10, through Saturday, June 12, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, June 13, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20. Visit nhtheatreproject.org.

•​ Pippin will be at the Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) June 10 through July 17, with showtimes on Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m., and Sunday at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $32 to $50. The show is also available to livestream. Visit seacoastrep.org.

• Phylloxera Productions brings Holmes and Watson to the Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord) June 11 through June 27, with showtimes on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for members, seniors and students, and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

• Seacoast Civic Dance Co. will perform its 64th Annual Dance Showcase at The Music Hall Historic Theater (28 Chestnut St., Portsmouth) on Saturday, June 12, at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $20 to $30. Visit themusichall.org.

•​ The Winnipesaukee Playhouse (33 Footlight Circle, Meredith) presents Betrayal outdoors June 16 through July 3, with showtimes Tuesday through Saturday, at 4 p.m. Tickets cost $27 to $37. Visit winnipesaukeeplayhouse.org.

• The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord) presents Discovering Magic with Andrew Pinard on Wednesdays, June 16, July 14 and Aug. 11, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for members, seniors and students, and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

• The Palace Teen Apprentice Company will perform Xanadu Jr. at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) on Thursday, June 17, and Friday, June 18, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $12 for children and $15 for adults. Visit palacetheatre.org.

Queen City Improv comes to the Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord) on Thursdays, June 17, July 15 and Aug. 12, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for members, seniors and students, and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

•​ The Majestic Theatre presents Steel Magnoliasat the Majestic Studio Theatre (880 Page St., Manchester) June 18 through June 27, with showtimes on Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20 for adults and $15 for youth and seniors. Visit majestictheatre.net.

• The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord) presents Comedy Out of the ’Box on Thursdays, June 24, July 29 and Aug. 26, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for members, seniors and students, and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

• The Palace Teen Company will perform Pippin on Friday, June 25, and Saturday, June 26, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $12 for children and $15 for adults. Visit palacetheatre.org.

• The Kids Coop Theatre performs Bring It On on Friday, June 25, and Saturday, June 26. More info is TBA. Visit kids-coop-theatre.org.

• The Movement Box Dance Studio performs its recital “Movement in Motion” at the Capitol Center for the Arts (44 S. Main St., Concord) on Saturday, June 26, at 1 p.m. Tickets cost $30. Visit ccanh.com.

•​ The Winnipesaukee Playhouse (33 Footlight Circle, Meredith) presents Sleuth June 30 through July 17, with showtimes Tuesday through Saturday at 7:30 p.m., plus matinees on Tuesday, July 6, and Thursday, July 8, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20 to $37. Visit winnipesaukeeplayhouse.org.

•​ The Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) presents its Mad Haus series on Wednesdays, June 30 and Aug. 18, at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $15. The show is also available to livestream. Visit seacoastrep.org.

•​ The Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) presents its Rep Company Cabaret on Sunday, July 4, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $15. The show is also available to livestream. Visit seacoastrep.org.

• The 2021 Bank of New Hampshire Children’s Summer Series presents Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) Tuesday, July 6, through Thursday, July 8, at 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tickets cost $10. Visit palacetheatre.org.

You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown will be at the Prescott Park Arts Festival (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth) July 9 through Aug. 15, with shows daily at 7 p.m. More information is TBA. Visit prescottpark.org.

• The 2021 Bank of New Hampshire Children’s Summer Series presents Peter Pan at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) Tuesday, July 13, through Thursday, July 15, at 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tickets cost $10. Visit palacetheatre.org.

•​ The Winnipesaukee Playhouse (33 Footlight Circle, Meredith) presents Dani Girl outdoors July 14 through July 31, with showtimes Tuesday through Saturday, at 4 p.m. Tickets cost $29 to $39. Visit winnipesaukeeplayhouse.org.

•​ The Majestic Theatre presents’Til Beth Do Us Part at the Majestic Studio Theatre (880 Page St., Manchester) July 16 through July 25, with showtimes on Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. The show is also available to livestream. Visit majestictheatre.net

• The 2021 Bank of New Hampshire Children’s Summer Series presents Wizard of Oz at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) Tuesday, July 20, through Thursday, July 22, at 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tickets cost $10. Visit palacetheatre.org.

•​ Cabaret will be at the Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) July 22 through Sept. 5, with showtimes on Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m., and Sunday at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $32 to $50. Visit seacoastrep.org.

• Tap dancer, teacher and choreographer Aaron Tolson presents an evening of music and dance at the Dana Center (Saint Anselm College, 100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester) on Friday, July 23, at 7:30 p.m., and Saturday, July 24, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $40. Visit anselm.edu/dana-center-humanities.

• New World Theatre’s series of readings and workshop productions “Putting It Together” presents A Series of Inelastic Collisionsby Eugenie Carabatsosat the Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord) on Sunday, July 25, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for members, seniors and students, and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

• The 2021 Bank of New Hampshire Children’s Summer Series presents The Little Mermaid at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) Tuesday, July 27, through Thursday, July 29, at 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tickets cost $10. Visit palacetheatre.org.

•​ The Winnipesaukee Playhouse (33 Footlight Circle, Meredith) presents Tell Me On a Sunday July 28 through Aug. 14, with showtimes Tuesday through Saturday, at 7:30 p.m., plus matinees on Tuesday, Aug. 3, and Thursday, Aug. 5, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20 to $39. Visit winnipesaukeeplayhouse.org.

• The 2021 Bank of New Hampshire Children’s Summer Series presents Beauty and the Beast at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) Tuesday, Aug. 3, through Thursday, Aug. 5, at 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tickets cost $10. Visit palacetheatre.org.

• The Peterborough Players (55 Hadley Road, Peterborough) perform Our Town Aug. 4 through Aug. 15outdoors in downtown Peterborough. Tickets go on sale July 16. Visit peterboroughplayers.org.

• The 2021 Bank of New Hampshire Children’s Summer Series presents Rapunzel at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) Tuesday, Aug. 10, through Thursday, Aug. 12, at 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tickets cost $10. Visit palacetheatre.org.

• The 2021 Bank of New Hampshire Children’s Summer Series presents Cinderella at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) Tuesday, Aug. 17, through Thursday, Aug. 19, at 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tickets cost $10. Visit palacetheatre.org.

• The Peterborough Players (55 Hadley Road, Peterborough) perform Beehive: The 60s Musical at the new outdoor Elsewhere Stage at the Players Aug. 18 through Aug. 29. Tickets go on sale July 16. Visit peterboroughplayers.org.

•​ The Winnipesaukee Playhouse (33 Footlight Circle, Meredith) presents Hooligans and Convicts Aug. 18 through Sept. 4, with showtimes Tuesday through Saturday, at 7:30 p.m., plus matinees on Tuesday, Aug. 24, and Thursday, Aug. 26, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20 to $39. Visit winnipesaukeeplayhouse.org.

• The 2021 Bank of New Hampshire Children’s Summer Series presents Sleeping Beauty at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) Tuesday, Aug. 24, through Thursday, Aug. 26, at 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tickets cost $10. Visit palacetheatre.org.

• The Peterborough Players (55 Hadley Road, Peterborough) perform Where You Are at the new outdoor Elsewhere Stage at the Players Sept. 1 through Sept. 12. Tickets go on sale July 16. Visit peterboroughplayers.org.

•​ The Winnipesaukee Playhouse (33 Footlight Circle, Meredith) presents It Had To Be Yououtdoors Sept. 1 through Sept. 18, with showtimes Tuesday through Saturday at 4 p.m., plus matinees on Saturdays, Sept. 11 and Sept. 18, at 11 a.m. Tickets cost $20 to $37. Visit winnipesaukeeplayhouse.org.

•​ Jekyll & Hyde – The Musical will be at the Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) Sept. 16 through Nov. 6, with showtimes on Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m., and Sunday at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $32 to $50. The show is also available to livestream. Visit seacoastrep.org.

•​ The Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) presents Honey Punch ‘n’ Pals on Saturday, Sept. 18, at 11 a.m. Tickets cost $10. The show is also available to livestream. Visit seacoastrep.org.

•​ The Winnipesaukee Playhouse (33 Footlight Circle, Meredith) presents Glorious Sept. 22 through Oct. 9, with showtimes Tuesday through Saturday at 7:30 p.m., plus matinees on Tuesday, Sept. 28, and Thursday, Sept. 30, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20 to $37. Visit winnipesaukeeplayhouse.org.

Arts

Get reconnected with the New Hampshire arts scene at these exhibitions and special events, where you can talk with local artists and browse and buy all kinds of art.

Exhibits

•​ “Alnôbak Moskijik Maahlakwsikok: Abenaki People Emerging from Ashes,” an art show and sale presented by Two Villages Art Society, Abenaki Trails Project and Vermont Abenaki Artists Association, is on view now through Friday, May 28, at the Two Villages gallery (846 Main St., Contoocook). It features traditional and contemporary art created by tribal members of the Abenaki people and their community partners, including beading, pottery, birch bark building, fabric art, basketry, printmaking, painting, jewelry, painted gourds and leather work. Gallery hours are 1 to 5 p.m. Visit twovillagesart.org.

• The New Hampshire Art Association presents its 35th annual Omer T. Lassonde exhibition now through May 30 at the NHAA’s Robert Lincoln Levy Gallery (136 State St., Portsmouth) and online, featuring works in a variety of media by NHAA members and non-members centered around this year’s theme, “Beyond the Boundaries.” Gallery hours are Monday by appointment; Tuesday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Visit nhartassociation.org.

• The Seacoast Artist Association (130 Water St., Exeter) has an exhibit featuring oils by Jim Ryan and watercolors by Lorraine Makhoul on view through May. Visit seacoastartist.org.

• Twiggs Gallery (254 King St., Boscawen) presents an exhibit, “Retablos Reconsidered,” now through June 6, featuring works by 12 artists inspired by retablos, the honorific art form of devotional paintings that relate to miraculous events. Gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com.

• “Geometric Abstraction through Cut and Paste,” featuring the works of Meri Goyette, is on display in the windows and lobby of the Nashua Telegraph offices (110 Main St., Suite 1, Nashua) now through June 11. Goyette, 95, has been a longtime supporter and patron of the local arts, but has never publicly shown her own work until now. The exhibition will include statement collages and collectible greeting cards that she crafted from paper, fabric and glue during the pandemic. Visit cityartsnashua.org.

• The New Hampshire Art Association has an exhibition, “Transformations: Nature and Beyond,” featuring the work of digital artist William Townsend, on view at the gallery in the Concord Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center (49 S. Main St.) now through June 17. Townsend uses digital tools and techniques to alter line, form and color in photographs of natural objects, such as trees in a forest or seaweed on a beach. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit nhartassociation.org.

• The New Hampshire Antique Co-op (323 Elm St., Milford) has an exhibit “Fresh Perspectives: Works by New Hampshire artists Peter Milton, ​Varujan Boghosian, Robert Hughes & More,” on view in the Co-op’s Tower Gallery now through Aug. 31. Visit nhantiquecoop.com.

• The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester) has an exhibition, “The Body in Art: From the Spiritual to the Sensual,” on view now through Sept. 1, that provides a look at how artists through the ages have used the human body as a means of creative expression. Tickets cost $15, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, and must be booked online. Museum hours are Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. (free after 5 p.m.); and Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with the hour of 10 to 11 a.m. currently reserved for seniors and museum members. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

• The Seacoast African American Cultural Center (located inside the Portsmouth Historical Society, 10 Middle St., Portsmouth) has an exhibit, “Fashion Forward: Africana Style,” on view now through Sept. 1, showcasing Black fashion and exploring connections between African American and African design aesthetics from past to present. Gallery hours are Monday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; visitors must reserve a 45-minute time slot in advance. Walk-in guests will be accommodated as space permits. Tickets cost $10 for the general public and $5 for Historical Society members and are available through eventbrite.com. Visit saacc-nh.org.

• The Portsmouth Historical Society (10 Middle St., Portsmouth) has an exhibit, “Don Gorvett: Working Waterfronts,” on view now through Sept. 12, featuring more than 60 works by the contemporary Seacoast printmaker. Gallery hours are daily, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission costs $7.50 for adults and is free for kids under age 18, seniors age 70 and older and active and retired military. Admission is free for all on the first Friday of every month. Visit portsmouthhistory.org.

• “Twilight of American Impressionism” is on view now through Sept. 12 at the Portsmouth Historical Society (10 Middle St., Portsmouth). The exhibit showcases New England painters and masters of impressionism Alice Ruggles Sohier and Frederick A. Bosley. Gallery hours are daily, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission costs $7.50 for adults and is free for kids under age 18, seniors age 70 and older and active and retired military. Admission is free for all on the first Friday of every month. Visit portsmouthhistory.org.

• The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester) has an exhibition, “Critical Cartography: Larissa Fassler in Manchester,” on view now through the fall, featuring immersive large-scale drawings that reflect the Berlin-based artist’s observations of downtown Manchester while she was an artist-in-residence at the Currier Museum in 2019. Museum hours are Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. (free after 5 p.m.); and Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with the hour of 10 to 11 a.m. currently reserved for seniors and museum members. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

• An exhibit celebrating the life and legacy of illustrator Tomie dePaola is on view now at the Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). It features a collection of dePaola’s original drawings. Tickets cost $15, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, and must be booked online. Museum hours are Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. (free after 5 p.m.); and Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with the hour of 10 to 11 a.m. currently reserved for seniors and museum members. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

• The Seacoast Artist Association (130 Water St., Exeter) will have an exhibit featuring works by painter Janice Leahy and photographer Dave Saums on view during June. Visit seacoastartist.org.

• The New Hampshire Society of Photographic Artists’ 21st annual exhibit will be on display at the Kimball Jenkins Estate (266 N. Main St., Concord) during June. Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Visit kimballjenkins.com.

• The City of Concord and the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce host the fourth annual Art on Main, a year-round outdoor public art exhibit set up in Concord’s downtown opening. It will be installed in June. Visit concordnhchamber.com/creativeconcord.

• The New Hampshire Art Association presents “Transformations,” featuring the work of painters Barbara Stevens Adams and Catherine DiPentima, June 3 through June 27, at the NHAA’s Robert Lincoln Levy Gallery (136 State St., Portsmouth) and online. Gallery hours are Monday by appointment; Tuesday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. Visit nhartassociation.org.

• The Surface Design Association’s (SDA) New Hampshire Group brings an exhibit, “Tension: Process in the Making,” to Twiggs Gallery (254 King St., Boscawen) July 24 through Sept. 4. It features fiber art and textiles by New Hampshire artists. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com.

• Concord artist and gallery owner Jess Barnet will host her first group art exhibit, “Summer Haze,” at her gallery (located in the Patriot Investment building, 4 Park St., Suite 216, Concord) Aug. 6 through Sept. 3. Visit jessbarnett.com.

Events

• The 14th annual Nashua International Sculpture Symposium is going on now through Saturday, June 12. The public is invited to watch three sculptors as they create outdoor sculptures for permanent installation in the city. The sculptors are working outside The Picker Artists studios (3 Pine St., Nashua) Monday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., now through Friday, June 4. They will relocate to the sculpture installation site on Saturday, June 5, where they will continue their work until the closing ceremony on Saturday, June 12. Visit nashuasculpturesymposium.org.

• The ​Concord Arts Market, an outdoor artisan and fine art market, is on Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., June through September, at Rollins Park (33 Bow St., Concord). Visit concordartsmarket.net.

• Kelley Stelling Contemporary in Manchester hosts “Fired Up! Outdoor Ceramics Show and Kiln Opening” on Saturday, June 19, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the studio of NH Potters Guild artist Al Jaeger (12 Perry Road, Deerfield). Visit kelleystellingcontemporary.com.

• The Craftsmen’s Fair, a nine-day craft fair featuring work by hundreds of juried League of NH Craftsmen members, takes place Saturday, Aug. 7, through Sunday, Aug. 15, at Mount Sunapee Resort (1398 Route 103, Newbury). More information is TBA. Visit nhcrafts.org.

• The Greeley Park Art Show (100 Concord St., Nashua) will be held on Saturday, Aug. 21, and Sunday, Aug. 22, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The annual outdoor juried art show hosted by Nashua Area Artists Association features a variety of artwork for sale. Visit nashuaareaartistsassoc.org.

Nature

Experience New Hampshire’s natural side with these hikes, educational programs and more.

• Beaver Brook Association (117 Ridge Road, Hollis) is offering a session of guided morning hikes every Friday at 9 a.m., now through July 9. The hikes are 3 to 4 miles long. The cost is $50 for the rest of the session. Visit beaverbrook.org.

• Join NH Audubon president Doug Bechtel for a casual one-hour bird walk every Saturday at 8 a.m. The location alternates each week between the Massabesic Audubon Center (26 Deerneck Road, Auburn) and McLane Audubon Center (84 Silk Farm Road, Concord); the next walk, on Saturday, May 29, is at the Massabesic Audubon Center. The walks are free, and no registration is required. Visit nhaudubon.org.

Wildflower Walks continue at Beaver Brook Association (117 Ridge Road, Hollis) on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., now through June 16. Learn about the natural history and various uses of wildflowers as they bloom. Visit beaverbrook.org.

• Join Seacoast Science Center (570 Ocean Blvd., Rye) for a weeklong celebration of World Ocean Day from Tuesday, June, 1, through Tuesday, June 8. There will be a variety of virtual and in-person events, including beach cleanup days, educational programs about marine life, a recycled arts contest, a virtual 5K run, tide pool explorations, trivia challenges and more. Visit seacoastsciencecenter.org/events/world-ocean-day-weeklong-virtual-celebration for the full schedule and to register for events.

• Saturday, June 5, is New Hampshire Fish and Game’s Free Fishing Day, when state residents and nonresidents are allowed to fish any inland water or saltwater in New Hampshire without a fishing license. Visit wildlife.state.nh.us.

• The New Hampshire Herbal Network will host its annual Herb & Garden Day on Saturday, June 5, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum (18 Highlawn Road, Warner). The event will include workshops, plant and tree identification walks, grid work demonstrations, children’s activities, an herbal market and plant sale, local food vendors, raffles and more. Admission costs $25. Visit nhherbalnetwork.wordpress.com/herbday.

• Squam Lakes Natural Science Center (534 Route 3, Holderness) has its annual Breeding Bird Census on Saturday, June 5. The public is invited to listen for and document the territorial songs of male birds, which indicate probable nesting. The early session, from 5:30 to 8 a.m., will cover two forested zones including Mt. Fayal while the later session, from 8 to 9:30 a.m., will cover fields, exhibit areas and Kirkwood Gardens. There is no cost to participate, but registration is required. Visit nhnature.org.

• Unwind in nature with Yoga in the Gardens at the Beaver Brook Association’s Maple Hill Gardens (117 Ridge Road, Hollis) on Tuesdays, June 8 through June 29, at 4 p.m., and on Fridays, June 25, July 30 and Aug. 27, at 6 p.m. The cost is $15. Visit beaverbrook.org.

• Prescott Farm Environmental Education Center (928 White Oaks Road, Laconia) hosts a series of guided hikes this summer, including a naturalist-led wildlife hike on Saturday, June 12, at 10 a.m., for $12, and Saturday, Aug. 7, at 5 a.m., for $15; a summer solstice sunrise hike on Sunday, June 20, at 5 a.m., for $15; a woods walk with a herbalist on Saturdays, June 26 and Sept. 4, at 9 a.m., for $27; a wild mushroom walk on Saturdays, Aug. 21 and Sept. 18, at 10 a.m., for $30; and a full moon hike on Monday, Sept. 20, at 6:30 p.m., for $15. Visit prescottfarm.org.

• Beaver Brook Association (117 Ridge Road, Hollis) hosts a fern walk through the woods on Tuesday, June 15, at 10 a.m. See more than a dozen different species of ferns within a half-mile walk and learn how to tell them apart. The cost is $15. Visit beaverbrook.org.

• The 9th annual Monarch Festival at Petals in the Pines Nature Explore Outdoor Classroom (126 Baptist Road, Canterbury) will be held on Saturday, Sept. 11. The event is focused on educating the public on what they can do in their own backyards to help monarchs thrive. There will be butterfly-themed activities for kids and adults. More information is TBA. Visit petalsinthepines.com.

Free Concerts

Bring a blanket or lawn chair and enjoy free live music at these outdoor summer concert series, featuring local and regional acts of all genres.

• The Family Concerts in the Park series in Bedford will be held Wednesdays at 6 p.m., from July 7 through Aug. 11, at the Village Common Park Gazebo (Bell Hill Road). Visit bedfordreconline.com.

• The Smyth Public Library Summer Music Series is held at the Candia Pond Park gazebo (behind the library, 55 High St.) every Wednesday, June 30 through Aug. 11, at 6:30 p.m. Visit smythpl.org/music-series.

Concord Public Library presents its Live Music with the Library series, with shows on Wednesdays, June 16 at 6:30 p.m., at Keach Park (off Loudon Road), July 21 at 6 p.m., at Eagle Square, and Aug. 18 at 6 p.m., at the library (45 Green St.). Visit concordpubliclibrary.net.

Exeter’s Summer Concert in the Park Series will feature music every Thursday from 6 to 8 p.m., at Swasey Parkway (316 Water St.). Visit exeternh.gov.

• The Hampstead Cable Television Summer Concert Series presents live music in Hampstead on Tuesdays, July 6 through Aug. 24, at 6 p.m. at Meetinghouse Park (11 Main St.), and on Wednesdays, July 7 through July 28, at 6 p.m. at Ordway Park (Main Street). Visit hampsteadconcerts.com/concert-series.

Hampton Beach Sea Shell Stage Series brings music to Ocean Boulevard nightly, June 11 through Sept. 6, starting at 7 p.m. Visit hamptonbeach.org/events/seashell-stage-nightly-shows.

• The Henniker Summer Concert Series presents live music every Tuesday, June 15 through Aug. 31, at 6:30 p.m. at the Angela Robinson Bandstand in Community Park (57 Main St.). Visit henniker.org.

• The Londonderry Arts Council hosts Concerts on the Common in Londonderry (265 Mammoth Road) on Wednesdays, Aug. 4 through Aug. 25, at 7 p.m., and Saturdays, Sept. 4 and Sept. 11, at 5 p.m. Visit londonderryartscouncil.org/cotc-schedule.

• The Summer Concert Series at Stark Park in Manchester (89 Park Ave.) returns, with music on Sundays, July 11 through Aug. 8, and Aug. 29, at 2 p.m., and on Thursday, July 29, at 6 p.m. Visit friendsofstarkpark.org.

Merrimack’s Summer Concert Series returns to Abbie Griffin Park (6 Baboosic Lake Road), with live music every Wednesday, June 23 through Aug. 11, at 6 p.m. Visit merrimackparksandrec.org/summer-concert-series.

Milford hosts a Summer Concert Series in Emerson Park (off Route 13) on Wednesdays, June 30 through July 21, at 7 p.m. Visit milford.nh.gov.

• The Nashua SummerFun series hosts live music on Tuesdays, June 8 through Sept. 7, at 7 p.m. at the Greeley Park Bandshell (100 Concord St.). Visit nashuanh.gov/546/summer-fun.

New Boston’s Concerts on the Common (7 Meetinghouse Hill Road) will return with live music on select Tuesdays evenings, June through August. A schedule is TBA. Visit newbostonnh.gov/recreation/pages/concert-common.

Newmarket’s Summer Concert Series will return this summer, with a schedule TBA. Visit newmarketrec.org/summer-concert-series.

Pelham’s Concerts on the Village Green (in front of the Pelham Public Library, 24 Village Green) will take place every other Wednesday, June 23 through Aug. 18, at 6 p.m. Visit pelhamcommunityspirit.org/sponsored-events/concerts-on-the-village-green.

Plaistow’s Summer Concert Series will present live music every Wednesday, June 23 through Aug. 25, at 6 p.m. at the PARC (51 Old Country Road). Visit plaistow.com/recreation.

• Pro Portsmouth’s Summer in the Street brings live music and performances to Pleasant Street in downtown Portsmouth on Saturday evenings, July 10 through July 31. More information is TBA. Visit proportsmouth.org.

• The Summer Concert Series at Field of Dreams Community Park in Salem (48 Geremonty Drive) will return this summer, with a schedule TBA on its website. Visit fieldofdreamsnh.org.

Live Music

May

• Country singer-songwriter Jake Owen will take the stage at Northlands Live on Friday, May 28, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $139 for a pod of up to five seats.

• See Elton John tribute act Captain Fantastic at the Tupelo Drive-In on Friday, May 28, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

• The Tupelo Drive-In will host The Jon Butcher Axis on Saturday, May 29, at 4 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

Aaron Lewis of Staind will perform at Northlands Live on Saturday, May 29, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $129 for a pod of up to five seats.

Jake Owen will also perform at The Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion on Saturday, May 29, at 6 p.m. Tickets start at $65.

• See Kate Redgate outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Saturday, May 29, at either 6 p.m. or 8 p.m. Tickets start at $60 per table (two-person limit).

• The Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion will host Titans of ’80s Rock, a tribute festival to storied rock bands of the 1980s, on Sunday, May 30, at noon. Tickets start at $22.50.

• The Tupelo Drive-In will present Gary Hoey on Sunday, May 30, at 1 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

June

Erin McKeown will hold two performances outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Friday, June 4, at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets start at $60 per table (two-person limit).

• Six-piece group Fortune will hold a performance at the Tupelo Drive-In on Friday, June 4, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

• Pink Floyd tribute act The Machine will be at Northlands Live on Friday, June 4, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $99 for a pod of up to five seats.

• See Badfish: A Tribute to Sublime at Northlands Live on Saturday, June 5, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $99 for a pod of up to five seats.

Grace Potter will take the stage at the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion on Saturday, June 5, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $29.

• The Tupelo Drive-In will present Classic Stones Live on Saturday, June 5, for two shows at 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

Joe Sabourin will perform at Fletcher-Murphy Park on Sunday, June 6, at 3 p.m. Tickets are $12, plus a $3 fee.

Marble Eyes will perform two shows outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Sunday, June 6, at 3:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets start at $70 per table (two-person limit).

• Blues rocker Popa Chubby will take the stage at the Tupelo Drive-In on Friday, June 11, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

• See Son Little at the Historic Music Hall for two shows on Friday, June 11, at 5:30 p.m. or 8 p.m. Tickets range from $25 to $60.

Jay Psaros and Jason Spooner will perform at The Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Saturday, June 12, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25.

• See the Indigo Girls at Northlands Live on Saturday, June 12, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $149 for a pod of up to five seats.

The British Invasion Years will be at the Tupelo Drive-In for two shows on Saturday, June 12, at 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

• See the No Shoes Nation Band, a tribute to country legend Kenny Chesney, at the Rex Theatre on Saturday, June 12, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance or $25 at the door.

Jason Spooner will be at Fletcher-Murphy Park on Sunday, June 13, at 3 p.m. Tickets are $12, plus a $3 fee.

Johnny A. will perform two shows at the Tupelo Drive-In on Sunday, June 13, at 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

• See singer-guitarist Dwayne Higgins outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Thursday, June 17, for two shows at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets start at $60 per table (two-person limit).

• Don’t miss A Joyful Juneteenth Celebration with N’Kenge at the Historic Music Hall on Friday, June 18, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $35.

Captain Fantastic returns to the Tupelo Drive-In on Friday, June 18, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

• The Allman Betts Band will be at Northlands Live on Friday, June 18, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $119 for a pod of up to five seats.

• The Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion will host two shows featuring Greensky Bluegrass on Friday, June 18, and Saturday, June 19, with doors opening at 6 p.m. on both days. Tickets start at $39.

• See Billy Joel tribute act The Uptown Boys at the Palace Theatre on either Saturday, June 19, or Sunday, June 20, with doors opening at 2 p.m. on both days. Tickets range from $39 to $49.

American Elton, a tribute to rock legend Elton John, will be at the Rex Theatre on Saturday, June 19, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25.

• See Kip Moore with special guest Ayla Brown at Northlands Live on Saturday, June 19, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $129 for a pod of up to five seats.

• See the Laurel Canyon Band at the Tupelo Drive-In on Saturday, June 19, at 4 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

Boat House Row will perform two shows at the Tupelo Drive-In on Sunday, June 20, at 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

Ms. Yamica Peterson will perform at Fletcher-Murphy Park on Sunday, June 20, at 3 p.m. Tickets are $12, plus a $3 fee.

• See Midnight North outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Sunday, June 20, at either 5 p.m. or 7 p.m. Tickets start at $60 for a small table (two-person limit).

Crys Matthews will perform outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Tuesday, June 22, at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets start at $60 for a small table (two-person limit).

• Country singer Brantley Gilbert will perform two shows at the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion on Friday, June 25, and Saturday, June 26, with doors opening at 5 p.m. on both days. Tickets start at $29.

Classic Stones Live will be at The Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Friday, June 25, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $29.

• The Tupelo Drive-In will present the James Montgomery Band on Friday, June 25, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

• Pop sensation Tiffany will perform two shows at the Tupelo Drive-In on Saturday, June 26, at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

Panorama: A Tribute to The Cars, will be at the Rex Theatre on Saturday, June 26, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 in advance and $29 at the door.

Recycled Percussion will take the stage at Northlands Live on Saturday, June 26, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $99 for a pod of up to five seats.

Mullett will perform two shows at the Tupelo Drive-In on Sunday, June 27, at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

• See local group Bitter Pill outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Sunday, June 27, at 5 p.m. or 7 p.m. Tickets start at $60 for a small table (two-person limit).

July

Foreigners Journey will perform at The Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Friday, July 2, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $29.

Badfish: A Tribute to Sublime will take the stage at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Friday, July 2, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25 in advance or $30 at the door.

• See New York City-based quartet Howard outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Friday, July 2, at 6 p.m. or 8 p.m. Tickets start at $60 for a small table (two-person limit).

• The Tupelo Drive-In will present Don White on Friday, July 2, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

Eaglemania, a nationally touring tribute to rock legends the Eagles, will perform two shows at the Tupelo Drive-In on Saturday, July 3, at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

• See Moe at Northlands Live on Saturday, July 3, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $139 for a pod of up to five seats.

• The Soul Rebel Project will perform two shows outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Saturday, July 3, at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets start at $60 for a small table (two-person limit).

Old Dominion will take the stage at the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion for two shows, on Sunday, July 4, and Monday, July 5, with doors opening at 5 p.m. Tickets start at $35.

• Maine-based indie duo the Oshima Brothers will perform two outdoor shows at the Historic Music Hall on Thursday, July 8, at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets start at $70 for a small table (two-person limit).

Chris Janson is set to perform at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Thursday, July 8, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $36 in advance and $41 at the door.

• See the Old Crow Medicine Show at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Friday, July 9, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $40 in advance or $45 at the door.

• The Adam Ezra Group will be at the Tupelo Drive-In for two shows on Saturday, July 10, at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

Liz & Dan Faiella will be at Fletcher-Murphy Park on Saturday, July 10, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $12, plus a $3 fee.
• Eagles tribute act Dark Desert Eagles will be at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Saturday, July 10, at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $21.

• The Rex Theatre will host An Evening with The Spain Brothers on Saturday, July 10, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $20.

• See The Marshall Tucker Band at Northlands Live on Saturday, July 10, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $99 for a pod of up to two seats.

• The nine-piece Scott Spradling Band will perform at the Palace Theatre on Saturday, July 10, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $20.

• The Tupelo Drive-In will present The Weight Band for two shows on Sunday, July 11, at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

• The Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom will host the Little River Band on Thursday, July 15, at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $25.

• Toronto-based rock group Enter the Haggis will take the stage at the Tupelo Drive-In on Thursday, July 15, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

The Breakers, a tribute act to rock legend Tom Petty, will be at the Tupelo Drive-In on Friday, July 16, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

Scott Solsky will hold an album release party at the Bank of New Hampshire Stage on Friday, July 16, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 ($10 tickets are available for a livestream).

• The Tedeschi Trucks band will perform two shows at the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion on Friday, July 16, and Saturday, July 17, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m. on both days. Tickets start at $35.

• Grammy Award-winning act Asleep at the Wheel will perform at The Flying Monkey on Friday, July 16, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $39.

Pigeons Playing Ping Pong will be at Northlands Live on Friday, July 16, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $119 for a pod of up to five seats.

• Internationally touring singer-songwriter Matt Nakoa will be outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Friday, July 16, at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets start at $70 for a small table (two-person limit).

Seth Glier will be at Fletcher-Murphy Park on Saturday, July 17, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $12, plus a $3 fee.

• See David Clark at the Rex Theatre on Saturday, July 17, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $29.

• Singer-songwriter Kasim Sulton will be at the Tupelo Drive-In on Saturday, July 17, at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

• Beatles tribute act The Weeklings will perform at the Tupelo Drive-In on Sunday, July 18, at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

Buddy Guy will take the stage at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Sunday, July 18, at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $31.

• See David Wilcox outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Tuesday, July 20, at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets start at $70 for a small table (two-person limit).

• Brooklyn-based five-piece group The Rad Trads will be outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Thursday, July 22, at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets start at $60 for a small table (two-person limit).

Aaron Lewis of Staind will play two shows at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Thursday, July 22, and Friday, July 23, with doors opening at 7 p.m. on both days. Tickets are $39 in advance or $44 at the door.

• James Taylor tribute act JT Express will perform at the Tupelo Drive-In on Friday, July 23, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

• The Bank of New Hampshire Stage will host Into the Mystic: The Van Morrison Experience on Saturday, July 24, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $30.

Damn the Torpedoes, a tribute to Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers, will be at The Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Saturday, July 24, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $19.

The Black Crowes will play their acclaimed 1990 debut album Shake Your Money Maker front to back at the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion on Saturday, July 24, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $29.

• The Tupelo Drive-In presents Saving Abel on Saturday, July 24, at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

Voyage, a Journey tribute band, will be at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Saturday, July 24, at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $19.

Pink Talking Fish, a hybrid act paying tribute to rock bands Pink Floyd, Talking Heads and Phish, will be at The Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Sunday, July 25, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $26.

• See Michael Ray at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Sunday, July 25, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door.

• The Kenny Brothers Band will be outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Wednesday, July 28, at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets start at $60 for a small table (two-person limit).

Chris Stapleton has a show at the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion on Wednesday, July 28, at 7 p.m. with tickets still available, starting at $99.75.

The Fab Four: The Ultimate Beatles Tribute will be at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Friday, July 30, at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $21.

Tapestry: The Carole King Songbook will be at The Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Friday, July 30, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $29.

• The Tupelo Drive-In presents Jonathan Edwards on Friday, July 30, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

• See Led Zeppelin tribute act Get the Led Out at Northlands Live on Saturday, July 31, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $89.30 for a pod of up to two seats.

Lucas Gallo will be at Fletcher-Murphy Park on Saturday, July 31, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $12, plus a $3 fee.

• L.A.-based singer-songwriter Brad Byrd will be outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Saturday, July 31, at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets start at $60 for a small table (two-person limit).

August

• Colorado singer-songwriter Daniel Rodriguez will be outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Sunday, Aug. 1, at 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets start at $70 for a small table (two-person limit).

Justin Moore will be at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Friday, Aug. 6, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $47 in advance and $52 at the door.

• Country juggernaut Luke Bryan will perform two shows at the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion on Friday, Aug. 6, and Saturday, Aug. 7, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m. both days. Tickets start at $88.75.

• See Katie Dobbins at Fletcher-Murphy Park on Saturday, Aug. 7, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $12, plus a $3 fee.

Alice Howe with Freebo will be outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Saturday, Aug. 7, at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets start at $70 for a small table (two person limit).

• Heart tribute act Crazy on You will be at the Tupelo Drive-In on Saturday, Aug. 7, at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

• See KT Tunstall at the Tupelo Drive-In on Sunday, Aug. 8, at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

• See Darryl Hall & John Oates at the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion on Monday, Aug. 9, at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $31.50.

TEOA will be outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Wednesday, Aug. 11, at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets start at $60 for a small table (two-person limit).

• Pay tribute to rock icon Freddie Mercury with One Night of Queen, which will be at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Wednesday, Aug. 11, and Thursday, Aug. 12, at 8 p.m. both nights. Tickets start at $21.

Tower of Power will be at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Friday, Aug. 13, at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $21.

• See Greg Hawkes of The Cars, with Eddie Japan at the Tupelo Drive-In on Friday, Aug. 13, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

Blues Traveler will take the stage at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Saturday, Aug. 14, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $37 in advance and $42 at the door.

• See Bill Wylder outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Saturday, Aug. 14, at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets start at $60 for a small table (two-person limit).

America is making a stop at Northlands Live on Saturday, Aug. 14, at 6:30 p.m. as part of its 50th anniversary tour. Tickets start at $55.50 for general admission.

Herman’s Hermits will be at The Flying Monkey on Sunday, Aug. 15, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $69.

Deb Talan of The Weepies will be outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Sunday, Aug. 15, at 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets start at $70 for a small table (two-person limit).

• See Cherry Cherry, a tribute to Neil Diamond, at the Tupelo Drive-In on Sunday, Aug. 15, at 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Tickets are $75 per vehicle (one ticket per vehicle).

• The Miguel Zenon Quartet will be outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Tuesday, Aug. 17, at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets start at $80 for a small table (two person limit).

Chris Lane takes the stage at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Thursday, Aug. 19, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door.

AJ Lee and Blue Summit will be outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Thursday, Aug. 19, at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets are $60 for a small table (two-person limit).

Three Dog Night will be at the Tupelo Music Hall on Friday, Aug. 20, at 8 p.m., the first Tupelo show back indoors at full capacity. Tickets start at $70.

• See the Mt. Pleasant Band at Fletcher-Murphy Park on Saturday, Aug. 21, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $12, plus a $3 fee.

Little Big Town will be at the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion on Saturday, Aug. 21, at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $29.

Kenny Wayne Shepherd will be at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Saturday, Aug. 21, at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $25.

• See Elektric Voodoo at the Tupelo Music Hall on Sunday, Aug. 22, at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $85.

• The Dave Matthews Band will perform two shows at the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion on Tuesday, Aug. 24, and Wednesday, Aug. 25, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m. Tickets start at $45.50.

• See River Sister outdoors at the Historic Music Hall on Friday, Aug. 27, at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets start at $60 for a small table (two-person limit).

• Country star Darius Rucker will be at the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion on Friday, Aug. 27, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $29.

Eaglemania, a tribute to the Eagles, will be at The Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Saturday, Aug. 28, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $29.

Get the Led Out, a tribute to rock icons Led Zeppelin, will be at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Saturday, Aug. 28, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $29 in advance and $34 at the door.

High Noon, a tribute to Lynyrd Skynyrd, will take the stage at the Rex Theatre on Saturday, Aug. 28, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $29.

• See The Honey Bees at Fletcher-Murphy Park on Sunday, Aug. 29, at 3 p.m. Tickets are $12, plus a $3 fee.

• 1990s rockers Collective Soul will perform with Tonic and Better Than Ezra at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Sunday, Aug. 29, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $65 in advance and $70 at the door.

• See Lee Brice at Northlands Live on Sunday, Aug. 29, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $149 for a pod of up to five seats.

September

Melissa Etheridge will be at the Historic Music Hall on Wednesday, Sept. 1, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $55.

Alanis Morrissette performs with Garbage and Liz Phair at the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion on Friday, Sept. 3, at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $66.

• See 33⅓ Live’s Killer Queen Experience at the Tupelo Music Hall on Friday, Sept. 3, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $35.

Toby Keith will be at the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion on Saturday, Sept. 4, at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $36.25.

Live Music Venues

  • Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion, 72 Meadowbrook Lane, Gilford, 293-4700, meadowbrook.net
  • Bank of New Hampshire Stage, 16 S. Main St., Concord, 225-1111, ccanh.com
  • Capitol Center for the Arts, 44 S. Main St., Concord, 225-1111, ccanh.com
  • Fletcher-Murphy Park, 28 Fayette St., Concord, 225-1111, ccanh.com
  • The Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center, 39 S. Main St., Plymouth, 536-2551, flyingmonkeynh.com
  • Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom, 169 Ocean Boulevard, Hampton Beach, 929-4100, casinoballroom.com
  • Historic Music Hall, 28 Chestnut St., Portsmouth, 436-2400, themusichall.org
  • Music Hall Loft, 131 Congress St., Portsmouth, 436-2400, themusichall.org
  • Northlands Live, Cheshire Fairground, 247 Monadnock Hwy., Swanzey, northlandslive.com
  • Palace Theatre, 80 Hanover St., Manchester, 668-5588, palacetheatre.org
  • Rex Theatre, 23 Amherst St., Manchester, 668-5588, palacetheatre.org/rex-theatre
  • Tupelo Music Hall/Tupelo Drive-In, 10 A St., Derry, 437-5100, tupelohall.com (on Aug. 20, the Tupelo Music Hall will move all shows indoors at 100 percent capacity)

Featured photo:

Garden Escapes

Get all of the flower-filled beauty with none of the work at public gardens

Plenty of people like working in the garden, planting and pruning and watching things grow. But there’s something to be said about relaxing in a luxurious garden where you don’t have to lift a finger to reap its rewards. Public gardens are the perfect opportunity to enjoy stunning displays of nature, from flowers that are bursting with color to vibrant trees, grasses and water features. So take a break from weeding — or from endlessly watching HGTV in the hopes that you’ll be inspired to do some weeding — and check out some of these public gardens.

Fuller Gardens

10 Willow Ave., North Hampton 964-5414, fullergardens.org

Colorful history: Fuller Gardens is a public, nonprofit botanical garden that dates back to 1927, when Massachusetts Gov. Alvan Fuller commissioned a landscape architect for his summer estate, known as Runnymede-by-the-Sea. In the ’30s, Fuller — also a successful businessman who started the first auto dealership in Boston — hired another firm to improve those gardens and to create a rose garden to honor his wife, Viola. Since then, the garden has expanded even more, with additions like a Japanese garden and a dahlia display garden.

The brains behind the beauty: Jamie Colen has been the garden director at Fuller since 1999, and there’s a staff of seven that works at the gardens seven days a week.

Standout features: Three acres of gardens featuring annuals and perennials, water features, a koi pond, ornamental statuary and more. Fuller is best known for its roses, Colen said, with about 1,700 rose bushes and approximately 125 varieties.

Growing season: At Fuller Gardens, getting the space ready for its busiest time of year starts in February and March, with work in the greenhouse. There are thousands of pots that have to be replanted, and then the crew gets outside to start the maintenance, like making sure the underground irrigation system is working and undoing all of the winterization that they did back in December, like tying the rose bushes and preserving the statuary and other parts of the garden’s hardscape.

“We basically take care of an outdoor museum,” Colen said.

And yes, there’s raking and pruning and weeding, too. What you won’t see, though, is the crew using bark mulch, a staple gardening supply for many home gardeners.

“Bark mulch is really acidic and you’re putting it on plants that like a neutral pH,” Colen said.

Fuller Gardens is also “virtually pesticide-free,” using potassium bicarbonate to keep the roses pest-free. Colen said they make a point of working with nature, not against it.

“We mow three times a week, no chemicals — there’s no magic here,” he said. “We have some clover. It looks great [and] takes a lot of abuse.”

Your garden experience: Because they do succession planting, there’s never a bad time to see the gardens, Colen said.

“It’s a beautiful design because there’s something in bloom all the time,” he said.

The roses start blooming at the end of June and are often still blooming until November, growing as high as 12 feet tall, Colen said.

“The first bloom is probably the biggest, but it’s not the most spectacular,” he said.

Whenever you choose to go, you can walk through the gardens at your leisure.

The details: Fuller Gardens opened for the season on May 10 and will remain open through mid-October, seven days a week, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. The cost of admission is $9 for adults, $8 for seniors, $6 for students with an ID, $4 for kids under 12 and no charge for infants who are carried.

Photos courtesy of Fuller Gardens.

The Fells

456 Route 103A, Newbury 763-4789, thefells.org

Colorful history: The Fells, which encompasses 83 acres of woodlands and grounds and nearly half a mile of undeveloped Lake Sunapee shoreline, is located in Newbury and is the former summer home of American writer and diplomat John M. Hay (1838-1905), who began acquiring abandoned sheep farms in the late 1800s and ultimately owned nearly 1,000 acres of land. His son Clarence inherited the property when John Hay died in 1905, and he and his wife Alice transformed the rock pasture into extensive formal and informal gardens. In 1960 the Hays deeded 675 acres to the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests to protect it from development, and the remainder was deeded to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the ’70s.

The brains behind the beauty: HorticulturistNick Scheu has been the landscape director at The Fells for three seasons and has an assistant and typically two interns in the landscape department.

Standout features: There are eight major gardens at The Fells, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Scheu said The Fells is well known for its rhododendrons, and he particularly likes the heath and the heather, and the “lovely” perennial border that dates back to 1909. There’s also a poetry walk and an ecology trail. On the property this year will be the Art in Nature 2021 Sculpture Exhibit, with pieces that areintegrated into the surrounding landscape and are based on the theme “Stillness & Motion.”

Growing season: Getting the property ready for the spring season starts in mid-March, Scheu said, when they start uncovering winterized plants and pruning the fruit trees and shrubs. Scheu runs pruning workshops throughout the spring, specific to blueberries, apple trees, spring bloomers and more, plus potting workshops that have participants potting seed and planting plugs for both The Fells and their own home gardens.

Your garden experience: Though the landscape will evolve throughout the spring and summer, “We hope we have things in flower pretty much from May to September or November,” Scheu said. Different plants do shine at different times, though, he said, noting that the rhododendron and azaleas are especially nice from mid-May to mid- to late July, while the asters in the fall are on full display and attract hundreds of butterflies.

“Early summer gardens are always a joy to see,” Scheu said. “[They have] really great colors and new growth appearing from Memorial Day to the end of June.”

The Fells offers guided garden tours each day that the Main House is open (see details below), and there’s a free guided hike on the first Thursday of every month. At any time, you can “casually walk the grounds and enjoy whatever is flowering,” Scheu said.

He said there’s often wildlife to see too — he had just left a fox den full of babies, and it’s not unusual to have deer, bear and fisher cats roaming the property.

Scheu suggests that prior to visiting The Fells guests should look at the extensive website, which includes maps of the property, a calendar of events and other useful information that can enhance the experience.

The details: The gardens and trails at The Fells are open daily year-round, and visitors may hike the trails and visit the gardens from dawn until dusk. The Fells’ Main House opens for the season on Saturday, May 29, and will be open on weekends until the summer season begins on June 16, at which point it will be open Wednesdays through Sundays until Sept. 6, when it reverts back to weekends and Monday holidays only, through Columbus Day. The hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. When the Main House is open, the cost of admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and students, $4 for kids 6 to 17, free for kids 5 and under, and $25 for families of two adults and two or more children ages 6 or above. When the Main House is closed, admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and students, $3 for children and $15 for families of two adults and two or more children ages 6 or above. Winter admission, December through March, is $5 per household, payable at the self-serve Welcome Kiosk. Admission is always free for active military members and veterans, and their immediate family.

Forty-minute guided tours of the gardens, included in the cost of admission, are offered Wednesday through Sunday, Memorial Day weekend through Columbus Day weekend. Tours begin in Rose Garden at 11 a.m.

Scheu will host the next potting workshop on Saturday, May 22, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. The $5 per person fee includes a sample of plant specimens to take home. Reservations are required; call 763-4789, ext. 3. Check the website’s list of events for all kinds of activities scheduled throughout the remainder of the year.

Rose terrace at The Fells. Photo courtesy of thefells.org.

Bedrock Gardens

45 High Road, Lee 828-8300, bedrockgardens.org

Colorful history: The original farmhouse at Bedrock Gardens dates back to the 18th century, and the property was a dairy farm from 1845 to 1957. It was sold to the present owner in 1980 on a handshake, the 37 acres having been abandoned for about 40 years. It was first cleared of poison ivy and puckerbrush, and the landscaping project started around 1987, adding access to roads along with garden beds and a wildlife pond. About two-thirds of the property is now gardens.

The brains behind the beauty: Led by Executive DirectorJohn Forti, Bedrock Gardens also has a group of volunteers and a small ground crew. The founders are still very involved: “The two of them are like having a staff of a dozen,” Forti said.

Standout features: One main focus at Bedrock Gardens is showcasing rare and unusual native plants. “Everything looks vaguely familiar, but [for example], you’ve never seen a maple quite like that,” Forti said. There’s the ornamental Grass Acre — “the space was designed to look like an impressionist painting,” Forti said. “It evolves through the whole season.” There’s also a spiral garden, a rock garden, a Japanese Tea House and garden, and a serpentine waterway that Forti particularly likes, with its lotus and water lilies and the sense of motion that it adds to the landscape.

Growing season: “We are a garden that looks at sustainability,” Forti said. “We’re not racing to put out tens of thousands of annuals in the spring. … We really rely on perennials.

Of course there are a few garden cleanup days, plus planting the annuals and improving soil quality, he said, but the garden is laid out on a sort of grid system so that everything is easy to get to and maintain.

Your garden experience: “Unlike a lot of other public gardens, it’s not a single design space — it’s a landscape journey,” Forti said. “Over the course of 37 acres it keeps you moving through room after room, and each space has its own feeling and emotion.”

Forti said there are a number of ways to enjoy the garden, whether you want to take a walk along the mile-plus of walking trails, get a guided tour to learn about the gardens, or just relax. Forti said that one volunteer has said that when she walks through the gardens her blood pressure goes down about 20 points.

“Some people are just going there to quiet their minds … [and] enjoy nature,” he said. “They love to relax into the landscape. … You might be relaxing and reflecting by a pond and then move on … to a different garden.”

He said you can spend a couple hours there or a whole day — and there’s no “best” time of the year to visit.

“It’s so different by the season, and that’s … part of its design,” he said.

The details: Bedrock Gardens opened for the season on May 12 and is open Tuesday through Friday, and the first and third weekends of the month, through Oct. 11. The hours each day are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There’s a suggested donation of $10 per adult; children 12 and under get in free. Daily overview garden tours are offered Tuesday through Friday at 10:15 a.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 10:15 a.m. and 1 p.m., when open. The guided tours are free with admission. You can also take a self-guided tour and spend as much time as you want on the property; you will be given a map with a suggested route.

Rose terrace at The Fells. Photo courtesy of thefells.org.

Kirkwood Gardens

Squam Lakes Natural Science Center, 23 Science Center Road, Holderness, 968-7194, nhnature.org

Colorful history: Kirkwood Gardens is about an acre in size and was created on the grounds of the historic Holderness Inn, in the space of a former parking lot. In trying to figure out what should take the place of the parking lot, a plan put together by internationally known landscape designer — and six-year Science Center trustee — “Sunny” Grace Kirkwood won out. It used plants that are adapted to grow well in New Hampshire and that are attractive to birds, bees and other pollinators, according to resident garden expert Brenda Erler. Erler said Kirkwood was very elderly when she was designing the garden. “Her nurse would actually bring her to the gardens, complete with her oxygen tank, and she would just sit for hours and watch the shadows to see how [the sun would hit the plants],” Erler said. The entire community pitched in to make the design happen, from an anonymous gift to amend the soil to area garden centers and local residents donating plants, garden features and labor. Kirkwood only survived long enough to see the upper garden planted, Erler said; that was completed in August 1996, and Kirkwood died in September. “It was the last garden that she ever donated in the United States,” Erler said.

The brains behind the beauty: According to Marketing Manager Amanda Gillen, Brenda Erler is the “expert on all things Kirkwood Gardens.” Erler has been at the Science Center since before the gardens were designed, and she leads a group of volunteers in maintaining the gardens.

Standout features: A 25- by 60-foot bluestone patio offers scenic views and a place to sit in the summer shade. The upper garden has a variety of ferns, hostas, azaleas, rhododendrons and other shade-loving plants, while the lower garden features sun-loving shrubs, trees and perennials, a sundial and a millstone fountain that attracts birds and butterflies.

Growing season: Erler said that each season she and a group of volunteers do the pruning and cleanup of winter debris as well as improvements and enhancements. “We keep kind of adding things to the fringes and [consider the] things we want to improve the looks of, [like] the exits, the entrances.” She said at the start of the season the volunteers do a walkaround to see how the plants are doing and whether any need to be replaced or moved, and they figure out which annuals to plant.

Your garden experience: “People will see plants that will work well in their yard,” Erler said, noting that the plants have been labeled and a kiosk has information for every plant, including their growing conditions, to help anyone who might want to bring something home for their own garden. “You can spend time learning about the plants or just sitting on one of the benches and enjoying it,” Erler said. “People use the garden in all different ways.” There’s also a list of birds and butterflies to help people ID them.

Erler said that while the bulbs are “going like mad right now,” the gardens always have something to offer.

“Sunny was just a master at designing things, and there’s always something in bloom,” she said. “It changes radically through the seasons.”

One of Erler’s favorites is Joe Pye weed, a native plant that grows in wetlands.

“Most of the year people just ignore it, but when it goes into bloom the butterflies absolutely lose their minds over it,” she said. “There are so many monarchs hanging on it.”

Details: Kirkwood Gardens is open to the public daily, and there is no cost to get in and no need for reservations. However, if you want to spend a day at the Squam Lakes Science Center, admission is $18 for adults and seniors and $13 for ages 3 to 15, and it includes the live animal exhibit trail and all hiking trails. Trail passes must be pre-purchased online before arriving at the Science Center. The live animal exhibit trail and hiking trails are open daily from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. (last trail admission is 3:30 p.m.).

More public gardens
Here are a few other public gardens to check out. If you know of any more beautiful public spaces like these, let us know at news@hippopress.com.

Maple Hill Gardens 
Beaver Brook Association, 117 Ridge Road, 465-7787, beaverbrook.org
The 13 theme gardens, wildflower trail and natural play area are open to the public daily. The gardens are maintained by volunteers, and garden tours and presentations are available. 

Prescott Park
Marcy Street, Portsmouth, 610-7208, cityofportsmouth.com/prescottpark
The gardens at Prescott Park are free and open to the public. In 1975, 40 formal garden beds were created on the South Lawn of Prescott Park, designed to study which varieties of ornamental plants performed best in the seacoast environment. Now, the gardens continue to be planted and maintained by the city’s Parks & Greenery department, which IDs the plants and flowers for visitors.

Tarbin Gardens
321 Salisbury Road, Franklin, 934-3518, tarbingardens.com
Opening in June, Tarbin Gardens is a hand-built English landscape garden covering five acres, with all kinds of plants, plus greenhouses, ponds and wildlife. The cost of admission (cash only) is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and students, and $30 for families of two parents and two or more children. Hours are Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Featured photo: Pollinator on Cosmos. Photo courtesy of Squam Lakes Natural Science Center.

Play Ball!

Baseball returns as the NH Fisher Cats take the field

Panoramic view of Northeast Delta Dental Stadium in Manchester, home of the New Hampshire Fisher Cats. Courtesy photo.

It has been more than 600 days since the New Hampshire Fisher Cats last played a home game at Manchester’s Northeast Delta Dental Stadium, in August 2019. On Tuesday, May 11, the minor-league Double A affiliate of the Toronto Blue Jays will hold its season opener for the 2021 season, ending the nearly two-year professional baseball drought in the Granite State.

“I can’t tell you how excited I am to be able to welcome fans back to the ballpark,” team president Mike Ramshaw said. “I’m sure it’s going to be an emotional day for a lot of people.”

The Fisher Cats’ front office team has been closely following guidance from the State and from Major League Baseball, implementing a number of safety measures ahead of this season. Here’s a look at what you can expect when you come to the ballpark, plus some other events and happenings the front office has in store for this season.

Safety first

Northeast Delta Dental Stadium will be operating at 50 percent capacity, meaning it will be capped at just around 3,000 fans per game. In an effort to maintain social distancing, tickets will only be sold in “pods,” limited to two, four, six, eight or 10 people, with at least six feet between pods. At least 12 feet also separates the first row of seats from each dugout and bullpen.

“We’re really encouraging digital ticketing this year, just to try to limit the interaction between our staff and the fans,” Ramshaw said. “We’ll have ticketing that can be emailed or texted to you, and then [our staff] can just scan it and you’ll be good to go.”

Fans will not be allowed to congregate during any pregame happenings such as team batting practice, nor will there be autograph signings this year. During game play, Ramshaw said, masks or face-coverings are required for everyone over 2 years old, even when seated, except for when actively eating or drinking. Seats not in use during games will be Velcro-secured.

The types and sizes of bags that fans are allowed to bring into the park will be limited, also in an effort to limit staff interaction. Only necessary items such as medical bags, diaper bags and small clutch purses of about four-and-a-half by six-and-a-half inches will be allowed.

All of the concessions on the concourse, which include everything from hot dogs and hamburgers to french fries, peanuts, popcorn and domestic beers, will be open during games. Team officials are encouraging credit and debit card use whenever possible.

Both team stores will also be open, but at limited capacity. Ramshaw said there will be continuous sanitation throughout the park, especially on the concourse and in other high-traffic areas. In the event of rain delays, fans will be encouraged to return to their cars for the duration of the storm to avoid large gatherings. The Planet Fitness children’s play area will be open, but the bounce house has been removed in favor of other games that can be easily sanitized, like a giant inflatable tic-tac-toe game with basketballs that will be set up.

Coming out swinging

Despite the new precautions in place, the Fisher Cats will still be holding many of its usual special events throughout the season, including fireworks and giveaways.

“It will be a little different experience from what the fan is used to … and we just ask for our fans’ understanding and patience as we go through Covid,” Ramshaw said. “Minor league baseball is always about the player and fan interaction … [and] we want to still be able to bring as much as possible during a pandemic.”

Both the first home game of the season on May 11 and the game on Saturday, May 22, against the Portland Sea Dogs, for example, will wrap up with a fireworks show courtesy of Atlas Fireworks. Several giveaways are also planned, like for a magnet schedule on May 11 and May 12, and for a youth shirsey from former Fisher Cats player (and current Blue Jays major leaguer) Vladimir Guerrero Jr. on May 16.

The Fisher Cats will honor local essential workers and first responders, during the games on May 13 and May 14, respectively. Saturday, May 15, is Game Show Night, when fans will be challenged with trivia questions, puzzles and more in styles of popular game shows like Family Feud, Jeopardy! and Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? More upcoming promotions will be announced on a monthly basis as the season goes on.

Nashua Silver Knights
Where
: Holman Stadium, 67 Amherst St., Nashua
When: Home opener is Thursday, May 27, at 6 p.m., against the Worcester Bravehearts (this game will also include a championship ring ceremony)
Cost: Single game tickets start at $8 (limited to groups of 10 people); concessions are priced per item. Season ticket rates are also available.
Visit: nashuasilverknights.com

Following a championship-winning 2020 season, the Nashua Silver Knights will aim to defend their title in 2021, holding their home opener on Thursday, May 27. They will face off against the Worcester Bravehearts at Holman Stadium in the Gate City.
The Silver Knights are one of eight teams of the Futures Collegiate Baseball League, a summer league gathering college baseball players from throughout the New England area. Although the start of the team’s 2020 season was delayed by about a month, front office general manager Cam Cook said the Silver Knights were able to play a shortened season that began on July 2.
For much of the 2020 season Holman Stadium was only filled at 25 percent capacity, or around 750 fans. This year, Cook said, it will likely be raised to 50 percent, pending final City approval. The home opener will feature a championship ring ceremony, while other promotions will include several fireworks nights on game days throughout June and July.

Schedule and league changes

In ways similar to those of Major League Baseball teams in 2020, the pandemic has impacted the Fisher Cats’ schedule as the team tries to limit the amount of out-of-state travel among players.

The team will host the Portland Sea Dogs, Double A affiliate of the Boston Red Sox, 18 times in 2021 — a record since the Fisher Cats’ first season in New Hampshire in 2004.

“I know many of our fans always enjoy seeing the future Red Sox play here, so that’s going to be a big perk,” Fisher Cats broadcasting and media relations manager Tyler Murray said. “[The Sea Dogs] are coming three different times, each for a six-game series.”

In fact, adjustments to the Minor League Baseball schedule have the Fisher Cats either at home or on the road for six-game series matchups throughout the entire season, from Tuesday through Sunday with Mondays always designated off days. Half of the team’s 120-game season will be played within New England, with the exception of a few trips to New York and Pennsylvania, and one trip to Bowie, Maryland, at the end of June.

Due to a reorganization of certain team classifications that begins in 2021, the Fisher Cats will be playing a new rival during their opening homestand — the Somerset Patriots, who were announced as the new Double A affiliate of the New York Yankees late last year.

Under Minor League Baseball’s new scheduling format, there will be no All Star Game or playoffs this year. The Fisher Cats will close out their 2021 season with a series at home against the Harrisburg Senators, Double A affiliate of the Washington Nationals, from Sept. 14 to Sept. 19.

Field of opportunity

Even though the Fisher Cats didn’t play a single game in 2020, the team’s front office stayed busy throughout the year, hosting all kinds of socially distanced events on the field.

“The staff … worked so hard to try to find ways that we could stay engaged in the community and still pull off some of the events that we could do in the absence of baseball,” Ramshaw said. “We didn’t actually find out that the baseball season was going to be canceled until closer to July. … So for us, we were just trying to figure out how we could do other things in the interim.”

Immediately turning out to be a success, he said, was hosting local high school and college graduation ceremonies on the field. As the summer and fall went on, the Fisher Cats office hosted everything from a food truck festival and “Dinner on the Diamond” events to socially distanced movie nights and an outdoor concert series in partnership with the Palace Theatre, as well as a cornhole tournament, a fashion show, and even a Shakespeare-esque performance from members of the Cue Zero Theatre Co.

“We’ve always thought about a lot of the things that we were able to do last year, but never really had the bandwidth or time to do them,” Ramshaw said. “I think people and companies are realizing that we’re not just a ballpark but we’re a venue … [and] when you spread everybody out socially distanced, the park looks empty with 1,000 people.”

In 2021, Ramshaw said, events are already being booked for dates when the team is on the road, including graduation ceremonies. There have also been conversations to bring back the outdoor concert series in the summer months.

“Hopefully as things start to change throughout the duration of the summer, we can try to get some more fans out to the ballpark,” he said. “I think the ultimate goal would be that we’re able to be at 100 percent capacity by the end of the year.”

Upcoming NH Fisher Cats team promotions
Tuesday, May 11: Atlas Fireworks show
Wednesday, May 12: Magnet schedule giveaway
Thursday, May 13: Essential Workers Night
Friday, May 14: First Responders Night
Saturday, May 15: Game Show Night
Sunday, May 16: Vladimir Guerrero Jr. youth shirsey giveaway

Keeping NH in the picture

From the 1981 classic On Golden Pond to parts of this year’s Oscar-winning Sound of Metal, New Hampshire has been a filming location for a number of movies. Since 1998, the New Hampshire Film Bureau has assisted filmmakers eyeing the Granite State for their films, serving as the connection between them and the state government and communities. But if the latest state budget proposal is approved, that resource may not be around for much longer. People from the New Hampshire film industry discussed what’s at stake if the Film Bureau is dissolved, and why New Hampshire is a film destination worth fighting for.

The reel deal

Gov. Chris Sununu’s proposed state budget for 2022-2023 includes the defunding and elimination of the New Hampshire Film Bureau, currently allocated a $123,000 annual budget.

The budget proposal has been passed by the House and now heads to the Senate, which is scheduled to meet on June 4. If it’s approved, New Hampshire will become one of only five states without an official state film office.

Matt Newton, the New Hampshire Film Bureau’s director and only employee, declined to comment on the office’s future and directed media inquiries to the Division of Travel and Tourism Development, which emailed a statement on behalf of Business and Economic Affairs Commissioner Taylor Caswell:

“While the workload of the Bureau of Film and Digital Media has declined for the past several years, the Governor’s budget proposal ensures that the Division of Travel and Tourism Development will retain sufficient resources to meet the needs of New Hampshire’s film industry,” the statement said. “Further, this consolidation of services ensures a more comprehensive approach, spearheaded by the Department of Business and Economic Affairs, to promote the development of New Hampshire’s travel and tourism industry.”

Jack Northcott, a Hollis resident and senior director of sales at Avid Technology, a media production software company in Burlington, Mass., said he is skeptical that the Division of Travel and Tourism Development will continue the Film Bureau’s work.

“That claim … is very disingenuous, because they aren’t articulating whether or not the Film Bureau will remain in name and the Film Bureau website will still be supported,” he said. “Will there be somebody there who actually cares?”

When the Hippo pressed the Division of Travel and Tourism Development for confirmation that the “consolidation of services” would mean the elimination of the “New Hampshire Film office” in name and as a direct point of contact for filmmakers, Division of Travel and Tourism Development communications manager Kris Neilsen replied via email, “Correct, [filmmakers] will reach out to the NH Travel and Tourism office.”

Tim Messina of Studio Lab, a video production studio in Derry, also expressed concern about the Department’s ability to take over the Film Bureau’s role.

“[How is] someone from the Travel and Tourism department, who doesn’t have any experience in our industry … going to [answer] very industry-specific questions that come up?” he said.

Trigger House commercial shoot for Hisense using volume from Studio Lab in Derry. Photo courtesy of Studio Lab.

The benefits of having a film office

Tim Messina of Studio Lab said he utilized the Film Bureau a few weeks ago when a filmmaker friend of his asked him where to get permits for shooting at Mount Washington.

“The Film office … told me exactly where to go and who to talk to,” he said. “It was a less-than-five-minute conversation.”

Tyler York, senior producer at Big Brick Productions in Manchester, works on commercial and brand video content and short form documentary-style videos for regional, national and international clients, such as New Hampshire Lottery, iRobot, Hasbro Gaming, Red Bull, ESPN, Fox Sports, Chobani and more. He said state film offices are “crucial” to his job as they provide a connection between the film industry and state legislators, municipalities, police forces and town and city officials.

“We do productions all over, and when we’re shooting [in another state], we traditionally reach out to that state’s film office for help with sourcing location permits and things like that.”

Chris Stinson, a producer and line producer at the Portsmouth-based film production company Live Free or Die Films, said he also has depended on the services provided by state film offices for his work. Stinson worked as the line producer for the 2020 film Sound of Metal, which includes a driving scene shot on New Hampshire’s Kancamagus Highway. The film was nominated for six Oscars and won two — one for Film Editing and one for Sound — at the April 25 awards ceremony.

Stinson recalled a time when representatives from the Massachusetts Film Office joined him at a meeting where he pitched Massachusetts as a shooting location for the 2019 film Knives Out.

“[The filmmakers] were considering shooting it in London, but we convinced them to come to Massachusetts,” he said. “If the Massachusetts Film Office hadn’t helped, that movie definitely would have gone to London.”

In the 2018 Hippo story “Going professional: How to take your creative hobby to the next level,” Newton explained how the Film Bureau assisted and advised filmmakers in hiring a crew, securing a shooting location, and marketing and distributing their films. The Bureau also maintains an online directory of local hireable film crew and film services, including camera operators, directors, editors, casting and talent resources, hair and makeup and wardrobe professionals, sound specialists, stunt people, production managers and assistants, payroll and production accountants, public relations and more.

The Bureau’s primary job is acting as the official liaison between filmmakers and New Hampshire communities and state government, to help filmmakers find shooting locations and acquire permits necessary for road closures and access to public spaces.

“If you have a small film, closing a road might sound like a big deal,” Newton said in the 2018 story, “but working with [the Film Bureau] lends more credibility to your project. We can open doors that you might not be able to open by yourself.”

Losing a NH booster

Northcott said the state has offered little explanation about the reasoning behind the proposal to eliminate the Film Bureau.

“We just haven’t been able to get a lot of feedback or dialogue from them,” he said.

Having worked with more than 30 state film offices over the course of his career, Stinson said he sees no reason New Hampshire wouldn’t be able to maintain its film office.

“A lot of these other states’ film offices don’t have a big budget either; a lot of them are one-person offices, too,” he said, “but they’re still incredibly enthusiastic about bringing productions to their state. New Hampshire doesn’t even offer that.”

Ian Messina, director of virtual production at Studio Lab (and Tim Messina’s nephew), said he, too, is at a loss.

“New Hampshire has so many different pockets of small businesses, and filmmaking is one of them, so why shouldn’t it have the same resources that other businesses have?”

York said he believes a lack of awareness is to blame.

“Many people, [including] legislators, don’t know that there’s a film industry happening here and that there’s potential and opportunity for the film industry to grow here,” he said.

Losing the Film Bureau would be detrimental to the state’s film industry in a big way, Tim Messina said.

“Without [a film office], we just lose our sense of direction as a state in the film world,” he said. “We can make it work [independently] to an extent, but the state is still a big part of it.”

A fear being echoed by many people in the New Hampshire film industry is losing credibility that comes with having an official state film office.

“It’s so much cleaner when you can say, ‘I’m calling from the New Hampshire Film office,’ as opposed to, ‘Hey, I’m Joe Schmo off the street, and we have a production coming to town,’” York said.

Eliminating the Film Bureau may also disadvantage young and aspiring filmmakers looking to stay in New Hampshire, Northcott said, or prompt them to move to another state that has more opportunities and a more prominent support system for filmmakers. As a member of the advisory committee for a Nashua-based film education program for high school students, Northcott said he’s seeing it happen already.

“You have all these students who are just dying to get into television and film production, but there’s no outlet for them locally, or they’re very limited in what they can do,” he said. “WMUR can only hire so many people.”

Location, location

While New Hampshire remains largely untouched by out-of-state filmmakers, its southern neighbor boasts one of the most active and fastest growing film landscapes in the country.

“There are four or five movies and TV shows filming in Massachusetts as we speak,” Stinson said. “It just seems crazy to me that New Hampshire gets zero of that action.”

One of Massachusetts’ biggest selling points as a film destination — and the reason New Hampshire is often overlooked — is the 25 percent tax credit it awards filmmakers, Stinson said. New Hampshire, though it offers no tax incentives, has other perks that filmmakers would value just as much as, if not more than, Massachusetts’ tax credit, he said, but most filmmakers never take the time to research New Hampshire or never even consider New Hampshire as an option in the first place.

“They see ‘25 percent tax credit’ and that’s all they’re focused on,” Stinson said.

While filming Knives Out in Massachusetts, Stinson said, the crew stayed in a mansion for three weeks, costing them $500,000. If they had been filming in New Hampshire, he said, he is “absolutely sure” they could have found a comparable mansion for between $50,000 and $100,000.

“By going to a cheaper location you’ve saved 50 percent more money than [you would have saved] with the 25 percent tax credit in Massachusetts,” Stinson said, adding that lodging in New Hampshire usually costs 30 to 50 percent less than in Massachusetts.

Crews would also save money on permitting fees and on parking, which could cost up to $3,000 or $4,000 in Massachusetts, compared to between $500 and $1,000 in New Hampshire.

Massachusetts’ robust film office is also a major contributor to the success of its film industry, York said — and New Hampshire should take notes.

“With Massachusetts performing at the caliber that they are, it’s disappointing and, in my opinion, shortsighted,” York said, “for New Hampshire to forego a film office at this point.”

Shooting on the moon with virtual production volume at Studio Lab in Derry. Photo courtesy of Studio Lab.

Banding together

According to Tim Messina, more than 100 people who work or have an interest in New Hampshire’s film industry have signed on to a grassroots effort to preserve the state film office in some capacity, including acclaimed documentary filmmaker and New Hampshire resident Ken Burns.

“If it does have to [merge with] another department, one of the best solutions would be to create a board of directors — people who are in the industry and understand it — that can help administrate what that [merge] would look like and how it’s going to function,” Tim Messina said.

Some members of the group have been volunteering their time and resources to improve the Film Bureau since before it was at risk of being eliminated.

Stinson, for example, has spent more than a year independently creating a visual database of filming locations in New Hampshire — a project normally shouldered by a state film office, he said.

“When a filmmaker is considering shooting in a state, they go to that state’s film office website to look at film location pictures, so having a location database is huge,” he said, “and if I have to do it on my own, I’m willing to do that.”

Northcott said the group has even gone so far as to offer to fund the film office themselves.

“There are a lot of people who are interested [in] and supportive of the Film Bureau,” he said. “I know we could raise the private funding easily.”

The Division of Travel and Tourism Development “gave no response and had no interest” in the proposition, Northcott said. (Reached shortly before press time, a spokesperson for the Division said they would need time to formulate a comment and couldn’t do so by press time.)

Tim Messina is also seeking the general public’s support in preserving the Film Bureau. On the Studio Labs website (studiolab.community/post/helpsavenhfilm), he outlined a four-point strategy that includes reaching out and advocating to the governor, the Senate Finance Committee, local senators and film and media organizations in the state. He urged advocates to explain how the issue affects them and include financial data about the film industry’s contribution to the state’s creative economy.

New Hampshire film highlights
Here’s a look at some of the most notable movies that were filmed or partially filmed in New Hampshire, according to IMDB and Wikipedia.

The Thomas Crown Affair, 1968, starring Steven McQueen and Faye Dunaway, scenes filmed in Salem
On Golden Pond, 1981, starring Henry Fonda, Katharine Hepburn and James Fonda, scenes filmed at Squam Lake in Holderness
The Good Son, 1993, starring Macaulay Culkin and Elijah Wood, scenes filmed at Mirror Lake in Jackson
Jumanji, 1995, starring Robin Williams and Kirsten Dunst, scenes filmed in Keene
The Skulls, 2000, starring Joshua Jackson and Paul Walker, scenes filmed at Dartmouth College in Hanover
The Brown Bunny, 2003, starring Vincent Gallo and Chloë Sevigny, scenes filmed in Keene
Live Free or Die, 2006, starring Aaron Stanford, Paul Schneider and Zooey Deschanel, shot in Claremont
Sound of Metal, 2020, starring Riz Ahmed and Olivia Cooke, scenes filmed on New Hampshire’s Kancamagus Highway. Chris Stinson of Portsmouth served as line producer for the film.

Plant now, eat later

What to start growing this spring so you can feast this summer

If you want to enjoy garden-fresh fruits and veggies from your own backyard, now is the time to plant them. Local horticulture experts shared some tips on how to get your plants in the ground, care for them while they grow and harvest them when the time is right. And, if you need some inspiration for how to use your homegrown bounty in the kitchen, there’s some cooking tips and recipes to get you started.

Beets

Plant now: “Beets are a hardy crop and easy to plant,” Erler said. They can be sown from seed outside, even before the last frost. Plant the seeds around an inch deep, allowing for at least a couple of inches between each plant and around a foot between each row.

Watch them grow: Beets like a well-draining, sandy soil, Erler said, and a minimum of six hours of direct sunlight. Water the plant lightly, keeping the top inch of soil evenly and consistently moist.

Out to harvest: Beets can be harvested after six to eight weeks, ideally no later than June as they don’t grow as well in the summer heat. Use your best judgment, Erler said, and when in doubt, it’s better to harvest them too early than too late. “There’s a point where it will have gotten as big as it’s going to get, and if it sits in the ground too long, [the beets] get kind of tough on the inside,” she said.

Eat later: Beet smoothie

Recipe by Sara Oberle, Nutrition Connections Teacher, and courtesy of UNH Cooperative Extension.

Serving size 1½ cups. Serves two.

1 cup plain yogurt

1 frozen banana, peeled

1/2 medium beet

1 teaspoon fresh ginger

1/2 cup frozen mango

1/2 cup frozen mixed berries (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries and blackberries)

1 cup ice cubes

1 cup water

Place all of the ingredients in the order given into a blender and blend until smooth. Pour into a glass and enjoy.

Bell peppers

Plant now: As with tomatoes, you should plant bell peppers indoors if you want to start growing them now.

“Bell peppers take a little bit longer, probably about eight to 10 weeks, to go from seed to transplant,” Bernitz said. “They like very warm soil and warm weather.”

Watch them grow: As long as you give them the light and temperatures they need, Bernitz said peppers are a relatively easy vegetable to grow. As with peas, peppers should not be overfertilized.

“Some varieties of peppers benefit from staking,” he said. “Certain varieties are going to mature quicker than others. … A more advanced technique would be using black plastic mulch, like you might see on a farm. It helps to warm the soil.”

Out to harvest: According to Bernitz, peppers can be picked green and immature as long as they are full-sized and firm. They can be cut from the plant using clippers, scissors, pruners or a sharp knife and will have a short storage life of only one to two weeks.

Eat later: Peppers that are allowed to ripen on the plant, Bernitz said, will be sweeter and more nutritious. You can use them as ingredients in sandwiches or soups, or dice and combine them with tomatoes and other ingredients like garlic, onions and cilantro to create a dipping salsa for tortilla chips.

Carrots

Plant now: Carrots can be sown from seed directly outside. Since carrot seeds are so tiny, it’s easier to just sprinkle the seeds in a row rather than planting individual seeds; you can space them out as they grow, Erler said. “You pull out some of the little baby carrots in between [plants] to make sure they’re properly spaced,” she said. “You’re sacrificing a few, but you’re going to get nice, full-sized carrots.”

Watch them grow: Carrots like a soil that is rich, yet well-draining, such as a loamy soil, Erler said. They need at least six hours of direct sunlight and at least an inch of water per week.

Out to harvest: Carrots can be harvested after eight to 10 weeks, depending on how the tops look. “If that much time has elapsed and the top is really large, it’s probably done all it’s going to do,” Erler said. “You’ll just get diminishing returns if you leave it in longer, like the carrots will get hard and woody.” Ideally, you should be able to pull the carrots out of the soil by hand with little resistance, but you can loosen the surrounding soil with a garden fork if necessary. “Worst-case scenario, the top breaks off when you try to pull it out, and then you’ll just need to grab a tool to dig it out of the ground,” Erler said.

Eat later: Carrot dip

Recipe by Lisa Richards and courtesy of UNH Cooperative Extension.

Serves 6

6 carrots, shredded

1 1/2 cups nonfat yogurt, plain

1 clove of garlic, mashed

1 tablespoon olive oil

Juice from 1/2 a lemon

1/2 teaspoon salt

18 4-inch celery strips

24 cherry tomatoes

Wash, peel and grate carrots. Add garlic, olive oil, lemon juice and salt to yogurt. Stir. Add carrots to yogurt mixture. Mix well. Serve with celery, tomatoes and other vegetables, if desired.

Herbs

Plant now: Some culinary herbs can be planted outdoors now or in the next one to two weeks, while for others you’ll need to wait until steadier warm weather arrives, according to Maria Noel Groves, owner of Wintergreen Botanicals in Allenstown and author of the book Grow Your Own Herbal Remedies. If you’re starting from seeds, you can usually find information on the seed packet on how long it will take the crop to germinate (when the seedling pops out of the soil) and mature (when it’s ready to be harvested). This can take a few weeks to a month, depending on the plant.

Watch them grow: Culinary herbs can be grown and harvested on their own, while some can thrive when paired up with others. Local experts say it all comes down to the ecosystem each one prefers.

“If you’ve got Mediterranean herbs like rosemary and thyme that like lots of sunlight, then they would be OK to go together,” said Jessica LaBrie, owner of Blackbird’s Daughter Botanicals in Barrington and a past president of the New Hampshire Herbal Network. “You might keep herbs that like a lot more watering together, like parsley and dill.”

Thyme and mint, Groves said, are among some of the herbs that can handle a bit of colder temperatures. Others prefer warmer or drier conditions.

“Mediterranean herbs are not going to survive outside right now,” she said. “Rosemary is definitely one of the ones that likes it more dry. Basil likes a hot, rich soil and lots of sun.”

Out to harvest: LaBrie said it’s a good idea to let your plants get established before you begin regularly harvesting —‌ you can usually tell by their smell or their feel.

“With a lot of herbs, if you pinch off the new growth it will grow back even bushier,” she said. “It’s like giving them a little haircut every couple of days.”

Eat later: Groves said she likes to use her herbs in all kinds of ways in the kitchen, from simply adding them to a glass of seltzer water to using them as ingredients in a variety of dishes.

“If I’m making a nice savory breakfast, maybe with eggs, I could have them with basil or sage,” she said. “If we’re making Mexican food, like tacos, then I’ll use a lot of cilantro, oregano and parsley. I also like to do some Korean and Thai-inspired meals like bowls or stir-frys with herbs.”

Kale

Plant now: Kale can be sown from seed outdoors, or it can be started inside and transplanted outdoors after around four weeks, when it gets its first sets of leaves. “Both [ways to plant] are options, but if you plant them directly in the garden they probably aren’t going to get quite as big and are going to take a little longer before you can harvest them [than if you start them indoors],” Earler said.

Watch them grow: Kale “isn’t too fussy” with its growing requirements, Erler said. Just give it a well-draining, sandy soil, at least six hours full sun, and water whenever the soil feels dry. The biggest concern with growing kale, Erler said, is pests, such as cabbage worms, aphids and certain kinds of moths. “You want to make sure you’re looking closely at the plants and scouting for insects often, at least a couple times a week, to make sure that nothing is getting out of hand,” she said. If you do find yourself with an insect problem, she said, consult your local garden store about an insecticide or a row cover.

Out to harvest: “Kale is nice because you can harvest it as you go along,” Erler said. Simply remove the leaves as desired, using a pair of gardening scissors or by twisting them off by hand. Always pick the oldest leaves first, growing from the base of the plant.

Eat later: Kale chips

Recipe by Caitlin Porter and courtesy of UNH Cooperative Extension.

Serves 4.

1 bunch kale, red or curly

1 Tablespoon olive oil

1/4 teaspoon salt

2 Tablespoons Parmesan cheese

1/4 teaspoon paprika

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Wash and completely dry kale leaves, remove stems. Tear into medium to large size pieces, place in a medium to large bowl. Add all the other ingredients and toss until kale is coated. Line a baking sheet with foil, coat with non-stick cooking spray. Spread kale onto baking sheet in a single layer. It might take two baking sheets. If using two baking sheets, make sure to rotate them halfway through the cooking time. Cook for 20 to 25 minutes. Store any leftovers in an airtight container.

Lettuce

Plant now: Any type of lettuce you can buy at the grocery store is one you can also grow yourself —‌ the easiest to grow is loose leaf lettuce, as it is the quickest to mature at about four weeks.

“Lettuce … can withstand light to moderate frost and will tolerate some shade, but it really prefers a lot of sun,” Bernitz said. “Loose leaf lettuce is really good for planting in the spring, for both containers and raised beds. … You’re planting in early to mid-April, and harvesting all May and June long if you’re planting it successionally.”

Watch them grow: Depending on your variety of choice, from smaller loose leaf lettuce to larger heads, Bernitz you might need a little extra space between each for them to grow.

“Lettuce is something you don’t want to plant too deeply. The seeds should be just below the surface of the soil,” he said.

Out to harvest: Most varieties of lettuce take about 40 to 50 days and then can be harvested over and over throughout the season, according to Munroe. Like spinach, Bernitz said, lettuce is best harvested at cooler temperatures. You can harvest individual leaves or alternatively cut the entire plant at or just above the surface of your soil.

Eat later: Most lettuces can go great in salads, sandwiches or wraps. Romaine lettuce, according to information from the New Hampshire Farm to School’s Harvest of the Month program, is typically viewed as the most nutrient-rich.

Onions

Plant now: If you’re looking for a “big, supermarket size” onion, Erler said, there are two ways to plant them: You can start them from seed in a container indoors, then transport them outside after several weeks when they’ve sprouted, or you can grow them from an onion set, a tiny, immature onion bulb, which can be planted outside. Plant the seeds or sets no deeper than an inch, allowing several inches of space between each plant.

Watch them grow: Onions grow well in a rich, loamy soil, with a full day of direct sunlight. They like having plenty of water, Erler said, so make sure the soil stays consistently moist.

Out to harvest: The growing time for onions is longer than that for most other vegetables, Erler said. Expect to harvest at the end of the summer, around three to four months after planting. You’ll know they’re ready once their tops start to yellow and fall over.

Eat later: Onion casserole

Recipe by Sara Oberle, Nutrition Connections Teacher, and courtesy of UNH Cooperative Extension.

4 large onions, diced

1 Tablespoon olive oil

1 cup long grain rice, cooked according to package directions

⅔ cup milk

¼ teaspoon black pepper

¼ teaspoon salt

⅛ teaspoon ground allspice

½ cup cheddar cheese, grated

Cook rice according to package directions and set aside. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. In a skillet add olive oil and diced onions. Sauté for 5 minutes or until soft and translucent. In a large bowl add the sautéed onions, cooked rice, milk, black pepper, salt, and ground allspice; stir until blended. Pour into a lightly oiled casserole dish. Sprinkle the grated cheddar cheese on top. Cover and bake for 40 minutes. Remove cover and bake for 5 more minutes until cheese begins to brown.

Peas

Plant now: Peas are considered cool-season veggies that should be planted now, according to Nate Bernitz, home horticulture outreach program manager for the UNH Cooperative Extension.

“In order to get a good crop of peas, you’d want to plant them early in the spring, to give them time to mature before it gets too hot out,” Bernitz said. “Their ideal temperatures are between 60 and 75 degrees. … I’d also recommend planting peas successionally, which means making additional plantings every week or couple of weeks rather than all at once. It guarantees you a good continuous harvest, because peas are veggies you want to eat soon after they’re ready.”

Watch them grow: Bernitz said peas do best when growing on something they can climb on —‌ you can use some kind of trellis, or make your own using chicken wire, sticks or other materials. Peas shouldn’t be overfertilized, either.

“They really thrive when given that space,” he said. “I would also say that peas … do really well when grown with other crops. So peas and spinach, for example, go really well together. Peas are kind of slow growing, whereas spinach grows quickly.”

Out to harvest: Peas will flower and produce pods that can be picked when ready to be harvested. Depending on the variety, this can take around 50 to 60 days from when you plant it, although some may produce pods sooner than others, according to Justin Munroe, founder and executive director of the nonprofit Grow Nashua.

Eat later: According to Bernitz, peas will taste sweet, tender and non-starchy when ready to be harvested. Peas or pea pods can be enjoyed as a side vegetable to a protein, while pea shoots can be added in dishes like pastas or potato salads.

Radishes

Plant now: Radishes can be sown by seed outside in the spring. Plant the seeds about 1/4 inch deep in the soil, spaced a couple of inches apart and in rows about a foot apart. “They need space,” Erler said. “If you aren’t really careful in the way that you space them, you may need to thin them out a bit [as they grow].”

Watch them grow: Radishes prefer a well-draining, sandy soil and at least six hours of full sun each day. It’s very important that radishes get enough water, Erler said, as that can directly affect how the radishes come out. “They tend to have a milder flavor and be more tender when they’ve had plenty of water,” she said. “[If they haven’t] they can end up pithy or woody and really spicy.” Give them at least an inch of water a week, more if conditions are hot or dry.

Out to harvest: Radishes have a quicker turn-around than most vegetables, Erler said, reaching maturity in as little as two to three weeks. Simply pull them out of the soil by hand.

Eat later: Radish stir-fry with sugar snap peas

Recipe by Shirley Clark of Nutrition Connections and courtesy of UNH Cooperative Extension.

Serving size ¾ cup. Serves 8.

1 tablespoon. oil

1/2 cup shallots, diced

3 cups sugar snap peas, chopped

2 cups radishes, sliced

1/4 cup orange juice

2 tablespoons fresh dill, chopped

salt and pepper to taste

Wash your hands and fresh ingredients. Heat oil in large pan over medium heat. Add shallots and cook until soft, about 3 minutes. Add snap peas and cook 3 minutes. Add radishes and cook 3 more minutes. Stir. Add orange juice and dill. Add salt and pepper to taste. Mix well. Serve and enjoy. Refrigerate leftovers and use within 2 to 3 days.

Spinach

Plant now: Like peas, spinach is another cool-season vegetable you’d want to start planting now, according to Bernitz, and is another one he recommends planting successionally.

“Spinach is a great one to plant not only in the spring but also in the fall as well. Peas tend not to be great for the fall because they are a little slower to mature,” he said.

Watch them grow: Spinach will prefer shade over full sun and cooler temperatures over warm. In fact, Bernitz said spinach that has been exposed to a little bit of frost will change its overall taste.

“It tastes somewhat sweeter when exposed to some light frost and harvested in cooler temperatures,” Bernitz said.

Out to harvest: According to Bernitz, single leaves of spinach should be harvested as soon as they reach a usable size, at cool temperatures if possible. Spinach has a short shelf life, lasting just a few days in the refrigerator. It should be run under cold water and immediately refrigerated after harvest, he said.

Eat later: Spinach cooks very quickly and can go great when sauteed with other greens like collards and Swiss chard, on its own or added to dishes like scrambled eggs or soups.

Tomatoes

Plant now: If you have the space indoors, you can start planting tomatoes now. Otherwise, if you’re looking to plant seeds directly into the ground, those will need to wait a little bit longer.

“Tomatoes you don’t want to plant or transplant outdoors until the danger of frost has passed, because they will not tolerate frost,” Bernitz said. “They are veggies that people typically start growing indoors. … We recommend starting them from seed indoors under grow lights for about six to eight weeks before you transplant them out.”

Watch them grow: Tomatoes need a lot of room for their roots to grow, so if you are starting them indoors, Bernitz said, they need pots or containers at least five gallons in size.

Varieties of tomatoes are either determinate or indeterminate —‌ indeterminate varieties will continue producing new tomatoes throughout harvest season and until the threat of frost, which is normally around October but could return earlier or later than that, depending on the year and what part of the state you live in, according to Bernitz.

“Indeterminate tomatoes are common,” he said. “Determinate tomatoes are much shorter and bushier, and they produce all of their tomatoes at once, which is not really what some people like if they want to be enjoying fresh tomatoes off the vine all summer.”

Out to harvest: In general, Munroe said tomatoes can take around 60 to 75 days to be ready depending on their size, and there may be additional harvesting time depending on when the first fall frost occurs. Tomatoes should then be stored at room temperature, out of direct sunlight.

“Our seasons have been getting longer and longer,” he said. “We’ve been growing strong through the end of September, and even this past year we were a week or two into October.”

Bernitz said some tomato varieties will drop when ripe, whereas others will cling to the plant. Most will come off the plant easily when they are ripe or close to ripe.

Eat later: A fresh homegrown tomato can be eaten by itself, Bernitz said, or cooked alongside some homegrown basil or made into a sauce for meals like pastas. Frozen tomatoes will keep for about eight to 12 months.

Tree fruits

Apples, pears, plums, cherries and certain varieties of peaches grow well in southern New Hampshire.

Plant now: Fruit trees can be planted in the spring once the snow has completely melted and the soil is thoroughly dried and workable. The best way to start growing a fruit tree, according to Emma Erler, Commercial Horticulture Field Specialist for UNH Cooperative Extension, is to plant a “grafted” tree, a branch that’s taken from a parent plant and attached to its own root system. “You could certainly try to grow [a fruit tree] from seed, but you’re probably not going to end up with a very delicious fruit,” she said. To plant the grafted tree, dig a hole that is deep enough to accommodate the full height of the root system and wide enough to spread the roots out. “Ideally, the part of the stem that’s just above the roots will be sitting just above soil level,” Erler said. “You don’t want [the stem] of the plant to be covered by soil at all.”

Watch them grow: Fruit trees need direct sunlight — around six to eight hours of it a day — and a well-drained soil to thrive. “A shaded area or low-lying area where water tends to pool and form puddles is not the spot for them,” Erler said. “You want a nice, open, sunny spot where the soil can dry fairly quickly.” The young tree needs water — by rain, sprinkler or watering can — at least a couple times a week. Each watering should be enough to soak at least 8 to 12 inches down into the soil. “You want to make sure you aren’t just flooding the upper inch or so of soil,” Erler said. “You want to water enough so that if you were to dig into the soil near the plant you’d see the water.”

Out to harvest: The yield from fruit trees takes some patience, Erler said; you probably won’t see any quality fruit until the tree is at least 3 to 5 years old. “The tree needs to be structurally strong first, so it’s not likely to break under the weight of the fruit or from snow or ice,” she said. One of the biggest mistakes people make when planting fruit trees, Erler said, is trying to harvest the fruit prematurely. “It’s tough to do, but you should actually be removing any fruits that start growing during the first couple of years,” she said. “When the tree is producing fruit, it’s taking energy away from the growth of the roots and the tree.”

Eat later: Fruit crisp

Recipe by Christine Parshall, Nutrition Connections Teacher, and courtesy of UNH Cooperative Extension.

Serving size 1/2 cup. Serves 6.

4 cups fruit, like blueberries, pears, apples, peaches (frozen, canned or fresh)

2 tablespoons. white or whole wheat flour

1/3 cup packed brown sugar

1/2 cup whole wheat flour

1/2 cup oats

1/2 stick softened margarine or butter

3/4 teaspoon cinnamon

3/4 teaspoon nutmeg

Heat oven to 375 degrees. Wash hands with soap and water. Grease an 8 x 8 x 2-inch pan. If using canned fruit, drain juices and rinse. If using frozen fruit, thaw and drain. Scrub firm produce like apples and pears with a clean vegetable brush under running water. Gently rub tender produce, like peaches, under running water. Rinse fresh berries under running water. Slice fruit, if needed, and put in the pan. Add 2 tablespoons flour to fruit and stir in. Spread fruit evenly in pan. In a bowl, mix remaining ingredients together with a fork or hands until crumbly. Sprinkle over fruit evenly. Bake 30 to 40 minutes, or until topping is golden brown and fruit is tender when pierced with a fork. Serve warm.

Best of 2021

Let’s try something new.

As with every year, the Best of 2021 Hippo Readers Poll offers lots of ideas for new things to try: a new sandwich, a new restaurant for your date night, a new spot for your morning coffee, a new hike with the family, a new park to visit with your energetic dog. If you’re looking for new and different things to do this year, readers, who voted in our online survey in February, have oodles of suggestions for you.

And this year we’re giving you readers’ picks in a slightly new way. Instead of breaking out some of the categories by geography, we’re giving you the top five winners in most categories. All these “readers bests” mean extra recommendations for places to go and things to do (and eat).

A note about the information here: It’s always a good idea to call before you head out to see if that salon is open or if that restaurant has the dish you’re craving. Even as more things are returning to normal, schedules can still be in flux and some locations have registration and reservation procedures.

Looking for a quick hike this weekend? Or a new spot to grab some takeout for dinner? Let Hippo readers give you some recommendations for all the Bests our slice of New Hampshire has to offer.

ARTS

Best Performing Arts Venue

Best of the best: Palace Theatre, 80 Hanover St., Manchester, 668-5588, palacetheatre.org

  • Tupelo Music Hall, 10 A St., Derry, 437-5100, tupelohall.com –
  • Capitol Center for the Arts, 44 S. Main St., Concord, 225-1111, ccanh.com
  • Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion, 72 Meadowbrook Lane, Gilford, 293-4700, banknhpavilion.com
  • The Music Hall, 28 Chestnut St., and 131 Congress St., Portsmouth, 436-2400, themusichall.org

Best Drive-in Venue for Live Entertainment

Best of the best: Tupelo Music Hall, 10 A St., Derry, 437-5100, tupelohall.com

  • Milford Drive-In Theater, 531 Elm St., Milford, 673-4090, milforddrivein.com
  • Northlands (formerly known as Drive-In Live), Cheshire Fairground, 247 Monadnock Highway, Swanzey, northlandslive.com
  • Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion, 72 Meadowbrook Lane, Gilford, 293-4700, banknhpavilion.com
  • Weirs Drive-In Theater, 76 Endicott St. N., Weirs Beach, 366-4723, weirsdrivein.com

Best Virtual Performance

Best of the best: Palace Theatre, 80 Hanover St., Manchester, 668-5588, palacetheatre.org.

  • Tupelo Music Hall, 10 A St., Derry, 437-5100, tupelohall.com
  • Bob Marley, comedian, bmarley.com
  • Capitol Center for the Arts, 44 S. Main St., Concord, 225-1111, ccanh.com
  • Recycled Percussion, instrumental junk rock band, New Year’s Eve show, recycledpercussion.com

Best Place to View Art

Best of the best: Currier Museum of Art, 150 Ash St., Manchester, 669-6144, currier.org

  • League of NH Craftsmen Nashua Fine Craft Gallery, 98 Main St., Nashua, 595-8233, nashua.nhcrafts.org
  • Andres Institute of Art, 98 Route 13, Brookline, 673-8441, andresinstitute.org
  • ArtHub, 107 W. Pearl St., Nashua, 405-698-1951, nashuaarts.org
  • Area 23, 254 N. State St., Concord, 552-0137, thearea23.com

Best Place to Buy Art

Best of the best: League of NH Craftsmen Nashua Fine Craft Gallery, 98 Main St., Nashua, 595-8233, nashua.nhcrafts.org

  • Craftsmen’s Fair, nhcrafts.org. The nine-day craft fair, hosted by the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, normally takes place at Mount Sunapee Resort starting the first week of August.
  • Greeley Park Art Show, nashuaarts.org. The outdoor art show, hosted by the Nashua Area Artists Association, is held every summer in Greeley Park (100 Concord St., Nashua).
  • League of New Hampshire Craftsmen Concord Gallery, 36 N. Main St., Concord, 228-8171, concord.nhcrafts.org
  • Concord Arts Market, 1 Bicentennial Square, Concord, concordartsmarket.net. The juried outdoor artisan and fine art market normally runs weekly on Saturdays from June through September.

ENTERTAINMENT & NIGHTLIFE

Best Bookstore or Comic Book Store

Best of the best: Gibson’s Bookstore, 45 S. Main St., Concord, 224-0562, gibsonsbookstore.com

  • The Bookery, 844 Elm St., Manchester, 836-6600, bookerymht.com
  • The Toadstool Bookshop, Somerset Plaza, 375 Amherst St., Nashua, 673-1734, toadbooks.com
  • Double Midnight Comics, 245 Maple St., Manchester, 669-9636, dmcomics.com
  • Water Street Bookstore, 125 Water St., Exeter, 778-9731, waterstreetbooks.com

Community Event You’re Most Looking Forward To

  • Best of the best: Market Days Festival, Concord, intownconcord.org. A three-day street festival, hosted by Intown Concord, featuring shopping, games and live entertainment on Main Street. Normally held in June.
  • Intown Taco Tour, Manchester, intownmanchester.com. An annual street festival organized by Intown Manchester in May. Restaurants create and sell their own unique tacos, and attendees vote on their favorites.
  • Winter Holiday Stroll, Nashua, downtownnashua.org. A holiday event, presented by Great American Downtown, featuring live music, food, holiday shopping, a candlelight stroll and a tree-lighting ceremony downtown. Normally held the Saturday after Thanksgiving.
  • Milford Pumpkin Fest, milfordpumpkinfestival.org. Features giant pumpkins, craft fairs, talent shows, fireworks and a haunted trail in downtown Milford. Normally held on Columbus Day weekend.
  • Deerfield Fair, Deerfield Fairgrounds, deerfieldfair.com. One of the largest and most well-attended agricultural fairs in New Hampshire, with carnival rides, live entertainment, food and more. Normally held in September.

Best Bar for Live Music

Best of the best: The Shaskeen Pub and Restaurant, 909 Elm St., Manchester, 625-0246, shaskeenirishpub.com

  • Area 23, 254 N. State St., Concord, 552-0137, thearea23.com
  • The Derryfield Restaurant, 625 Mammoth Road, Manchester, 623-2880, thederryfield.com
  • The Stumble Inn Bar & Grill, 20 Rockingham Road, Londonderry, 432-3210, stumbleinnnh.com
  • Murphy’s Taproom, 494 Elm St., Manchester, 644-3535, murphystaproom.com

Best Bar With an Outdoor Deck

Best of the best: Murphy’s Taproom, 494 Elm St., Manchester, 644-3535, murphystaproom.com

  • Penuche’s Ale House, 4 Canal St., Nashua, 595-9831, penuchesalehouse.com
  • Backyard Brewery & Kitchen, 1211 S. Mammoth Road, Manchester, 623-3545, backyardbrewerynh.com
  • Fody’s Great American Tavern, 187 Rockingham Road, Derry, 404-6946, fodystavern.com
  • The Pasta Loft Restaurant, 241 Union Square, Milford, 672-2270, pastaloft.com.

Best Sports Bar

Best of the best: Billy’s Sports Bar & Grill, 34 Tarrytown Road, Manchester, 622-3644, billys-sports-bar-grill.business.site

  • The River Casino & Sports Bar, 53 High St., Nashua, 881-9060, therivercasino.com
  • The Thirsty Moose Taphouse, 360 Daniel Webster Hwy., Merrimack, 670-0270, thirstymoosetaphouse.com
  • The Draft Sports Bar and Grill, 67 S. Main St., Concord, 227-1175, draftsportsbar.com
  • The Thirsty Moose Taphouse, 795 Elm St., Manchester, 792-2337, thirstymoosetaphouse.com

Best Sports Book

Best of the best: Filotimo Casino & Restaurant, 279 S. Willow St., Manchester, 668-6591, filotimocasino.com

The Brook, 319 New Zealand Road, Seabrook, 474-3065, livefreeandplay.com

RESTAURANTS

Best Restaurant

Best of the best: Copper Door Restaurant, 15 Leavy Dr., Bedford, 488-2677, copperdoor.com (The Copper Door Restaurant also has a location in Salem.)

  • The Puritan Backroom, 245 Hooksett Road, Manchester, 669-6890, puritanbackroom.com
  • Buckley’s Great Steaks, 438 Daniel Webster Hwy., Merrimack, 424-0995, buckleysgreatsteaks.com
  • The Tuckaway Tavern & Butchery, 58 Route 27, Raymond, 244-2431, thetuckaway.com
  • Mint Bistro, 1105 Elm St., Manchester, 625-6468, mintbistro.com

Best New Eatery

Best of the best: bluAqua Restrobar, 930 Elm St., Manchester, 836-3970, bluaquarestrobar.com. A “restrobar,” according to bluAqua owner Scott Forrester, is a downtown gastropub offering quality food and cocktails with a little Southern flair. The Lubbock, Texas, native opened this eatery in downtown Manchester in early 2020, offering Southern-inspired items like chicken and andouille gumbo, seared sesame tuna, and shrimp and grits, in addition to burgers, sandwiches, tacos and more.

  • White Birch Eatery, 571 Mast Road, Goffstown, 836-6849, whitebircheatery.com. Offering breakfast and lunch seven days a week, the White Birch Eatery features a menu of small plates, bowls, sandwiches and toasts, all with fresh, seasonal ingredients.
  • Tomahawk Tavern & Butchery, 454 Daniel Webster Hwy., Merrimack, 365-4960, tomahawktavern.com. This deli and restaurant has quickly become a favorite in Merrimack for its marinated meats, burgers, hot and cold subs, and selection of Boar’s Head meats and cheeses.
  • Col’s Kitchen, 55 S. Main St., Concord, 227-6778, colsplantbased.com. Col’s Kitchen is a plant-based restaurant that opened its doors in mid-August 2020, featuring a well-rounded menu of appetizers, sandwiches, entrees, brunch options and desserts. The eatery also makes a variety of its own vegan sauces, which owner Jordan Reynolds said he hopes to begin bottling soon.
  • Diz’s Cafe, 860 Elm St., Manchester, 606-2532, dizscafe.com. Longtime chef and Manchester native Gary “Diz” Window opened Diz’s Cafe, his first restaurant as owner, in May 2020. Diz’s Cafe offers scratch-made comfort foods and home-cooked meals, including customizable “build-your-own” menus of at least one protein and up to three fresh sides.

Best Fine Dining

Best of the best: Hanover Street Chophouse, 149 Hanover St., Manchester, 644-2467, hanoverstreetchophouse.com

  • Copper Door Restaurant, 15 Leavy Dr., Bedford, 488-2677, copperdoor.com (The Copper Door Restaurant also has a location in Salem.)
  • Bedford Village Inn & Restaurant, 2 Olde Bedford Way, Bedford, 472-2001, bedfordvillageinn.com
  • Buckley’s Great Steaks, 438 Daniel Webster Hwy., Merrimack, 424-0995, buckleysgreatsteaks.com
  • Cotton Restaurant, 75 Arms St., Manchester, 622-5488, cottonfood.com

Best Diner

Best of the best: The Red Arrow Diner, 61 Lowell St., Manchester, 626-1118, redarrowdiner.com (The Red Arrow Diner also has locations in Concord, Londonderry and Nashua.)

  • MaryAnn’s Diner, 29 E. Broadway, Derry, 434-5785, maryannsdiner.com (MaryAnn’s Diner also has locations in Windham and Salem.)
  • Airport Diner, 2280 Brown Ave., Manchester, 623-5040, thecman.com/airport-diner
  • The Red Arrow Diner, 137 Rockingham Road, Londonderry, 552-3651, redarrowdiner.com (The Red Arrow Diner also has locations in Manchester, Concord and Nashua.)
  • The Red Arrow Diner, 112 Loudon Road, Concord, 415-0444, redarrowdiner.com (The Red Arrow Diner also has locations in Manchester, Londonderry and Nashua.)

Best Seafood Restaurant

Best of the best: Surf Restaurant, 207 Main St., Nashua, 595-9293, surfseafood.com (Surf also has a location in Portsmouth.)

  • The Lobster Boat, 453 Daniel Webster Hwy., Merrimack, 424-5221, lobsterboatrestaurant.com (The Lobster Boat also has a location in Litchfield.)
  • Petey’s Summertime Seafood & Bar, 1323 Ocean Blvd., Rye, 433-1937, peteys.com
  • The Beach Plum, 3 Brickyard Square, Epping, 679-3200, thebeachplum.net (The Beach Plum also has locations in Portsmouth and North Hampton. A fourth location is due to open in Salem this spring.)
  • Hooked Seafood Restaurant, 110 Hanover St., Manchester, 606-1189, hookedonignite.com

Best Pub

Best of the best: The Shaskeen Pub and Restaurant, 909 Elm St., Manchester, 625-0246, shaskeenirishpub.com

  • The Peddler’s Daughter, 48 Main St., Nashua, 821-7535, thepeddlersdaughter.com
  • Strange Brew Tavern, 88 Market St., Manchester, 666-4292, strangebrewtavern.net
  • The Barley House Restaurant & Tavern, 132 N. Main St., Concord, 228-6363, thebarleyhouse.com
  • The Wild Rover Pub, 21 Kosciuszko St., Manchester, 669-7722, wildroverpub.com

DELICIOUS DISHES

Best Dish or Drink You Had in the Last Year

Best of the best: Fried Oreos at Union Street Takeout, 90 Union St., Manchester, 260-7663. The deep-fried Oreos are among several sweet treats available at this takeout-only eatery, along with brownies, cookies and chocolate or peanut butter fudge.

  • Loaded chicken tenders at The River Casino & Sports Bar, 53 High St., Nashua, 881-9060, therivercasino.com. A customer favorite, these hand-battered chicken tenders are tossed in a sweet chili sauce and topped with cheese, bacon and scallions.
  • Chili at Union Street Takeout, 90 Union St., Manchester, 260-7663. Chili is available on multiple menu items here, including by itself with bread and butter, as well as on a hot dog, a cheeseburger or an order of chili cheese fries.
  • Chicken Francaise at Stella Blu, 70 E. Pearl St., Nashua, 578-5557, stellablu-nh.com. This dish features chicken breast floured and egged, cooked in olive oil and butter, over angel hair pasta, topped with garlic butter cream sauce and served with green beans.
  • Poutine at New England’s Tap House Grille, 1292 Hooksett Road, Hooksett, 782-5137, taphousenh.com. The Tap House poutine has hand-cut fries that are topped with cheese curds, a peppercorn demi-glace, Parmesan cheese and fresh rosemary before being finished off with a spray of white truffle oil.

Best Barbecue

Best of the best: KC’s Rib Shack, 837 Second St., Manchester, 627-7427, ribshack.net

  • Smokehaus Barbecue, 278 Route 101, Amherst, 249-5734, smokehausbbq.com
  • Smokeshow Barbeque, 89 Fort Eddy Road, Concord, 227-6399, smokeshowbarbeque.com
  • Georgia’s Northside, 394 N. State St., Concord, 715-9189, georgiasnorthside.com
  • Goody Cole’s Smokehouse and Catering Co., 374 Route 125, Brentwood, 679-8898, goodycoles.com

Best Breakfast

Best of the best: Tucker’s, 80 South St., Concord, 413-5884, tuckersnh.com (Tucker’s also has locations in Hooksett, Dover, Merrimack, New London and a sixth location that’s due to open in Bedford this summer.)

  • Purple Finch Cafe, 124 S. River Road, Bedford, 232-1953, purplefinchcafe.com
  • Tucker’s, 1328 Hooksett Road, Hooksett, 206-5757, tuckersnh.com (Tucker’s also has locations in Concord, Dover, Merrimack, New London and a sixth location that’s due to open in Bedford this summer.)
  • Tucker’s, 360 Daniel Webster Hwy., Merrimack, 413-6477, tuckersnh.com (Tucker’s also has locations in Concord, Hooksett, Dover, New London and a sixth location that’s due to open in Bedford this summer.)
  • Janie’s Uncommon Cafe, 123 Nashua Road, Londonderry, 432-3100, janiescafe.com

Best Breakfast Dish

Best of the best: Sedona skillet at Tucker’s, 80 South St., Concord, 413-5884, tuckersnh.com. The dish features three local eggs scrambled with onions, pepper jack cheese and piquante peppers over crispy hash browns, and topped with guacamole, Southwest seasoning and a chipotle aioli drizzle. (Tucker’s also has locations in Hooksett, Dover, Merrimack, New London and a sixth location that’s due to open in Bedford this summer.)

  • Banana nut bread French toast at Tucker’s, 360 Daniel Webster Hwy., Merrimack, 413-6477, tuckersnh.com. This freshly baked banana nut bread is grilled in French toast batter and then topped with bananas, maple glazed walnuts, whipped cream and powdered sugar. (Tucker’s also has locations in Concord, Hooksett, Dover, New London and a sixth location that’s due to open in Bedford this summer.)
  • Crepes at Chez Vachon, 136 Kelley St., Manchester, 625-9660, find them on Facebook. Crepes are made to order at this longtime West Side staple, with a variety of sweet and savory fillings available.
  • Pancake boards at the Purple Finch Cafe, 124 S. River Road, Bedford, 232-1953, purplefinchcafe.com. Depending on the time of year, you’ll find all kinds of seasonally themed pancake boards featuring eight pancakes and a variety of fun toppings per order.
  • Compost Heap at The Riverhouse Cafe, 167 Union Square, Milford, 249-5556, damngoodgrub.com/riverhousecafe. One of The Riverhouse Cafe’s many signature creations, the Compost Heap features roasted veggies, Monterey Jack cheese and tomato between two cheesy hash browns, topped with two eggs, organic pea shoots, avocado and salsa verde.

Best Burgers

Best of the best: The Barley House Restaurant & Tavern, 132 N. Main St., Concord, 228-6363, thebarleyhouse.com

  • New England’s Tap House Grille, 1292 Hooksett Road, Hooksett, 782-5137, taphousenh.com
  • Vibes Gourmet Burgers, 25 S. Main St., Concord, 856-8671, vibesgourmetburgers.com
  • The Tuckaway Tavern & Butchery, 58 Route 27, Raymond, 244-2431, thetuckaway.com
  • The Crown Tavern, 99 Hanover St., Manchester, 218-3132, thecrownonhanover.com

Best Fish & Chips

Best of the best: The Lobster Boat, 453 Daniel Webster Hwy., Merrimack, 424-5221, lobsterboatrestaurant.com (The Lobster Boat also has a location in Litchfield.)

  • The Peddler’s Daughter, 48 Main St., Nashua, 821-7535, thepeddlersdaughter.com
  • The Barley House Restaurant & Tavern, 132 N. Main St., Concord, 228-6363, thebarleyhouse.com
  • Goldenrod Restaurant Drive-In, 1681 Candia Road, Manchester, 623-9469, goldenrodrestaurant.com
  • Petey’s Summertime Seafood & Bar, 1323 Ocean Blvd., Rye, 433-1937, peteys.com

Best Mac & Cheese

Best of the best: Mr. Mac’s Macaroni & Cheese, 497 Hooksett Road, Manchester, 606-1760, mr-macs.com (Mr. Mac’s also has locations in Portsmouth and in Tyngsboro, Mass., and Westford, Mass.)

  • Pressed Cafe, 108 Spit Brook Road, Nashua, 718-1250; 3 Cotton Road, Nashua, 402-1003 (the Cotton Road location is drive-thru only; Pressed Cafe also has locations in Burlington, Mass., and Newton, Mass.)
  • Stella Blu, 70 E. Pearl St., Nashua, 578-5557, stellablu-nh.com
  • The Tuckaway Tavern & Butchery, 58 Route 27, Raymond, 244-2431, thetuckaway.com
  • O Steaks & Seafood, 11 S. Main St., Concord, 856-7925, osteaksconcord.com (O Steaks & Seafood also has a location in Laconia.)

Best Pizza

Best of the best: 900 Degrees Neapolitan Pizzeria, 50 Dow St., Manchester, 641-0900, 900degrees.com

  • Alley Cat Pizzeria, 486 Chestnut St., Manchester, 669-4533, alleycatpizzerianh.com
  • Constantly Pizza, 39 S. Main St., Concord, 224-9366, constantlypizza.net (Constantly Pizza also has a location in Penacook.)
  • Sal’s Pizza, 80 Storrs St., Concord, 226-0297, sals-pizza.com (Sal’s Pizza also has locations in Derry, Hampton, Hooksett, Laconia, Manchester, Merrimack and Milford and several others in Massachusetts.)
  • Vintage Pizza, 241 Candia Road, Manchester, 518-7800, vintagepizzanh.com

Best Sandwich

Best of the best: Steak and cheese special at Union Street Takeout, 90 Union St., Manchester, 260-7663. You can get a steak and cheese sub with peppers and onions here, or order it as a special with bacon, mayonnaise and other toppings like lettuce, tomatoes and pickles.

  • The Garden at the Nashua Garden, 121 Main St., Nashua, 886-7363, find them on Facebook @thenashuagarden603. This vegetarian sandwich features tomato, cucumber, olives, bell peppers, pickles, onion, lettuce and sprouts.
  • Steak and cheese sub at Sub Station, 1292 Hooksett Road, Hooksett, 625-1800, substationhooksett.com. Featuring custom-blended shaved steak with either melted American or provolone cheese, this sub can be customized even further by adding teriyaki or barbecue sauce.
  • Roast beef sandwich at Bentley’s Roast Beef, 134 Route 101A, Amherst, 883-2020, bentleysroastbeef.com. Bentley’s uses grain-fed Midwestern beef for its sandwiches, which are available in multiple sizes on toasted sesame or onion rolls, or on Syrian bread.
  • CBC at T-Bones Great American Eatery, 25 S. River Road, Bedford, 641-6100; 39 Crystal Ave., Derry, 434-3200; 77 Lowell Road, Hudson, 882-6677; t-bones.com. The CBC features fried chicken, cheddar cheese, bacon, lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise on a toasted bun. (The Bedford, Derry and Hudson T-Bones locations all received votes in this category for the CBC, but you can also get this sandwich at the locations in Concord, Laconia and Salem.)

Best Subs

Best of the best: Nadeau’s Subs, 776 Mast Road, Manchester, 623-9315; 100 Cahill Ave., Manchester, 669-7827; 673 Hooksett Road, Manchester, 644-8888; 1095 Hanover St., Manchester, 606-4411; nadeaus.com (Nadeau’s Subs also has a fifth location in Exeter and a sixth location that opened inside McLaughlin’s Country Market in Concord in January 2021.)

  • Bill Cahill’s Super Subs, 8 Kimball Hill Road, Hudson, 882-7710, find them on Facebook @billcahills
  • USA Subs, 66 Crystal Ave., Derry, 437-1550, usasubs.com
  • Sub Station, 1292 Hooksett Road, Hooksett, 625-1800, substationhooksett.com
  • Union Street Takeout, 90 Union St., Manchester, 260-7663

Best Tacos

Best of the best: Dos Amigos Burritos, 26 N. Main St., Concord, 410-4161, dosamigosburritos.com (Dos Amigos Burritos also has a location in Portsmouth, and a third location in Dover under the name “Dos Mexican Eats.”)

  • B’s Tacos, nhtacotruck.com (Find their food truck outside the BP Gas Station at 2 Mohawk Drive in Londonderry every Tuesday through Saturday, from May to October. B’s Tacos also opened a brick-and-mortar location at 372 Kelley St. in Manchester in January 2021.)
  • La Carreta Mexican Restaurant, 545 Hooksett Road, Manchester, 628-6899; 1875 S. Willow St., Manchester, 623-7705; lacarretamex.com (with locations in Derry, Londonderry, Nashua and Portsmouth.)
  • La Carreta Mexican Restaurant, 44 Nashua Road, Londonderry, 965-3477, lacarretamex.com (with locations in Manchester, Derry, Nashua and Portsmouth.)
  • California Burritos Mexican Grill, 101 Factory St., Nashua, 718-8745; 2 Cellu Drive, Nashua, 417-6151; californiaburritosnh.com (California Burritos Mexican Grill also has locations in Hudson and Manchester.)

Restaurant That Can Make You Love Vegetables

  • Best of the best: Troy’s Fresh Kitchen & Juice Bar, 4 Orchard View Drive, Unit 6, Londonderry, 965-3411, troysfreshkitchen.com
  • Col’s Kitchen, 55 S. Main St., Concord, 227-6778, colsplantbased.com
  • Republic Cafe, 969 Elm St., 666-3723, republiccafe.com (Republic Cafe is currently operating under the same roof as its sister restaurant, Campo Enoteca, at 969 Elm St. in Manchester.)
  • Stella Blu, 70 E. Pearl St., Nashua, 578-5557, stellablu-nh.com
  • Green Elephant Vegetarian Bistro & Bar, 35 Portwalk Place, Portsmouth, 427-8344, greenelephantnh.com

SWEET TREATS

Best Bakery

Best of the best: Bearded Baking Co., 819 Union St., Manchester, 647-7150, beardedbaking.com

  • The Crust & Crumb Baking Co., 126 N. Main St., Concord, 219-0763, thecrustandcrumb.com
  • Buckley’s Bakery & Cafe, 436 Daniel Webster Hwy., Merrimack, 262-5929, buckleysbakerycafe.com (Buckley’s also has a second location, known as Buckley’s Market & Cafe, in Hollis.)
  • Klemm’s Bakery, 29 Indian Rock Road, Windham, 437-8810, klemmsbakery.com
  • Bread & Chocolate, 29 S. Main St., Concord, 228-3330, find them on Facebook @breadandchocolateconcordnh

Best Candy or Chocolate Shop

Best of the best: Granite State Candy Shoppe, 13 Warren St., Concord, 225-2591, granitestatecandyshoppe.com (Granite State Candy Shoppe also has a location in Manchester.)

  • Van Otis Chocolates, 341 Elm St., Manchester, 627-1611, vanotis.com
  • Nelson’s Candy and Music, 65 Main St., Wilton, 654-5030, nelsonscandymusic.com
  • Granite State Candy Shoppe, 832 Elm St., Manchester, 218-3885, granitestatecandyshoppe.com (Granite State Candy Shoppe also has a location in Concord.)
  • Dancing Lion Chocolate, 917 Elm St., Manchester, 625-4043, dancinglion.us

Best Doughnuts

Best of the best: Klemm’s Bakery, 29 Indian Rock Road, Windham, 437-8810, klemmsbakery.com

  • Brothers Donuts, 426 Central St., Franklin, 934-6678, find them on Facebook @brothersdonuts
  • New Hampshire Doughnut Co., 2 Capital Plaza, Concord, 715-5097, nhdoughnutco.com (New Hampshire Doughnut Co. also has a location in Chichester.)
  • Crosby Bakery, 51 E. Pearl St., Nashua, 882-1851, crosbybakerynh.com
  • The Local Moose Cafe, 124 Queen City Ave., Manchester, 232-2669, thelocalmoosecafe.com

Best Ice Cream

Best of the best: Hayward’s Homemade Ice Cream, 7 Daniel Webster Hwy., Nashua, 888-4663, haywardsicecream.com (Hayward’s also has a location in Merrimack.)

  • Moo’s Place Ice Cream, 27 Crystal Ave., Derry, 425-0100, moosplace.com (Moo’s Place also has a location in Salem.)
  • Goldenrod Restaurant Drive-In, 1681 Candia Road, Manchester, 623-9469, goldenrodrestaurant.com
  • The Puritan Backroom, 245 Hooksett Road, Manchester, 669-6890, puritanbackroom.com
  • The Inside Scoop, 260 Wallace Road, Bedford, 471-7009, theinsidescoopnh.com

DRINKS

Best Beer Selection at a Retail Store

Best of the best: Bert’s Better Beers, 545 Hooksett Road, Manchester, 413-5992, bertsbetterbeers.com

  • The Beer Store, 433 Amherst St., Nashua, 889-2242, thebeerstorenh.com
  • The Packie, 581 Second St., Manchester, 232-1236, thepackienh.com (The Packie moved from South Willow Street to its current space in the Second Street Shoppes plaza in June 2020.)
  • Local Baskit, 10 Ferry St., Suite 120A, Concord, 219-0882, localbaskit.com
  • Lazy Dog Beer Shoppe, 27 Buttrick Road, Suite B4, Londonderry, 434-2500, lazydogbeer.com

Best NH Brewery

Best of the best: 603 Brewery, 42 Main St., Londonderry, 404-6123, 603brewery.com

  • Able Ebenezer Brewing Co., 31 Columbia Circle, Merrimack, 844-223-2253, ableebenezer.com
  • Backyard Brewery & Kitchen, 1211 S. Mammoth Road, Manchester, 623-3545, backyardbrewerynh.com
  • Concord Craft Brewing, 117 Storrs St., Concord, 856-7625, concordcraftbrewing.com
  • Pipe Dream Brewing, 49 Harvey Road, Londonderry, 404-0751, pipedreambrewingnh.com

Best NH-made Beer Variety

Best of the best: Safe Space New England IPA (Concord Craft Brewing, 117 Storrs St., Concord, 856-7625, concordcraftbrewing.com)

  • Misguided Angel New England IPA (Lithermans Limited Brewery, 126 Hall St., Unit B, Concord, 219-0784, lithermans.beer)
  • Burn The Ships Cherrywood Smoked IPA (Able Ebenezer Brewing Co., 31 Columbia Circle, Merrimack, 844-223-2253, ableebenezer.com)
  • Victory Nor Defeat Double IPA (Able Ebenezer Brewing Co., 31 Columbia Circle, Merrimack, 844-223-2253, ableebenezer.com)
  • Winni Amber Ale (603 Brewery, 42 Main St., Londonderry, 404-6123, 603brewery.com)

Best NH-made Cider and Mead

Best of the best: Ancient Fire Mead & Cider, 8030 S. Willow St., Building 1, Unit 7-2, Manchester, 203-4223, ancientfirewines.com

  • Moonlight Meadery, 23 Londonderry Road, No. 17, Londonderry, 216-2162, moonlightmeadery.com
  • Contoocook Cider Co. (Gould Hill Farm), 656 Gould Hill Road, Contoocook, 746-1175, contoocookcider.com
  • North Country Hard Cider, 3 Front St., No. 160, Rollinsford, 834-9915, northcountryhardcider.com
  • Sap House Meadery, 6 Folsom Road, Ossipee, 539-1672, saphousemeadery.com

Best NH Winery

Best of the best: LaBelle Winery, 345 Route 101, Amherst, 672-9898, labellewinerynh.com (LaBelle Winery also has a location in Portsmouth. Another location featuring an onsite restaurant and retail marketplace is due to open in Derry later this year.)

  • Zorvino Vineyards, 226 Main St., Sandown, 887-8463, zorvino.com
  • Ancient Fire Mead & Cider, 8030 S. Willow St., Building 1, Unit 7-2, Manchester, 203-4223, ancientfirewines.com
  • Flag Hill Distillery & Winery, 297 N. River Road, Lee, 659-2949, flaghill.com
  • Fulchino Vineyard, 187 Pine Hill Road, Hollis, 438-5984, fulchinovineyard.com

Where They Make Your Coffee Perfect Every Time

Best of the best: Revelstoke Coffee, 100 N. Main St., Concord, revelstokecoffee.com

  • Hometown Coffee Roasters, 80 Old Granite St., Manchester, 703-2321, hometownroasters.com
  • A&E Coffee & Tea, 135 Route 101A, Amherst, 578-3338, aeroastery.com (A&E Coffee & Tea also has a cafe location in Manchester and a wholesale roastery in Nashua.)
  • Flight Coffee Co., 30 Harvey Road, Bedford, 836-6228, flightcoffeeco.com
  • Cafe la Reine, 915 Elm St., Manchester, 232-0332, cafe-la-reine.square.site

EATING OUTDOORS & FOOD TO-GO

Best Restaurant to Get Takeout From

Best of the best: The Puritan Backroom, 245 Hooksett Road, Manchester, 669-6890, puritanbackroom.com

  • Troy’s Fresh Kitchen & Juice Bar, 4 Orchard View Drive, Unit 6, Londonderry, 965-3411, troysfreshkitchen.com
  • Union Street Takeout, 90 Union St., Manchester, 260-7663
  • Georgia’s Northside, 394 N. State St., Concord, 715-9189, georgiasnorthside.com
  • Lilac Blossom, 385 E. Dunstable Road, Nashua, 888-9588; 650 Amherst St., Nashua, 886-8420; lilacblossom.us

Best Food Truck

Best of the best: B’s Tacos (nhtacotruck.com) Find them outside the BP Gas Station (2 Mohawk Drive, Londonderry) every Tuesday through Saturday, from May to October. B’s Tacos also opened a brick-and-mortar location at 372 Kelley St. in Manchester in January 2021.

  • Up In Your Grill (upinyourgrill.com) Follow them on Facebook @upinyourgrill for their most up-to-date schedule. The barbecue trailer regularly appears at Vault Motor Storage (526 Daniel Webster Hwy., Merrimack) and also provides catering services.
  • Smoke N’ Butts BBQ (smokenbuttsbbq.com) Find them outside The Farmer’s Wife (20 Main St., Candia) on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, beginning April 9. The barbecue trailer has also appeared at several local events and provides catering services for small parties.
  • The Hungry Caterpillar (find them on Facebook @thehungrycaterpillarnh) This plant-based food truck regularly posts its weekly schedule on social media, but is most often found every Wednesday through Saturday at 45 Danville Road in Hampstead.
  • The Food Abides (find them on Facebook) The truck is currently closed for the season, but will regularly post updates on its whereabouts on social media. Last year, it was a regular visitor of Lithermans Limited Brewery (126 Hall St., Unit B, Concord).

Restaurant with the Best Outdoor Seating

Best of the best: Downtown Cheers Grille & Bar, 17 Depot St., Concord, 228-0180, cheersnh.com

  • The Crown Tavern, 99 Hanover St., Manchester, 218-3132, thecrownonhanover.com
  • Backyard Brewery & Kitchen, 1211 S. Mammoth Road, Manchester, 623-3545, backyardbrewerynh.com
  • 603 Brewery, 42 Main St., Londonderry, 404-6123, 603brewery.com
  • Copper Door Restaurant, 15 Leavy Drive, Bedford, 488-2677, copperdoor.com (The Copper Door Restaurant also has a location in Salem.)

Best Farmers Market

Best of the best: Concord Farmers Market (concordfarmersmarket.com) Held on Saturdays, from 8:30 a.m. to noon, on Capitol Street in Concord (near the Statehouse), from May to October. The 2021 market is tentatively set to begin on Saturday, May 1.

  • Bedford Farmers Market (bedfordfarmersmarketnh.org) Held on Tuesdays from 3 to 6 p.m. in the parking lot of Wicked Good Butchah (formerly the Harvest Market) at 209 Route 101 in Bedford. The market is due to return on June 15 and will continue weekly after that until the middle of October.
  • Nashua Farmers Market (downtownnashua.org/local) Held on Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the grounds of City Hall at 229 Main St. in Nashua. The market is usually held from mid-June to mid-October. 2021 market dates TBA.
  • Salem Farmers Market (salemnhfarmersmarket.org) Held on Sundays from 10 a.m. to noon inside the former Rockler Woodworking building (369 S. Broadway, Salem). The year-round market, which normally operates indoors from November through about April or May, moved into its current spot in January 2021.
  • Derry Homegrown Farm & Artisan Market (derryhomegrown.org) After taking a one-year hiatus last year due to Covid-19 concerns, the Derry Homegrown Farm & Artisan Market will return on June 2 at 1 W. Broadway in Derry, where it will be held on Wednesdays from 3 to 7 p.m. through the end of September.

OUTDOOR FUN

Best Farm for Pick-Your-Own

Best of the best: Sunnycrest Farm, 59 High Range Road, Londonderry, 432-7753, sunnycrestfarmnh.com. Pick-your-own opportunities include apples, strawberries, blueberries and cherries.

Mack’s Apples, 230 Mammoth Road, Londonderry, 432-3456, macksapples.com. Pick-your-own opportunities include apples and pumpkins.

Lull Farm, 65 Broad St., Hollis, 465-7079, livefreeandfarm.com. Pick-your-own opportunities include strawberries, apples and pumpkins. (Lull Farm also has a seasonal farm in Milford.)

Brookdale Fruit Farm, 41 Broad St., Hollis, 465-2240, brookdalefruitfarm.com. Pick-your-own opportunities include strawberries, cherries, blueberries, raspberries, black raspberries, blackberries, apples and pumpkins.

Carter Hill Orchard, 73 Carter Hill Road, 225-2625, carterhillapples.com. Pick-your-own opportunities include peaches, blueberries and apples.

Best City Park

Best of the best: Benson Park, 19 Kimball Road, Hudson, 886-6000, hudsonnh.gov. Originally a private zoo and amusement park, Benson Park reopened in 2010 as a town park for recreational use and is now a popular spot for hiking, dog walking, fishing and picnicking.

  • White Park, 1 White St., Concord, 225-8690, concordnh.gov. Amenities include a basketball court, a seasonal pool, walking trails and an ice skating rink.
  • Greeley Park, 100 Concord St., Nashua, 589-3370, nashuanh.gov. Amenities include baseball and softball fields, a playground, picnic areas, walking trails and a tennis court.
  • Livingston Park, 156 Hooksett Road, Manchester, 624-6444, manchesternh.gov. Amenities include walking trails around Dorrs Pond, as well as a baseball diamond, a running track and two playgrounds.
  • Mine Falls Park, Whipple Street, Nashua, 589-3370, nashuanh.gov. This 325-acre park features eight miles of walking trails, forest, open fields and wetlands.

Best State Park

Best of the best: Bear Brook State Park, 61 Deerfield Road, Allenstown, 485-9874, nhstatesparks.org/visit/state-parks/bear-brook-state-park. The largest developed state park in New Hampshire, Bear Brook State Park is 10,000 acres and features more than 40 miles of trails. Activities include biking, hiking, swimming, camping and fishing.

  • Hampton Beach State Park, 160 Ocean Blvd., Hampton, 926-8990, nhstateparks.org/visit/state-parks/hampton-beach-state-park. Activities include swimming, fishing, picnicking and RV camping.
  • Pawtuckaway State Park, 7 Pawtuckaway Road, Nottingham, 895-3031, nhstateparks.org/visit/state-parks/pawtuckaway-state-park. This park features more than 5,000 acres of land and trails with a variety of landscapes.
  • Wellington State Park, 614 W. Shore Road, Bristol, 744-2197, nhstateparks.org/visit/state-parks/wellington-state-park. Wellington State Park offers hiking trails, picnic areas and volleyball and horseshoe courts, and is also known for having the largest freshwater swimming beach in the New Hampshire state park system.
  • Odiorne Point State Park, 570 Ocean Blvd., Rye, 436-7406, nhstateparks.org/visit/state-parks/odiorne-point-state-park. This park offers gorgeous views of the Atlantic Ocean and also features the Seacoast Science Center.

Best Campground

Best of the best: White Lake State Park, 94 State Park Road, Tamworth, 323-7350, nhstateparks.org/visit/state-parks/white-lake-state-park

  • Pawtuckaway State Park, 7 Pawtuckaway Road, Nottingham, 895-3031, nhstateparks.org/visit/state-parks/pawtuckaway-state-park
  • Danforth Bay Camping & RV Resort, 196 Shawtown Road, Freedom, 539-2069, danforthbay.com
  • Moose Hillock Camping Resort, 96 Batchelder Brook Road, Warren, 764-5294, moosehillock.com
  • Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park Camp Resort, 111 Mi-Te-Jo Road, Milton, 652-9022, lakesregionjellystone.com

Best Bike Trail

Best of the best: Nashua River Rail Trail, Nashua. This 12.5-mile trail roughly follows the Nashua River, passing through Nashua and several neighboring towns in Massachusetts.

  • Goffstown Rail Trail, Goffstown, goffstownrailtrail.org. The trail runs for more than seven miles from Goffstown to Manchester.
  • Londonderry Rail Trail, Londonderry, londonderrytrails.org. About six miles of this trail runs through North Londonderry.
  • Windham Rail Trail, Windham, windhamrailtrail.org. The Windham Rail Trail is 4.1 miles and is a core part of the longest paved abandoned rail bed in the Granite State, as the Windham, Derry and Salem rail trails collectively run about 11 miles.
  • Mine Falls Park, Whipple Street, Nashua, 589-3370, nashuanh.gov. This 325-acre park features about eight miles of trails.

Best Hike in Southern New Hampshire

Best of the best: Mount Monadnock, Jaffrey/Dublin, 532-8862, nhstateparks.org/visit/state-parks/monadnock-state-park. The 3,165-foot mountain features more than 35 hiking trails of various levels of difficulty leading to the summit.

  • Pack Monadnock, Miller State Park, 13 Miller Park Road, Peterborough, 924-3672, nhstateparks.org/visit/state-parks/miller-state-park. The oldest state park in New Hampshire, Miller State Park features three hiking trails and a 1.3-mile paved, driveable road to the 2,290-foot summit.
  • Mount Major, Alton, blog.nhstateparks.org/mt-major-family-friendly-hike. This 1,785-foot peak offers panoramic views of Lake Winnipesaukee.
  • Mount Uncanoonuc Trails, Mountain Road, Goffstown. The North Uncanoonuc Trail, about a 0.6-mile hike, is steep in some spots and is known for its wilderness and panoramic views of Goffstown. The South Uncanoonuc Trail is slightly longer (about 0.8 miles) and is a snowmobiling and ATVing trail that features views of Mount Monadnock from a distance.
  • Mine Falls Park, Whipple Street, Nashua, 589-3370, nashuanh.gov. This 325-acre park features eight miles of walking trails, forest, open fields and wetlands.

Best Spot for a Mini Hike

Best of the best: Mine Falls Park, Whipple Street, Nashua, 589-3370, nashuanh.gov. This 325-acre park features eight miles of walking trails, forest, open fields and wetlands.

  • Marjory Swope Park, Long Pond Road, Concord, 225-8815, concordnh.gov. Named in 2012 after Marjory Swope, longtime executive director of the New Hampshire Association of Conservation Commissions, this 77-acre park near Long Pond in Concord features a nearly two-mile trail loop that offers great views of Penacook Lake.
  • Lake Massabesic, Manchester, 624-6482, manchesternh.gov/departments/water-works/lake-massabesic-watershed. Dozens of trails are available for walking, jogging and hiking.
  • Beaver Brook Association, 117 Ridge Road, Hollis, 465-7787, beaverbrook.org. The Beaver Brook Association features more than 35 miles of trails across more than 2,000 acres of forest, fields and wetlands within the towns of Hollis, Brookline and Milford.
  • Livingston Park, 156 Hooksett Road, Manchester, 624-6444, manchesternh.gov. Numerous trails for hiking are available in the area; one of them circles the pond, which opens for fishing in the summer months and public ice skating in the winter months.

Best Spot for a Long Run

Best of the best: Mine Falls Park, Whipple Street, Nashua, 589-3370, nashuanh.gov. This 325-acre park features eight miles of walking trails, forest, open fields and wetlands.

  • Goffstown Rail Trail, Goffstown, goffstownrailtrail.org. The trail runs for more than seven miles from Goffstown to Manchester.
  • Londonderry Rail Trail, Londonderry, londonderrytrails.org. About six miles of this trail runs through North Londonderry.
  • Nashua River Rail Trail, Nashua. This 12.5-mile trail roughly follows the Nashua River, passing through Nashua and several neighboring towns in Massachusetts.
  • Lake Massabesic, Manchester, 624-6482, manchesternh.gov/departments/water-works/lake-massabesic-watershed. Dozens of trails are available for running and jogging.

Best Lake to Canoe or Kayak

Best of the best: Lake Massabesic, Manchester, 624-6482, manchesternh.gov/departments/water-works/lake-massabesic-watershed

  • Newfound Lake, Wellington State Park, 614 W. Shore Road, Bristol, 744-2197, nhstateparks.org/visit/state-parks/wellington-state-park
  • Lake Winnipesaukee, lakewinnipesaukee.net
  • Pawtuckaway State Park, 7 Pawtuckaway Road, Nottingham, 895-3031, nhstateparks.org/visit/state-parks/pawtuckaway-state-park
  • Lake Sunapee, Mount Sunapee State Park, 86 Beach Access Road, Newbury, 763-5561, nhstateparks.org/visit/state-parks/mt-sunapee-state-park

Best Route for a Motorcycle Ride

Best of the best: Kancamagus Highway, kancamagushighway.com. A 34.5-mile scenic ride from Lincoln to Conway along New Hampshire’s Route 112.

  • New Hampshire Route 31. A 56-mile state highway crossing several towns in southwestern New Hampshire.
  • New Hampshire Route 107. A 69-mile state highway connecting Laconia in the Lakes Region with Seabrook on the coast, its northernmost area near Lake Winnipesaukee.
  • New Hampshire Route 1A on the Seacoast, or the Coastal Byway, visit-newhampshire.com/seacoast/scenic drives. An 18.4-mile drive along New Hampshire’s coast through Portsmouth, Rye and Seabrook.
  • New Hampshire Route 13. A 43-mile state highway running from Brookline to Concord.

Best Off-Roading Trail

Best of the best: Jericho Mountain State Park, 298 Jericho Lake Road, Berlin, 752-4758, nhstateparks.org/visit/state-parks/jericho-mountain-state-park. The trails at Jericho Mountain State Park are currently closed to OHRV use for mud season but may reopen in late May, depending on the weather and trail conditions

  • Pittsburg, greatnorthwoodsridersatv.org. Most of the Great North Woods Riders ATV Club’s trails are located on 8,000 acres of the Perry Stream Land and Timber Co. property in Pittsburg. The only allowed travel on Route 3 is from Cheese Factory Road to the Murphy Dam.
  • The state’s trails (visit nhstateparks.org for a map of permitted OHRV trails)

Best Ski Hill

Best of the best: Pats Peak Ski Area, 686 Flanders Road, Henniker, 428-3245, patspeak.com

  • Loon Mountain, 60 Loon Mountain Road, Lincoln, 800-229-5666, loonmtn.com
  • Gunstock Mountain Resort, 719 Cherry Valley Road, Gilford, 293-4341, gunstock.com
  • Bretton Woods, 99 Ski Area Road, Bretton Woods, 278-3320, brettonwoods.com
  • Cannon Mountain Ski Area, 260 Tramway Drive, Franconia, 823-8800, cannonmt.com

Best Spot for Cross-Country Skiing

Best of the best: Jackson XC, 153 Main St., Jackson, 383-9355, jacksonxc.org

  • Beaver Meadow Golf Course, 1 Beaver Meadow Drive, Concord, 228-8954, concordnh.gov
  • White Farm, 144 Clinton St., Concord, 271-3241, concordnh.gov
  • Bretton Woods, 99 Ski Area Road, Bretton Woods, 278-3320, brettonwoods.com
  • Gunstock Mountain Resort, 719 Cherry Valley Road, Gilford, 293-4341, gunstock.com

Best Snowmobile Trail

Best of the best: Pittsburg, pittsburgridgerunners.org. Trail reports in Pittsburg are posted on the Pittsburg Ridge Runners Snowmobile Club’s website.

  • Lake Massabesic, Manchester, snowmobile-nh.com. The Southern New Hampshire Snow Slickers posts information on trail status in this area on its website.
  • Belmont, belmontbogiebusters.org. Trail reports in Belmont are posted on the Belmont Bogie Busters Snowmobile Club’s website.
  • Bow, bowpioneers.org. Trail conditions and maps are available on the Bow Pioneers Snowmobile Club’s website.

Home & Garden

Best Car Repair

Best of the best: Merrimack Auto Center, 9 Webb Drive, Merrimack, 216-9596; 150 Amherst St., Nashua, 546-0157, merrimackautocenterllc.com

  • Duncan’s European Automotive, 3 Liberty Drive, Londonderry, 434-5796, duncansauto.com
  • Weed Family Automotive, 124 Storrs St., Concord, 225-7988, weedfamilyautomotive.com
  • Gurney’s Automotive Repair, 83 Broad St., Nashua, 886-5800, gurneysautomotive.com
  • Ron’s Toy Shop, 235 Elm St., Manchester, 669-9682, ronstoyshop.com

Best Garden Center or Nursery

Best of the best: House by the Side of the Road, 370 Gibbons Highway, Wilton, 654-9888, housebythesideoftheroad.com

  • Demers Garden Center, 656 S. Mammoth Road, Manchester, 625-8298, demersgardencenter.com
  • Cole Gardens, 430 Loudon Road, Concord, 229-0655, colegardens.com
  • Lake Street Garden Center, 37 Lake St., Salem, 893-5858, lakestreet.com
  • Bedford Fields Home & Garden Center, 331 Route 101, Bedford, 472-8880, bedfordfields.com

BEAUTY, WELLNESS & FASHION

Best Barbershop

Best of the best: South Mane Barbershop, 28 S Main St., 1B, Concord, 952-2202, southmanebarbershop.com

  • The Polished Man, 707 Milford Road, Merrimack, 718-8427, thepolishedman.com
  • Lucky’s Barbershop and Shave Parlor, 50 S. State St., Concord, 715-5470, luckysbarbershop.biz.
  • HomeGrown Barber Co., 18 Orchard View Drive, Londonderry, 818-8989, homegrownbarber.com
  • Blank Canvas Salon, 1F Commons Drive, No. 38, Londonderry, 818-4294, blankcanvassalon.com

Best Independent Clothing and/or Shoe Store

Best of the best: Alec’s Shoes, 1617 Southwood Drive, Nashua, 882-6811, alecs-shoes.com

  • Gondwana & Divine Clothing Co., 13 N. Main St., Concord, 228-1101, clothingnh.com
  • Joe King’s Shoe Shop, 45 N. Main St., Concord, 225-6012, joekings.com
  • Alapage, 25 S. River Road, Bedford, 622-0550, alapageboutique.com
  • Camaraderie Boutique, 175 Main St., Nashua, 402-1908, camaraderiestyle.com

Best Jewelry Shop

Best of the best: Bellman Jewelers, 1650 Elm St., Manchester, 625-4653, bellmans.com

  • Capitol Craftsman Romance Jewelers, 16 & 18 N. Main St., Concord, 224-6166, capitolcraftsman.com
  • Scontsas Fine Jewelry & Home Decor, 169-173 Main St., Nashua, 882-3281, scontsas.com
  • Jonathan’s Jewelers, 460 Route 101, Bedford, 471-2828, jonathansjewelers.com
  • Princess Jewelers, 55 Crystal Ave., Derry, 537-9605, princessnh.com

Best Second Hand Shop

Best of the best: Mother & Child Clothing and Gifts, 135 Route 101A, Amherst, 886-6727, mothersays.shoprw.com

  • Lilise Designer Resale, 7 N. Main St., Concord, 715-2009, liliseresale.com
  • OutFITters Thrift Store, 394 Second St., Manchester, 641-6691, outfittersnh.org
  • Hilltop Consignment Gallery, 56 N. Main St., Concord, 856-0110, hilltopconsignmentgallery.com
  • Corey’s Closet, 1329 Hooksett Road, Hooksett, 722-2712, coreyscloset.org

Best Salon

Best of the best: Blank Canvas Salon, 1F Commons Drive, No. 38, Londonderry, 818-4294, blankcanvassalon.com

  • 5 Diamond Salon, 915 Holt Ave., Suite 4, Manchester, 459-3367, 5diamondsalon.com
  • Color Trends Hair Salon, 25 Merrit Parkway, Nashua, 880-7504, colortrendshairsalon.com
  • Salon North, 102 Bay St., Manchester, 483-3011, 102salonnorth.com
  • Advanced Hair Etc., 61 Crystal Ave., Derry, 425-2262, advancedhairderry.com

Best Spa

Best of the best: Renew MediSpa, 23 B Crystal Ave., Derry, 932-4701, renewmedispa.com

  • Pellé Medical Spa, 159 Frontage Road, Manchester, 627-7000, pellemedicalspa.com
  • Serendipity Day Spa & Float Studio, 23 Sheep Davis Road, Pembroke, 229-0400, serendipitydayspa.com
  • Innovations Salon & Spa, 228 Naticook Road, Merrimack, 880-7499, innovationsnh.com
  • The Skin & Body Spa, 385 E. Dunstable Road, Nashua, 888-7900, theskinandbodyspa.com

Best Workout Space

Best of the best: Get Fit NH, 41 Terrill Park Drive, Concord, 344-2651, getfitnh.com

  • SPENGA, 493 Amherst St., Nashua, 324-0355, spenganashua.com
  • Strive Indoor Cycling, 10 Hills Ave., Concord, 513-9464, striveindoorcycling.com
  • Executive Health & Sports Center, 1 Highlander Way, Manchester, 668-4753, ehsc.com
  • New Hampshire Power Yoga, 704 Milford Road, Merrimack, 594-2494, nhpoweryoga.com

KIDS

Best Place to Take Kids

Best of the best: Aviation Museum of New Hampshire, 27 Navigator Road, Londonderry, 669-4820, nhahs.org. Museum dedicated to the science, technology, history and culture of aviation, with interactive exhibits and educational programs.

SEE Science Center, 200 Bedford St., Manchester, 669-0400, see-sciencecenter.org. Museum focused on technology, engineering, mathematics and more with interactive exhibits, demonstrations and educational programs.

  • Cowabunga’s, 725 Huse Road, Manchester, 935-9659, mycowabungas.com. Indoor inflatable playground and party venue.
  • Benson Park, 19 Kimball Road, Hudson, 886-6000, hudsonnh.gov
  • Livingston Park, 156 Hooksett Road, Manchester, 624-6444, manchesternh.gov

Best Outdoor Spot to Let Kids Run Around and Be Crazy

Best of the best: Livingston Park, 156 Hooksett Road, Manchester, 624-6444, manchesternh.gov

  • White Park, 1 White St., Concord, 225-8690, concordnh.gov
  • Benson Park, 19 Kimball Road, Hudson, 886-6000, hudsonnh.gov
  • Greeley Park, 100 Concord St., Nashua, 589-3370, nashuanh.gov
  • Hampton Beach, Hampton, hamptonbeach.org

Best Kids Summer Day Camp

Best of the best: YMCA of Greater Nashua’s Camp Sargent, 141 Camp Sargent Road, Merrimack, 880-4845, campsargent.org

  • Melody Pines Day Camp, 510 Corning Road, Manchester, 669-9414, melodypines.com
  • Granite YMCA, Allard Center of Goffstown, 116 Goffstown Back Road, Goffstown, 497-4663, graniteymca.org/locations/allard-center-of-goffstown
  • Boys & Girls Club of Manchester’s Camp Foster, 36 Camp Allen Road, Bedford, 625-5031, begreatmanchester.org
  • Executive Health & Sports Center, 1 Highlander Way, Manchester, 668-4753, ehsc.com

Pets

Best Doggie Day Care

Best of the best: Woof Woof Daycare & Boarding, 47 Rockingham Road, Windham, 890-6239, woofwoof.net. In addition to day care, boarding and grooming services for dogs of all breeds, this family-owned and -operated company offers classes in pet first aid and CPR, as well as in basic or intermediate obedience training.

  • All Dogs Gym & Inn, 505 Sheffield Road, Manchester, 669-4644, alldogsgym.com. Founded in 1993 by dog trainer, behavioral consultant and author Gail Fisher, All Dogs Gym & Inn is a full-service training center and activity center for dogs, with services that include boarding, day care, grooming, training and dog sports classes.
  • American K9 Country, 336 Route 101, Amherst, 672-8448, americank9country.com. American K9 Country, which celebrated its 18th year in business last month, offers a doggie day care center, a full-service grooming salon, boarding for both dogs and cats, a dog park and more.
  • Chewie’s Playland, 472 Amherst St., Nashua, 921-1875; 217 W. Hollis St., Nashua, 921-0745; chewiesplayland.com. With two locations in the Gate City, Chewie’s Playland offers a variety of services for dogs, including day care, boarding, grooming and both indoor and outdoor play areas with plenty of toys.
  • Bark City, 259 Hanover St., Manchester, 227-5248, barkcitynh.com. Bark City, which opened in 2017, features a day care facility with grooming services and a boutique retail store carrying top toy brands, all-natural snacks and treats.

Best Dog Groomer

Best of the best: Grooming at Tiffany’s, 127 Rockingham Road, Derry, 432-8000, groomingattiffanys.com. Grooming at Tiffany’s offers a variety of crate-free appointment or walk-in services for both dogs and cats.

  • Sarah’s Paw Spa, 16 Manning St., Derry, 512-4539, sarahspawspa.com. Established in 2017, Sarah’s Paw Spa offers a variety of grooming services for dogs, with several special add-on services ranging from flea and tick shampoos to teeth brushing and nail painting.
  • WAG Grooming Salon & Spa, 15 Ermer Road, Suite 108, Salem, 328-5530, wagplace.com. WAG arrived in early 2019 and continues to provide a variety of grooming and styling services for both dogs and cats.
  • Ruff to Fluff Dog Grrrooming, 1238 Hooksett Road, Hooksett, 669-1955, rufftofluff.com. Ruff to Fluff offers both quick-fix and full-service grooms, which include bath, brush and blow dry services.
  • Hollywood Hounds Pet Spa, 250 Wallace Road, Bedford, 472-7387, hollywoodhoundsnh.com. Hollywood Hounds, which opened in 2006, offers grooming services to dogs and cats of all breeds, as well as hydrosurge bathing, flea and tick removal and emergency de-skunking.

Best Place to Let Your Dog Go Off Leash

  • Hudson Dog Park at Benson Park, 19 Kimball Hill Road, Hudson, 886-6000, hudsonnh.gov/bensonpark/page/dog-park. The Hudson Dog Park, which opened on the grounds of Benson Park in Hudson in the fall of 2012, features two separate areas for large and small dogs. Dog waste bags are available.
  • Concord Dog Park at Terrill Park, Old Turnpike Road, Concord, 225-8690, concordnh.gov/facilities/facility/details/Terrill-Park-28. This 21-acre park is maintained by the Pope Memorial SPCA and features groomed trails and fenced in areas for dogs of all breeds.
  • Derry Dog Park, Fordway and Transfer Lane, Derry, 432-6136, derrynh.org/animal-control/pages/derry-dog-park. This dog park is completely fenced in with a double gate to enter, featuring separate areas for larger and smaller dogs.
  • Merrimack Dog Park at Wasserman Park, 116 Naticook Road, Merrimack, 882-1046, merrimackparksandrec.org/merrimack-dog-park. This ¾-acre-sized dog park is divided into separate sections for larger and smaller dogs.

Best On-Leash Dog Outing

Best of the best: Mine Falls Park, Whipple Street, Nashua, 589-3370, nashuanh.gov. This 325-acre park features eight miles of walking trails, forest, open fields and wetlands.

  • Benson Park, 19 Kimball Road, Hudson, 886-6000, hudsonnh.gov. Originally a private zoo and amusement park, Benson Park reopened in 2010 as a town park for recreational use and is now a popular spot for hiking, dog walking, fishing and picnicking.
  • Livingston Park, 156 Hooksett Road, Manchester, 624-6444, manchesternh.gov. Amenities include walking trails around Dorrs Pond as well as a baseball diamond, a running track and two playgrounds.
  • Windham Rail Trail, Windham, windhamrailtrail.org. The Windham Rail Trail is 4.1 miles and is a core part of the longest paved abandoned rail bed in the Granite State, as the Windham, Derry and Salem rail trails collectively run about 11 miles.
  • Beaver Brook Association, 117 Ridge Road, Hollis, 465-7787, beaverbrook.org. The Beaver Brook Association features more than 35 miles of trails across more than 2,000 acres of forest, fields and wetlands within the towns of Hollis, Brookline and Milford.

PERSONALITIES

Most Innovative Chef

Best of the best: Troy Ward Jr., Troy’s Fresh Kitchen & Juice Bar, 4 Orchard View Drive, Unit 6, Londonderry, 965-3411, troysfreshkitchen.com

  • Bobby Marcotte, The Tuckaway Tavern & Butchery, 58 Route 27, Raymond, 244-2431, thetuckaway.com
  • Nicki Leavitt, Purple Finch Cafe, 124 S. River Road, Bedford, 232-1953, purplefinchcafe.com
  • Michael Buckley, Surf Restaurant, 207 Main St., Nashua, 595-9293, surfseafood.com (Surf also has a location in Portsmouth.)
  • Corey Fletcher, Revival Kitchen & Bar, 11 Depot St., Concord, 715-5723, revivalkitchennh.com

Restaurant with the Friendliest Staff

Best of the best: Troy’s Fresh Kitchen & Juice Bar, 4 Orchard View Drive, Unit 6, Londonderry, 965-3411, troysfreshkitchen.com

  • Union Street Takeout, 90 Union St., Manchester, 260-7663
  • Purple Finch Cafe, 124 S. River Road, Bedford, 232-1953, purplefinchcafe.com
  • The River Casino & Sports Bar, 53 High St., Nashua, 881-9060, therivercasino.com
  • Stella Blu, 70 E. Pearl St., Nashua, 578-5557, stellablu-nh.com

Butt-kicking-est Fitness Instructor

Best of the best: Meagan Sbat, Get Fit NH, 41 Terrill Park Drive, Concord, 344-2651, getfitnh.com

  • Mary Peace, SPENGA, 493 Amherst St., Nashua, 324-0355, spenganashua.com
  • Lauren Pino, SPENGA, 493 Amherst St., Nashua, 324-0355, spenganashua.com
  • Meagan Ferns, Strive Indoor Cycling, 10 Hills Ave., Concord, 513-9464, striveindoorcycling.com
  • Courtney Giddis, Strive Indoor Cycling, 10 Hills Ave., Concord, 513-9464, striveindoorcycling.com

Best Barber

Best of the best: AJ Caron, South Mane Barbershop, 28 S Main St., 1B, Concord, 952-2202, southmanebarbershop.com

  • Joey Daniels, South Mane Barbershop, 28 S Main St., 1B, Concord, 952-2202, southmanebarbershop.com
  • Traci Pettengill Tooky, Village Barber Shop, 12 Maple St., Contoocook, 746-2170, tookyvillagebarbershop.business.site
  • Rick Lindof, The Polished Man, 707 Milford Road, Merrimack, 718-8427, thepolishedman.com
  • Rafael Robles, Lineup Barbershop, 1271 Hooksett Road, Hooksett, 218-3294, lineupbarbershop.com

Best Hair Stylist

Best of the best: Samantha Courtois, 5 Diamond Salon, 915 Holt Ave., Suite 4, Manchester, 459-3367, 5diamondsalon.com

  • Kate Kwasniak, Blank Canvas Salon, 1F Commons Drive, No. 38, Londonderry, 818-4294, blankcanvassalon.com
  • Tashia Landry, Salon North, 102 Bay St., Manchester, 483-3011, 102salonnorth.com
  • Ashley Hastings, Blank Canvas Salon, 1F Commons Drive, No. 38, Londonderry, 818-4294, blankcanvassalon.com
  • Corrie Thayer, Color Trends Hair Salon, 25 Merrit Parkway, Nashua, 880-7504, colortrendshairsalon.com

Friendliest Dentist

Best of the best: Dr. Elizabeth & Victoria Spindel Rubin, Spindel General and Cosmetic Dentistry, 862 Union St., Manchester, 669-9049, elizabethspindel.com

  • Dr. John Patrick Ahern, Ahern, Nichols, Hersey & Butterfield Family & Preventive Dentistry, 30 Pinkerton St., Derry, 432-5039, ahern-nichols.com
  • Dr. Ray Orzechowski, 280 Pleasant St., Concord, 228-4456, rayorzechowski.com
  • Dr. Charles Pipilas, 280 Main St., Suite 311, Nashua, 881-8280
  • Dr. Joseph Sheehan, 155 Dow St., Suite 401, Manchester, 623-0641

Friendliest Mechanic

Best of the best: Chad Tanguay, Merrimack Auto Center, 9 Webb Drive, Merrimack, 216-9596; 150 Amherst St., Nashua, 546-0157, merrimackautocenterllc.com

  • Ralph Brutus, Brutus Auto Repair & Service, 148 Merrimack St., Manchester, 624-8881, brutusauto.com
  • Dan Weed, Weed Family Automotive, 124 Storrs St., Concord, 225-7988, weedfamilyautomotive.com
  • Chuck Nelson, P&N Automotive Services, 140 Pleasant St., Concord, 225-4313, pandnauto.com
  • Justin Lemay, Bandit OffRoad, 51 Kosciuszko St., Manchester, 624-0400, banditoffroad.com

Best Local Music Act

Best of the best: Chad LaMarsh, chadlamarsh.com. Chicago born and Berklee trained, the singer-guitarist calls Boston home, but he’s a Granite State favorite and perennial opener for Recycled Percussion whenever they’re in town.

  • Alli Beaudry, allibeaudry.com. She’s a Manchester native and Berklee alum (and instructor) whose bedazzled keyboard, infectious smile and sweet singing voice make Beaudry a local treasure.
  • Lucas Gallo, lucasgallomusic.com. Along with his talents as a singer, songwriter and guitarist, Gallo is a Concord booster, booking as well as playing shows in his hometown.
  • Brad Bosse, facebook.com/bradbossemusic. A ubiquitous presence on the music scene, Milford native Bosse possesses a voluminous catalog of cover songs and boundless energy.
  • Kevin Horan, kevinhoranmusic.com. The talented guitarist and drummer lives in Manchester and also performs with the Stone Road Band.

Best Comedian Who Lives Local-ishly

Best of the best: Bob Marley, bmarley.com. Marley is a Maine native who went west to seek fame many years ago, only to return quickly and find it at home riffing on the region’s many funny foibles.

  • Juston McKinney, justonmckinney.com. Having spent time as a Portsmouth police officer before he became a comic, one of the state’s most beloved, McKinney still lives on the Seacoast.
  • Nick Lavallee. Manchester’s own polymath, Lavallee does standup, plays in power pop rock band Donaher, and makes custom action figures under his Wicked Joyful brand.
  • Paul Landwehr, paullandwehr.com. He’s a Manchester native who cut his teeth at the weekly comedy gathering in Shaskeen Pub’s backroom, graduating to bigger stages and a solid regional reputation.
  • Jimmy Dunn, jimmydunn.com. Dunn made a name for himself in Boston and on enough cruise ships to write a book called Boat Hack. He now lives in Hampton Beach, where he hosts a must-see comedy festival every summer.

LIVING HERE

Coolest Free Historic Site or Monument

Best of the best: Stark Park, 650 River Road, Manchester, starkpark.com. Dedicated to New Hampshire’s Gen. John Stark, who penned the state motto, “Live Free or Die,” in 1809. The 30-acre plot was once the Stark Family farm and contains the original Stark Family burial plot.

  • New Hampshire Statehouse, 107 N. Main St., Concord, 271-2154, gencourt.state.nh.us/nh_visitorcenter/default.htm. The oldest state capitol in the country in which both houses of the legislature meet in their original chambers. Features tours, exhibits and a gift shop.
  • The Old Man of the Mountain. A series of cliff ledges resembling the profile of a man’s face that was a popular tourist attraction at Franconia Notch State Park until its collapse in May 2003. In 2011, the Old Man of the Mountain Legacy Fund created The Old Man of the Mountain Profile Plaza, with seven steel “profilers” that recreate the Old Man’s visage. Also at the State Park are museums with history, photos and stories of the Old Man. Visit cannonmt.com/things-to-do/activities/old-man-of-the-mountain.
  • Amoskeag Millyard, between Commercial and Bedford streets, Manchester, 622-7531, manchesterhistoric.org. Site of Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. from 1831 to 1936. The textile factory complex was the largest in New England.
  • Saint-Gaudens National Historical Park, 139 St. Gaudens Road, Cornish, 675-2175, nps.gov/saga. Features the preserved home, gardens, studios and works of American sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens. The plot was Saint-Gaudens’ summer residence from 1885 to 1897. The park grounds, gardens, outdoor monuments and trails are open now during daylight hours for no cost. The Visitor Center and all historic buildings are currently closed for the season and will reopen in May.

Thing NH Does Better Than Anyone Else

Best of the best: Live free or die.

  • Everything!
  • No sales tax.
  • Maple syrup.
  • Outdoor activities.

Best Thing We Forgot to Ask About

Best of the best: Best Jams and Jellies: Laurel Hill Jams & Jellies, 47 Birchwood Circle, Bedford, 472-5388, laurelhilljams.com. A producer of dozens of jams and jellies made by hand in small batches from local fruits, wines and teas, Laurel Hill Jams & Jellies gets its name from the area of Bedford where owner and founder Sue Stretch lives. Formerly the president of the Bedford Farmers Market, Stretch was also a teacher for 41 years before retiring in the mid-2000s to focus on her business. She makes fruit jams like strawberry rhubarb, blueberry and red raspberry, plus jellies like apple cider, Asian pear, Concord grape and heirloom apple, and tea jellies, like chamomile tea and chai tea. You can order her products online or find them at several local stores, like Lull Farm in Hollis, Trombly Gardens in Milford, Grasshoppers Garden Center in New Boston and Bedford Fields Home & Garden Center.

  • Best Distillery: Steadfast Spirits Distilling Co., 134 Hall St., Unit H, Concord, 333-2162, steadfastspiritsdistilling.square.site. Steadfast Spirits officially opened its doors in early 2020 as the first licensed liquor manufacturer in the city of Concord. Its signature moonshine — Trouble’s Moonshine, named after owner and head distiller Charles “CJ” Lundergan, who is known by some as “Trouble” — is made with all natural ingredients and comes in a variety of flavors, like maple, vanilla, honey and cinnamon. Moonshine-mixed Trouble’s cocktails are also available, like Strawberry Smash, Citrus Squeeze and Apple Pie.
  • Best Gourmet Food to Go/Specialty Food Service: Local Baskit, 10 Ferry St., Suite 120A, Concord, 219-0882, localbaskit.com. Local Baskit was born when owner Beth Richards, an early adopter of the meal kit concept around the year 2013, began working toward creating a business plan integrating New Hampshire farms and other local businesses. In late 2016 she started working out of Genuine Local, a shared commercial kitchen in Meredith, and appeared at local farmers markets to gauge public feedback for the concept. She opened a storefront in Concord early the following year. Local Baskit has since expanded into offering craft beer and small gourmet food items, as well its meal kit delivery radius across southern New Hampshire.
  • Best Physical Therapist: Elite Rehab & Sports Therapy, 380 Daniel Webster Hwy., Suite H, Merrimack, 262-3305, eliterehabsports.com. Elite is a therapist-owned outpatient physical therapy practice, providing individual treatment plans to clients based on their own goals. It’s affiliated with several local universities and youth sports leagues, and offers a variety of services, from home exercise programs to injury prevention and wellness.
  • Best Massage Therapist: Bethany Chabot, LMT, 444 Hands, 36 Baboosic Lake Road, Merrimack, 834-2758, 444hands.com. Certified massage therapist Bethany Chabot has been working out of Family Chiropractic of Merrimack and Wellness Center in Merrimack since 2007 — in 2020, her practice was rebranded under the name 444 Hands. She is a 1999 Keene State College graduate, later going on to attend McIntosh College in Dover and completing her certificate for Massage Therapy and Bodywork.

This story was possible with the generous financial support of Hippo readers. Hippo is very grateful to have the support of its readers. If you haven’t contributed yet, please consider a small contribution. Your contributions allow Hippo to write more stories and gets you access to additional stories and columns. 

The Fine Print
This survey is for entertainment purposes only and all results are final.

The results of Hippo’s readers poll are based on readers’ answers to a poll conducted online in February. Readers typed in the names of people and locations they voted for. In situations where the vote is tied or otherwise unclear, Hippo editorial staff makes an effort to determine the will of the greatest number of voters. Hippo reserves the right to disqualify individual votes, ballots and/or entries when they are incomplete or unclear, do not meet the letter or the spirit of the question asked or otherwise do not meet the requirements to make them a usable vote.

Hippo’s editorial staff makes the ultimate determination of the winners in the categories. Hippo’s advertising staff and its advertisers play no role in the determination of the winners. All results are final.

The Best of 2021 is a celebration of all things local and is meant to serve as a snapshot of the people and places in southern New Hampshire. Large national and international chains are, for the most part, not included in the count.

Questions, Comments, Concerns
Did we get an address or phone number wrong? Do you have an idea for a new category? Let us know. Contact editor Amy Diaz at adiaz@hippopress.com. Corrections will appear on the first page of the news section in future issues. Is your favorite category missing? Categories change regularly, with some categories taking a sabbatical and new categories introduced, so please send your suggestions for a category for next year. And, again, all results are final.

Tasting tour

Take a mini day trip and discover new flavors at New Hampshire wineries

Whether you know (or think you know) everything there is to know about wine, or your wine experience is limited to the glass of Champagne you had at your cousin’s wedding, tastings are a great way to experience local wines, learn about how they’re made and the best foods to pair them with, and explore the vineyards that are occupying more and more New Hampshire real estate.

“People come for a tasting for something [fun] to do,” said Al Fulchino, owner and winemaker at Fulchino Vineyard in Hollis. “When they find out they like the wine, they think, how [is that made] in New Hampshire?”

Local winemakers and vineyard staff answer our questions about their wineries, their tasting experiences and the wines they think you should try.

Appolo Vineyards

49 Lawrence Road, Derry
421-4675, appolovineyards.com

Photo courtesy of Appolo Vineyards.

Mike Appolo, owner and winegrower, talks about his vineyard, the outdoor tasting room known as #thecrushpad, and Firefly 2020.

From fruit to wine: We make only grape wines. We are focused on food-friendly wines, so you will not find anything overly sweet here — well, except for our port-style wine, and that has some special pairing recommendations. We have a small vineyard [with 1,500 vines] in Derry with nearly a dozen named varieties of grapes. We also source grapes from all over New Hampshire, New York and other places. We make a variety of wines from dry to sweet, red, white and rosé. We have still and sparkling wines, including a brand new naturally fermented pet-nat [called Wild Eyes] and a red pinot noir bubbly [called Barchetta]. Many of our fermentations are done using native yeasts that bring out the best of the varietal character of the grapes we choose. We were one of the first in New England to grow the grape Brianna, which is now grown extensively in Vermont and in vineyards across the region. We offer still and sparkling versions of this wine. We are constantly experimenting with new grape varieties and trying new styles of wine.

What makes us unique: We have an outside tasting room, #thecrushpad, a patio in the middle of our sustainably grown vineyard. We have fire pits groups can reserve in spring and summer. Dogs are welcome on our patio as well. As one of the closest vineyards to Boston and Interstate 93, we see many visitors getting away for the weekend.

The tasting experience: Our staff will guide you through a tasting of anything from our menu of [often 15] wines, including both sparkling and still wines. The staff is well-versed in how each wine is made. When the winemaking staff is available, we will meet with customers to talk about the process.

Popular pours: Firefly 2020 is our newest sparkling Brianna white wine and is quickly gaining ground as our most popular at the winery. The sparkling Bee Wild 2019 white blend is right up there with it. Blue Eyes [sauvignon blanc] is our best selling wine in the New Hampshire Liquor and Wine Outlets. Red One [a sweet sangria-like New Hampshire red blend] is our most popular wine in Market Basket stores throughout the state.

Personal favorite: Firefly is my new favorite. I love the way the Brianna vines and grapes grow here — expressing the minerality of the granite-filled soils. We don’t spray this grape or use pesticides anywhere near it. I have had Brianna wine grown in at least five states and at various places across this state. The grapes here are very different, and my preference.

Appolo opened on March 13 for the new season. Current hours are Fridays from 2 to 8 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., by reservation only (visit the website to book online or call for same-day reservations). The winery is also in the approval process for a new outdoor covered tasting space and an indoor tasting room that Appolo says he hopes to start building in late spring, with expanded hours upon its completion.

Copper Beech Winery

146 Londonderry Turnpike, Building 3, Unit 23, Hooksett
400-2595, copperbeechwinery.com

Photo courtesy of Copper Beech Winery.

Lin L’Heureux owns and runs Copper Beech Winery on her own, which means she’s also the chief fruit selector, winemaker, lab chemist, taste tester, director of bottling, web designer, social media manager, photographer, advertising manager, hostess, server, groundskeeper, gardener and more.

From fruit to wine: Copper Beech Winery is a small batch woman-owned boutique winery. … We make … wines from fresh fruit and grapes that are grown as locally as possible and choose organic fruits whenever we can. Each small batch is hand crafted with patience and attention to detail. … We opened our tasting room in March 2014.

What makes us unique: While many fruit wines are sweet, ours are on the dry side, with just enough residual sweetness to showcase the fruit character without overwhelming it. Yes, dry fruit wines, a pleasant surprise for many of our customers. In 2021 we’ll be adding some well-aged grape wines as well. Our wines are fermented in the traditional style and most are aged at least a year before bottling.

The tasting experience: Normally we have about 14 types of wines available, which vary throughout the year. When a local farmer has a smaller supply of fruit available due to a bad winter, lack of rain, etc., we may run out of that wine earlier in the year. … We appreciate the local fruit when it’s available to us, and because I grew up on a farm, I really like the opportunity to help support local farmers. Our tasting room is small and cozy. … I love talking to people about how the wine is made, where the fruit comes from and what’s new in the tanks. This year, we’re working on approvals for an outside tasting and seating area and hope to open it later in the spring.

Popular pours: These tend to sell out early every year: Autumn Harvest [a blend of New Hampshire apples with tart red cranberries]; Brilliant Cranberry; Country Crabapple [a limited-edition wine crafted from New Hampshire crabapples]; Massabesic Rose [made with locally grown strawberries and fresh rhubarb]; and Wild Blue [a dry oak-aged red wine made with low-bush blueberries from New Hampshire and Maine].

Personal favorite: I honestly don’t have a favorite, but in the cooler seasons I tend to gravitate toward the reds, like Wild Blue or Regatta Red. In warmer seasons, I like a chilled white wine, like Fresh Peach or Country Crabapple.

Copper Beech Winery is opening later this spring; visit its website for details and hours for wine tastings and tours.

Crazy Cat Winery

365 Lake St., Bristol
217-0192, crazycatwinery.com

What can you expect from a wine tasting experience with Crazy Cat owner Claudette Smith and winemaker Tim Smith? Five pours, a souvenir tasting glass and stories about winemaking and “the Haunted House of Bristol.”

From fruit to wine: Our wines are made from wine grape juices shipped in from California, Washington and Oregon, as well as from Chile, Argentina, South Africa, Italy, Australia, etc. and fresh fruit from New Hampshire. All of our wines are produced here on site. We have planted a small vineyard on site that we hope will produce wine-quality fruit in a few years.

What makes us unique: One of the factors that makes us unique is our rather large selection of wines and varied styles. We produce reds, whites, semi-sweet summer wines, fruit wines and several dessert wines. Our proximity to Newfound Lake makes us an especially convenient and fun location for visitors to the Lakes Region. This building was built in 1880 and the tasting room is in the original carriage house.

The tasting experience: Our tasting experience consists of five pours from our collection and includes a logo souvenir tasting glass. Tastings are done in our Tuscan-themed tasting room. During the summer months, we also offer outdoor seating and service. One of our favorite things to do is to meet and talk to our customers, talk about the wines and winemaking. We also love to tell our story and tell tales about the building. It has been described by many locals as “the Haunted House of Bristol.” On many occasions, we love to sit with customers talking about our unique and weird experiences since moving into this building. Lots of unexplained happenings!

Popular pours: Popular pours would be our Reserve Merlot, juice sourced from Washington State; Whisker White, our special blend of three whites; Beach Peach semi-sweet summer wine and the Chocolate Espresso dessert wine.

Personal favorite: Tim’s new personal favorite is our Grenache Rose — light, clean with a distinct flavor of fresh strawberry. Claudette’s favorite is the cabernet sauvignon.

During the cooler off season months, Crazy Cat is open Friday through Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. In warmer months it is open Thursday to Saturday from noon to 7 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. Visit the website for current hours.

Flag Hill Distillery and Winery

297 N. River Road, Lee
flaghill.com


​Cassey Nickerson, brand ambassador for Flag Hill, talks about what the largest vineyard in the state has to offer.

From fruit to wine: ​Flag Hill sits on a 110-acre conservation easement, which preserves the property to remain in agriculture forever. The vineyard itself comprises two areas on the property totaling 14 acres, making Flag Hill the largest vineyard in the state of New Hampshire. We focus primarily on cold-tolerant white grapes, though we grow a total of six hybrid grapes, which consist of both whites and reds. The types of grapes are Minnesota hybrids and French-American hybrids, and varieties are Cayuga, vignoles, la crescent, Niagara, de Chaunac and Marechal Foch. While we do grow all of our grapes for our grape wines, and the corn and rye for whiskey, we do not grow our own fruits for our fruit wines, though we source these from within New Hampshire and the surrounding New England states as best we can. 

What makes us unique: ​We are a true farm winery and farm distillery. Growing the grapes and grains here at Flag Hill means that we have control over everything, from the compost that goes into our soil, to the temperature at the time of harvest.

The tasting experience: We offer a guided public tour every weekend at noon with one of our staff. If you … miss the scheduled tour, we encourage you to explore the grounds via our self-guided walking tour, which has 18 stations to visit. Our tastings are $5 for five tastes, where you get to choose which wines, spirits or combination of those you would like to try. Small snack boards are available, as well as glasses of wine, … wine smoothies and other seasonal offerings. … We are looking forward to when we can return, safely, to bar service in the Tasting Room, where guests get a one-on-one with our staff. … We are [also] looking forward to the summer of 2021 with the addition of an outdoor patio [where] guests can grab a flight, a glass and a friend and enjoy the day under the pergola. 

Popular pours: Aromatic white wines are certainly what we do best at Flag Hill, so our visitors gravitate toward those. Our most popular pour within this would have to be our Cayuga white. It is our fan favorite that pops with flavors of green apple, peach and pear, very similar to a Germanic-style riesling. If you are more of a bubbly wine drinker, give the sparkling Cayuga white a try! Add a dash of one of our fruit liqueurs and your day is made. 

Personal favorite: La crescent. This is hands down our winemaker’s favorite. La crescent is intensely aromatic with notes of honeydew, pineapple and orange blossom; it is the perfect marriage of sweetness versus acidity at the first sip. 

The Tasting Room & Gift Store is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., seven days a week, year round, with the exception of Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day.

Fulchino Vineyard

187 Pine Hill Road, Hollis
438-5984, fulchinovineyard.com

For owner and winemaker Al Fulchino, winemaking has been part of his family’s history for nearly two centuries — so it only makes sense that he now has vineyards of his own.

From fruit to wine: We believe in simplicity. We have four vineyards within two miles. … We like to source what we use. Eighty-five to 88 percent comes from our property. We plant, pick, prune, we bottle, we label … we do all that. We believe in letting the wine speak for itself by staying out of the way. [We have] good vineyard sites to warm up and ripen the grapes. … We bought the land in 1991 and in 2007 planted the first vineyard. It’s a very successful piece of land for growing wine grapes. … Everything on this property, we built it.

What makes us unique: What makes us different, I don’t even want to know. All we can do is what we do. I think we make people happy.

The tasting experience: We cater to people who like wine, want to like wine or are curious about wine. We expect to exceed expectations with the wine person [and we] want to show people how to appreciate wine in a non-snobby way. I talk to everybody I can talk to, [and] we try to impart our knowledge on our staff. … [Tasters can try] five or six wines. … We try to give people information about the wine and what pairs well with it. [We want to] show people where the wine shines. … We try to have 18 to 22 [wines] on the table, but if we’re hit really hard there may only be 10 to 12 wines on the table. Right now there are 15 wines on today’s table. Things come and go.

Popular pours: Mirabella is our signature proprietary blend. It is a very full-bodied robust red that is meant to savor … with stone fruit notes, notes of chocolate, orange peel. It’s a crowd favorite, our No. 2 wine. No. 1 is a sister wine to Mirabella [where we] alter the aging process and we oak it differently: Cenare. It’s a French oak.

Personal favorite: If I just want a sip I like to go to my Mirabella. If I’m eating a certain type of dish, I might need my pinot or my chardonnay.

Hours now through March are Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., opening daily from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. starting in April.

Gilmanton Winery & Vineyard

528 Meadow Pond Road, Gilmanton
267-8251, gilmantonwinery.com

Owners Sunny and Marshall Bishop offer tastings in the former home of a local legend.

Photo courtesy of Gilmanton Winery & Vineyard.

From fruit to wine: We have roughly 4 acres and six different kinds of vines: seyval, reliance, Concord, Marechal Foch, Marquette and aurore. We also make some of our wines from grapes that have already been pressed.

What makes us unique: Our property is just under 9 acres, and the house, which is attached to the business, was once owned by Grace Metalious, the author of Peyton Place. My husband, the winemaker, is a retired Marine and I’m a retired flight attendant, [so] we have a bit of memorabilia here.

The tasting experience: You get to taste at your own table, whether inside or outside, and we bring the flights of wine to you. We also serve [light bites, like cheese and crackers] and we do as much local as we can. My husband also loves to walk around and chat with everyone. … We also serve brunches every Sunday morning. We’re planning on doing picnics this summer.

Popular pours: Our most popular wines are Jack the Ripper, Green Apple Riesling and Blueberry Surprise.

Personal favorite: My favorite is Jack the Ripper. It’s from the carmenere grape and is a dry red wine.

Gilmanton Winery is open Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 1:30 to 5 p.m. for wine tastings.

Hermit Woods Winery

72 Main St., Meredith
253-7968, hermitwoods.com

Photo courtesy of Hermit Woods Winery.

Owner Bob Manley talks about the highly interactive experience you’ll have at a wine tasting at Hermit Woods.

From fruit to wine: Each of our … handcrafted wines is made from a unique combination of locally sourced fruit, honey and flowers, in some cases wild-foraged. Our process is … hands-on from vine to bottle, using old-world techniques. … The result is a wine with rich, complex flavors. All of our wines are vegan, with the exception of honey wines, gluten-free, raw and mostly organic to best management practices. … We get our fruit from farmers all over New England, and on occasion outside of New England when supplies are short

What makes us unique: Hermit Woods is crafting dry, barrel-aged, European-style wines, many of which can be laid down for years in your cellar, from fruit other than grapes. We are the only winery I am aware of with this focus anywhere. We also offer a farm-to-table restaurant at the winery and sell local cheeses, meats and other locally crafted food items at the winery. We will soon be offering a listening room, called The Loft at Hermit Woods, where we will be showcasing music from around the country and possibly the world.

Our tasting experience: Our tasting experience is highly interactive, providing guests with an in-depth knowledge of our wine, wine in general, and wine application. We do offer tours, [but] they won’t resume until we are 100 percent past Covid. We will also be offering a wide variety of advanced tasting programs. … A typical tasting lasts about 30 minutes and is one-on-one with our team. Our premium tasting experience will be a 45-minute presentation by the owners and management only.

Popular pours: Our most popular wine is Petite Blue and Petite Blue Reserve. [Petite Blue] is bursting with fresh blueberry aromas and flavors. An entire pound of wild low-bush blueberries is in each and every bottle of wine. Unlike many available blueberry wines, this dry blueberry wine embodies the characteristics of a more traditional dry red wine. We enjoy it slightly chilled. Petite Blue Reserve, a specially crafted vintage of our … Petite Blue, is fuller in body and finishes long and dry like so many fine Burgundies we have come to love. Like our Petite Blue, there is over an entire pound of wild low-bush blueberries in every bottle. Also very popular is our Winnipesaukee Rosé. … Cranberries and apples are blended together in this rich, sweet, and tangy wine.

Personal favorite: Our personal favorite is our Red Scare, a multi-berry melomel. Whole wild blueberries, organic blackberries and raspberries, and local, raw, unfiltered honey providing balance, structure, and long-deep flavors. This wine was aged in a French oak barrel for many months. A complex, dry wine with great aging potential.

Hermit Woods is open seven days a week, year round. Wine tastings are available at any time during operating hours, which are Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the winter. It stays open an hour later in the summer.

LaBelle Winery

345 Route 101, Amherst; 104 Congress St., Portsmouth; and coming in May, 14 Route 111, Derry, labellewinery.com

Photo courtesy of LaBelle Winery.

Michelle Thornton, director of marketing and business development, explains the winemaking process that happens on the grounds of LaBelle’s Amherst property and describes the winery’s most popular pours.

From fruit to wine: LaBelle Winery Amherst has seven different grape varieties planted on about 2 acres of land. … Varieties of grapes are chancellor, noiret, petit amie, seyval blanc, petit pearl and Brianna, and are all cold-hardy to withstand New England winters. The vines will be hand-harvested in the fall when the grapes reach the optimal sugar and acidity and will immediately be transported to the crush pad behind the winery. … LaBelle also sources grapes from the Finger Lakes region of New York, California, and Washington State to supplement our volume. Our fruit wine is produced using farm fruits from all over New England. … Ripe red grapes are crushed in a crusher/destemmer. Must [a juice containing the skin, seeds and vines] is placed in a container and a selected strain of yeast is added. In the fermentation process, yeast added to the grape or fruit juice converts sugar into both carbon dioxide, which is released into the air, and alcohol. … After being filtered from the other organic material, most red wines undergo a second, malolactic fermentation, in which sharp malic acids are converted to softer lactic acids. Racking and filtering follow when the wine is separated from any remaining solids. Clarified wine is placed in bottles and sealed. For white grape processing, instead of being crushed, white grapes are gently pressed to avoid juice contact with the skins or broken seeds and vines that give red wines that sharp, tannic taste. The juice is collected in a fermentation tank [either stainless steel or oak] and may be clarified once before a yeast variety is selected and added. Fermentation of white wines usually occurs at cooler temperatures and for more time than reds to maintain crisp, fruity aromas and flavors. Barrel aging and malolactic fermentation may occur for some wines [like chardonnay], followed by clarification and bottling.

What makes us unique: Amy LaBelle is the winemaker, founder and owner of the business, along with her husband, Cesar Arboleda. LaBelle processes over 40 tons of grapes a year, which will be doubling in 2021 with the Derry property’s addition. LaBelle is known for its friendly and inviting staff and incredible dining, shopping options and educational and fun events that complement the award-winning wine. LaBelle also hosts hundreds of private events a year, such as weddings, corporate and nonprofit events.

The tasting experience: Our expert tasting room representatives guide guests by sampling our wines, all produced in our … winemaking facility in Amherst. During a wine tasting, a guest can select from over 35 of our different wines to taste. … Tastings are first-come, first-served, and do not require a reservation. Our guided tours, which are approximately 20 to 30 minutes, provide an overview of the building architecture, vineyards and winemaking production cellar within our Amherst facility. Additionally, guests are welcome to follow our self-guided tour brochure at any time during operating hours. We also offer private tasting and tours, which require a reservation. Tour and tastings are highly interactive and educational. The LaBelle Winery Derry property will have a new structure built, named LaBelle Winery, home to a tasting room and a space where a new line of sparkling wines will be produced. The tasting room will wrap around the production and aging experience and will require additional equipment and riddling racks that we don’t have space for in our Amherst location. The new red, white and rosé sparkling wines will be made using the French Methode Champenoise, making the Champagne house at LaBelle Winery Derry the only one of its kind in New England.

Popular pours: Rose, a dry, classic blend of the red grapes grenache and syrah, with aromas of watermelon, florals and strawberries; Americus, with a rich tannin structure and loads of pepper on the palate; petit verdot, a bold red wine with strong floral and fruit tones and a deep tannin structure; seyval blanc, a delicate wine with citrus tones and a crisp, clean finish; and malbec, a deep red rich wine that’s spicy and bold on the palate with a lush and balanced finish.

Personal favorite: Americus

LaBelle’s hours are changing soon; visit the website for the most up-to-date information.

Sweet Baby Vineyard

260 Stage Road, Hampstead
347-1738, sweetbabyvineyard.com

Photo courtesy of Sweet Baby Vineyard.

Owners Lewis and Stacey Eaton live and work on their farm, where they offer a relaxed wine-tasting experience and a chance to walk around the vineyard. Lewis Eaton shared more about what you’ll find at Sweet Baby Vineyard.

From fruit to wine: We are a small family-owned vineyard and winery that grows six different cold-hardy grape varieties. Each year we expand our vineyard, with plenty of room to grow for the future. Our … fruit wines are all made with locally grown New Hampshire fruits. We source them directly from single source farms. … Our winemaking process is simple and natural with all-natural ingredients letting the wine express its own unique character.

What makes us unique: What makes us stand out is that we offer locally grown fruit, we are agriculturally driven and are very approachable. We live and work on the farm and love what we do. Coming to our farm is very relaxed and easy.

The tasting experience: Our tasting experience is super-relaxed and guided by our incredible tasting staff. Our winery sits in the middle of our 8-acre farm. We offer 25 different wines — fruit, grape, sparkling and fortified — [and] our tasting staff and winemaker will explain everything from where the fruit is from, how it is made and usually what their favorites are. Though there isn’t a formal tour, our grounds are open to everyone and we allow folks to roam through the vines and enjoy the beauty we offer. … We have both indoor and outdoor — in warmer weather — seating.

Popular pours: Some of our most popular wines are our blueberry wines — sparkling, port-style and still — and our varietals, like Niagara and Marechal Foch, that we grow on the property. The blueberry wines are produced semi-sweet and are made with locally grown low bush wild blueberries from Alton, New Hampshire. We do three versions of Niagara: sweet, sparkling and dry. These are grown on our farm. Marechal Foch is a dry red grown on our property and aged in American oak barrels for two years and is a dry medium-bodied table wine.

Personal favorite: My favorite is our Farm Stand White. It is a blend of la crescent, petite amie and aromella. Two of the grape varieties are grown here and the other we buy from [Flag Hill Distillery and Winery]. It is an off-dry aromatic white perfectly balanced acidity with melon and citric notes. This wine is incredible.

Sweet Baby Vineyard is open year-round from noon to 4 p.m. Thursday and noon to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday.

Winnipesaukee Winery

458 Center St., Wolfeboro
455-0182, winniwinery.com

Heidi von Goetz Cogean, owner and winemaker, looks toward the future at her vineyard.

From fruit to wine: We are a New Hampshire farm winery, woman-owned and family-operated. We grow cold-hardy white grapes in our vineyard, [which] operated as a dairy farm from 1810 to 1942. … The vineyard was planted in 2018 [and] we expect a harvest in 2023. We source our cabernet sauvignon and merlot red grapes from the Lanza family vineyard in Sonoma County, California, and our award-winning carmenere from the Central Valley of Chile. Wild blueberries are purchased locally and rhubarb comes from Tuftonboro, New Hampshire, [and we make] both sweet and dry wine from these fruits.

What makes us unique: All of our red wines are classic European-style fully dry reds, aged in French oak barrels. We are currently selling vintage 2016 dry reds, [and] we are the only New Hampshire winery selling oak barrel-aged wine that is over four years old. We are [also] New Hampshire’s only winery and bed and breakfast. … We also have a huge barn full of antiques for sale … from April to mid October.

The tasting experience: We conduct a four-wine tasting, with [an] option to enjoy prepackaged snacks procured from Black- and woman-owned companies. [Visitors can] enjoy a glass of wine on the patio [or] a bottle of wine in our vineyard. Frozen wine slushies [and] wine cocktails with real fruit are … popular. … Most days the winemaker is serving customers. … Private tastings with [a] charcuterie board can be arranged after hours.

Popular pours: Wicked Good Red, [which is] 50 percent cabernet and 50 percent merlot, [is] our most popular wine. [It] pairs well with heartier fare [and has] balanced tannins and superb mouthfeel. [We are] selling vintage 2016 right now.

Personal favorite: Whatever I am currently bottling!

Winnipesaukee Winery is open May through October, Thursday through Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.

Zorvino Vineyards

Photo courtesy of Zorvino.

226 Main St., Sandown
info@zorvino.com, zorvino.com

Tom Zack, wine director, talks about the wines, the food and the woodwork you can find at Zorvino Vineyards.

From fruit to wine: Zorvino Vineyards is an 80-acre property in the middle of a Northern hardwood forest, which is composed of vines, fields, woodlands with trails, a pond and a beautiful post and beam manor house. … Our actual vineyard is now home to 1,000 vines, including la crescent, Marquette, petite pearl, St. Croix, Itasca, Valiant, Frontenac, Frontenac Gris and Niagara. Most of these are known as Minnesota hybrids. We have extensive gardens where we grow vegetables for our restaurant plus for winemaking and fruit trees that bear fruit for wine also. We source premium grapes from wine regions all over the world including California, Italy, South America and South Africa. Additionally, we start with local fruit from New Hampshire and then branch out to other areas of America depending upon production needs. Our wine is initially made in stainless steel drums and then the premium wines are transferred to American Oak barrels for aging and refining.

What makes us unique: We are one of the largest and busiest wineries in New Hampshire, especially during the summer months when our outdoor patio is open. … Our kitchen puts together a menu that includes creative sandwiches and flatbreads to pair with our options of six different flights where the wines rotate from week to week. The patio can seat up to 80 people but we allow guests to bring blankets and chairs and enjoy our beautiful property. We have our own sawmill and you can often see Jim Zanello, our owner, working on our own hardwoods to create tables, chairs and … whimsical items of all shapes and sizes.

The tasting experience: Our typical offering consists of six different wine flight options, where each flight includes four rotating wines of 3 ounces each. All our outdoor tables are reservation only, made through our website, and reservations are for an hour and a half each. During Covid we have suspended tours, but guests are welcome to wander the property and enjoy the scenery. We also have first-come first-served tables and benches near the pond and throughout the property if the patio is full. When you purchase your flight samples, our winery staff will fill you in on which wines you’ll be trying. Our … staff is always glad to take the time to answer any questions you may have about our wines or our history.

Popular pours: We make more different varietals than any winery in New Hampshire: white, red or fruit wines totaling over 40 this past year. … We are also known for our Z Wine Labs offerings, which are short-run wines that are released every two weeks and include … Peanut Butter & Jelly, Blackberry Bourbon Smash, Chocolate Hazelnut, Key Lime Pie, Field Day (watermelon) and many, many more. We also offer a new product that is quickly gaining in popularity. It’s called Good Boy Sparkling Seltzer. It’s unique in that it’s wine based and comes in at 7 percent alcohol. This means lower-calorie too because [there’s] less sugar.

Personal favorite: My current favorites are the Tempranillo Barbera Blend, zinfandel and tempranillo that are sourced from the Lanza Vineyard in the Suisun Valley of California. These are aged in American white oak for six months to a year or more and are our top reds. These continue to get better and better.

Zorvino is open daily year round, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended hours in the summer, usually until 8 p.m. There is indoor seating and a seasonal patio, which sometimes closes early for weddings and other functions.

Featured photo: Photo courtesy of Flag Hill Distillery and Winery.

Find your Book Love

How to rediscover classics,
find new titles that interest you and have more fun with reading

If it’s been years since you’ve picked up a book (no judgment!), the idea of reentering the vast and always-expanding world of literature can be overwhelming. But with genres that cover everything from werewolves to World War II and reading formats that accommodate all kinds of lifestyles, becoming a reader is easier than ever.

“Every child is an artist, but as they get older, most people stop drawing, stop coloring, and I think it can be the same way with reading,” said Michael Herrmann, owner of Gibson’s Bookstore in Concord. “Every child loves stories, but somewhere along the line, we lose that. The secret here is to get back in touch with that inner child and ask yourself, what kinds of stories do I want to hear now?”

Find a book

Caitlin Loving, head of circulation at Bedford Public Library, said one of the most common hang-ups people have about reading is simply not knowing what to read.

“There is such a wealth of options, which is nice, but it can also be really overwhelming and intimidating,” Loving said, “and if it’s been a while [since you’ve read], you may not know what you’d like.”

Books based on or related to your favorite films and TV series can be a great starting point, Loving said, as they allow you to dive deeper into a story or subject that you know you’re interested in.

“Even though you know what the book is about, there’s often a lot that gets left out [in the screen adaptation], so reading the book can really add to your enjoyment,” she said.

Another popular gateway to reading is nonfiction, said Emily Weiss, head of reference services at Bedford Public Library. You can explore a memoir or autobiography by a person who’s always fascinated you, or a self-help guide that addresses an area of your life that you want to improve, or a commentary on a social or political issue that you’re passionate about.

“If you have someone who is a reluctant reader but really likes sports, a nonfiction book about a sports team or a biography on an athlete will oftentimes draw them in,” Weiss said.

“When I read nonfiction, I can’t stop talking about what I’ve read to other people,” added Susan Harmon, information and technology librarian at Manchester City Library. “It’s a great way to learn more about something interesting or weird, or to become an expert on a subject or hobby of some kind.”

If reading a whole book feels like too much to start, try a book of poetry, short stories, a graphic novel or a novella instead.

“Warm up your reading muscles first … and start small,” said Rachel Stover, technical services assistant at Manchester City Library. “If you haven’t read anything in a while, something too long might get discouraging.”

There’s no shame in reading a young adult or children’s book either, said Sarah St. Martin, systems librarian for GMILCS, Inc., a nonprofit consortium of public and academic libraries in New Hampshire,

“Don’t limit yourself,” she said. “There are so many great children’s stories out there, and there’s no reason why you shouldn’t read them.”

“It truly is a golden age for young adult literature,” Herrmann added. “These are books that have great stories and characters … and don’t involve a huge time commitment.”

Podcasts, YouTube channels and magazines often provide recommendations of new titles, especially within a particular genre or niche.

“A lot of YouTubers talk about books they’ve read that go along with what they talk about on their channel, so that can be a really good springboard,” Harmon said.

For more personalized recommendations, reach out to family, friends and co-workers who are readers and know what your interests are, or talk with the staff at your local library or bookstore, who can give you recommendations based on your interests, reading level and goals.

“The people who work in those places are in love with books,” Herrmann said. “They’ll help connect you with the kinds of stories that you’re looking for.”

To read or not to read

Inevitably, you will pick up some books that looked promising at first glance but fall short of your expectations. At that point, you’ll need to decide whether you want to cut your losses early on, read a little more in hopes that it redeems itself, or finish the book regardless.

A good rule of thumb is to read at least 50 pages of a book before making a judgment, Loving said; if it hasn’t appealed to you by then, it’s probably never going to, but if you want to be sure that you aren’t missing out, take a look at the reviews.

“Oftentimes a review will say, ‘It picks up in the second half,’ or ‘The ending is worth it,’ and that can be helpful for deciding if you want to keep going with it or not,” Loving said.

The reverse is also possible:

“You might start a book and be really into it, and then, halfway through, it changes and you aren’t into it anymore,” St. Martin said.

Whether you’re 20 pages in or 200 pages in, if you know that the book just isn’t for you, it’s OK to put it to rest and move on to a book you find more enjoyable.

“A lot of people feel like they have to stick with a book, even if it’s not really capturing their attention, or else they feel like a failure,” Loving said. “I say life is too short for that.”

“There are hundreds of thousands of books that you could be reading, so why read something that’s not speaking to you?” Weiss added.

Make the time

Many people think they don’t have time to read, St. Martin said, but one easy way to find time is to identify the minutes spent checking the news or social media between tasks and use those minutes to read instead.

“Even just that short amount of time is a good way to start,” she said.

If you’re out and about, Loving said, bring a book or download an ebook on your phone so that you can squeeze some reading in while you’re in line at the grocery store, in the waiting room at the doctor’s office or taking public transportation.

“If you’re really hooked on a book, you’ll see that no amount of time is too short,” she said. “You’ll be looking for every little moment to read because you won’t want to put it down.”

If you are able to set aside a more consistent time for reading each day, Harmon said, try to make it an “experience ” — something you look forward to — as opposed to an obligation. One way to do that is by finding a quiet reading space with comfortable seating and sufficient lighting. A cup of hot cocoa, coffee, tea or another hot drink is also a nice touch.

“Minimize distractions,” Harmon said. “Go to the bathroom, eat a snack, get a drink and get comfy.”

Listen up

If a sit-down reading time isn’t feasible, audiobooks may be the best option because they allow you to multitask.

“You can listen while doing boring chores, cooking, exercising, walking, driving,” Harmon said. “It makes the time pass faster … and you get some reading done.”

Audiobooks aren’t just convenient; they’re another way for readers to experience a story.

“Some books you might enjoy more on audiobook, some you might enjoy better reading — it depends,” St. Martin said. “If you’re reading a book and you’re not getting a good feel for it, listening to it on audiobook may make the imagery and characters and everything come alive for you.”

The narrator can make or break an audiobook, Harmon said, so try listening to a sample first, if possible. An over-dramatic or silly voicing of the characters; unfamiliar or odd word pronunciations; or insufficient pop filtering during the recording can be a dealbreaker, Harmon said, but a well-narrated audiobook can be magical.

“There are books I listened to as audiobooks that have become some of my favorite books, simply because the narrator added so much to it,” she said. “He can bring the characters to life in a way that my imagination wouldn’t have done.”


Discover the classics

Local librarians shared 30 classic books that are worth reading outside of English class.

Recommended by Emily Weiss, head of reference services; Caitlin Loving, head of circulation; and Patricia Kline-Millard, reference librarian, at Bedford Public Library:

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

War & Peace by Leo Tolstoy

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

White Fang by Jack London

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

Dune by Frank Herbert

Blackout by Connie Willis

Recommended by Susan Harmon, information and technology librarian, and Rachel Stover, technical services assistant, at Manchester City Library:

Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger

The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Beowulf by Unknown

The Forever King by Molly Cochran

Slaughterhouse 5 by Kurt Vonnegut

Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller

The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton

Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert A. Heinlein

Epic of Gilgamesh, author unknown, or Sin-Leqi-Unninni

Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

The Giver by Lois Lowry

The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Classics made easy

Caitlin Loving, head of circulation at Bedford Public Library, shared eight tips for enjoying classic books.

1. Simplify with an annotated edition. “They have detailed explanations of words, phrases, and period details that will enrich your understanding and reading experience,” Loving said. “For example, the annotated edition of Moby-Dick explains all of the obscure nineteenth-century whaling terms, which will definitely enhance your understanding of the story.”

2. Break it down. Moby-Dick actually has short chapters, and it’s great to read it this way, and a lot of celebrated literature was serialized before it was collected in novel form,” Loving said.

3. Get academic. “You can take notes to keep characters straight and solidify your understanding, and you can look up words you don’t know,” Loving said. “If you’d like to get more formal about it, there are lectures available for free online.”

4. Read a nonfiction book about the book,such asOn Reading the Grapes of Wrath by Susan Shillinglaw, So We Read On: How The Great Gatsby Came to Be and Why It Endures by Maureen Corrigan, and Why Read Moby-Dick? by Nathaniel Philbrick. “These are often fairly short and can bring out aspects of the story you might have missed, or enhance your experience by diving deeper into it,” Loving said. “It’s almost like taking a class about the book or discussing it with a good friend.”

5. Listen to it on audiobook. “Hearing the story can provide greater comprehension,” Loving said, “and one advantage of classics is that there are often several different narrators to choose from so that you can select the voice that speaks to you.”

6. Try a graphic novel adaptation. “The visual aspect can add a lot to the experience,” Loving said. “While they are often abridged, it’s still a great way to read a classic, either to jog your memory, in addition to reading the full text, or just as a way to get to know more classics than you might have time for otherwise.”

7. Find a reading buddy. “You can gush about symbolism, commiserate over the extensive number of indistinguishable Russian surnames, and hold each other accountable for finishing books,” Loving said.

8. Don’t force it. “If you get 50 pages in … and you’re not into it, it’s okay to give up,” Loving said. “No one is grading you, and just because someone decided it belongs in the Western canon does not mean you are obligated to read it.”


New books for new bookworms

Susan Harmon, information and technology librarian at Manchester City Library, shared 10 approachable new releases that have been popular at the library.

Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi

“A deeply ruminative story on depression, addiction, grief, loss, science, religion, faith and love. Readers were drawn in by the engaging and lyrical writing, and the strong character development. You’ll definitely cry.”

The Body: A Guide for Occupants by Bill Bryson

“A well-researched, funny and deeply fascinating exploration of the human body. The writing style is conversational without making you feel talked down to.”

The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

“This historical novel is … [an] authentic story of the Native American experience and fight for rights. Readers loved the engaging storytelling, vivid characters, fascinating historical elements and atmospheric tone.”

The Splendid and the Vile: A Saga of Churchill, Family, and Defiance During the Blitz by Erik Larson.

“A deeply compelling and immersive exploration of the day-to-day life of Churchill and his family during his first year as prime minister.”

Solutions and Other Problems by Allie Brosh

“An offbeat, comedic, and engaging collection of illustrated, biographical essays on topics ranging from childhood and very bad pets to grief, loneliness and powerlessness in modern life.”

The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett

“Bennett has an incredible ability to weave together unforgettable characters, complex family drama, tragedy, romance, love and triumph. It’s a story of twin sisters who took two very different paths in life.”

The Midnight Library by Matt Haig

“This book is both fast-paced and deeply philosophical. The fantastic setting allows the author to engage playfully and profoundly with some heavy topics, but you won’t get bogged down.”

The Guest List by Lucy Foley

“This murder mystery will keep you guessing until the end. There is suspense and action from page 1. Each small detail could be a clue, and each of the characters are as guilty as the rest.”

The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V. E. Schwab

“This fantastic story explores a timeless theme: ‘Be careful what you wish for.’”

The Last Traverse: Tragedy and Resilience in the Winter Whites by Ty Gagne

“An epic story of a daring rescue in the White Mountains [that] weaves the personal accounts of volunteer rescuers and survivors with fascinating weather and survival information. This well-researched page-turner will be hard to put down.”

Sarah St. Martin, systems librarian for GMILCS consortium of New Hampshire libraries, shared some other recently published titles that have appeal for newbie readers:

Celebrity memoirs

The Answer Is … Reflections on My Life by Alex Trebek

Is This Anything? by Jerry Seinfeld

Greenlights by Matthew McConaughey

From page to screen

Battle of Brothers William and Harry— The Inside Story of a Family in Tumult by Robert Lacy and Finding Freedom: Harry and Meghan and the Making of a Modern Royal Family by Omid Scobie and Carolyn Durand (for fans of The Crown on Netflix)

Return to Virgin River by Robyn Carr (Virgin River on Netflix)

28 Summersby Elin Hilderbrand (based on the film Same Time Next Year)

Ready Player Two by Ernest Cline (sequel to Ready Player One book and film)

Help yourself

Personality Isn’t Permanent: Break Free from Self-Limiting Beliefs and Rewrite Your Story by Benjamin Hardy

The New Rules of Aging Well: A Simple Program for Immune Resilience, Strength, and Vitalityby Frank Lipman

Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day by Jay Shetty

Major page-turners

All the Devils are Here by Louise Penny

The Boy from the Woods by Harlan Coben

Masked Prey by John Sandford

One by One by Ruth Ware

Walk the Wire by David Baldacci


Reading reads

Still stumped on what to read? Find inspiration in these “books about books” recommended by Emily Weiss, head of reference services at Bedford Public Library.

1,001 Books to Read Before You Die: A Life-Changing List by James Mustich

The Books That Changed My Life: Reflections by 100 Authors, Actors, Musicians, and Other Remarkable People edited by Bethanne Patrick

Dear Fahrenheit 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks. A Librarian’s Love Letters and Breakup Notes to the Books in Her Life by Annie Spence

Howards End is on the Landing: A Year of Reading from Home by Susan Hill

My Life with Bob: Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books, Plot Ensues by Pamela Paul

Tolstoy and the Purple Chair: My Year of Magical Reading by Nina Sankovitch

The Toni Morrison Book Club by Juda Bennett, Winifred Brown-Glaude, Cassandra Jackson, and Piper Kendrix Williams

What to Read and Why by Francine Prose

Summer camp!

Get excited about

Summer Camp!

Your guide to day camps and their plans for this summer

Summer camps are back in business, from special interest camps for art, sports, academic enrichment, STEM and nature, to general interest camps with all kinds of games and activities.

With many camps limiting their capacity this year to allow for social distancing, now is the time to register if you want to secure a spot. Here, you’ll find camps with registration open now as well as camps with tentative plans and details to be announced in the coming months.

ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT

Breakthrough Manchester at the Derryfield School 2108 River Road, Manchester, 641-9426, breakthroughmanchester.org

What: Breakthrough Manchester offers middle school summer programming for Manchester middle school students who might not have the resources for summer camp enrollment, delivering a combination of rigorous academics and fun, high-energy summer experiences. Who: Sixth-grade students attending a Manchester middle school, with priority to those who have limited access to summer enrichment opportunities When: Monday through Friday, dates offered June 21 through July 30 (registration deadline is April 1) Cost: Free (includes transportation to and from the school, as well as breakfast and lunch)

College Preparation; Find Your Voice – Jump Start Your College Essay The Derryfield School, 2108 River Road, Manchester, 641-9426, derryfield.org/summer/college-prep–academic-programs

What: This intensive writing workshop is designed to create a space for local high schoolers to begin the creative process of drafting their college essay. The class will be run in person (potential for a virtual option in August if there is interest) with time spent sharing essay drafts as a group and individual time writing with guidance from the teacher. On the final day of the workshop, a college admissions officer will provide the college perspective on the personal statement and read essay drafts. Who: Students entering grades 11 and 12 When: Monday through Friday, 8:30 to 11:30 a.m., dates offered June 7 to June 11 or Aug. 9 to Aug. 13 Cost: $375

Kumon Math & Reading Center 128 S. River Road, Bedford; 505 W. Hollis St., No. 103, Nashua, 897-6194; 95 Brewery Lane, No. 8, Portsmouth, 427-8456; kumon.com

What: Each center offers an independent learning program for kids to freshen up their skills in math and reading. Topics covered in math include counting and number sequencing, fractions, order of operations, algebra, trigonometry and calculus. Topics covered in reading include vocabulary, phonics, sentence building and reading comprehension. Who: Preschool through high school When: The Bedford center is open Monday and Thursday, from 3 to 6 p.m. The Nashua center is open Wednesday, from 4 to 7 p.m., and Friday, from 5 to 8 p.m. The Portsmouth center is open Tuesday and Thursday, from 2 to 6 p.m. Cost: Varies; call your individual center for details

SAT/ACT Preparation The Derryfield School, 2108 River Road, Manchester, 641-9426, derryfield.org/summer/college-prep–academic-programs

What: Students will learn the universal strategies and components of the SAT and ACT, followed by individual recommendations. Classes will include one-on-one time with the instructor and group work. Students may register for verbal sessions, math sessions, or both. Who: Students entering grades 11 and 12 When: Verbal sessions run Monday through Friday from 9:15 to 11:45 a.m., and math sessions run from 12:15 to 2:45 p.m., dates offered June 14 to June 18, July 12 to July 16, or Aug. 9 to Aug. 13 Cost: Ranges from $375 for half-day sessions to $650 for full-day sessions

Thursday Mini-Camps – “We the People: Beyond the Battlefield American Independence Museum, 1 Governors Lane, Exeter, 772-2622, independencemuseum.org

What: Campers will immerse themselves in hands-on 18th century life, discovering the stories of the men and women who fought and won the American Revolution and their stories beyond the battlefield. Up to four sessions are available. Who: Ages 8 to 12 When: Sessions run Thursdays, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., dates offered July 1, July 8, July 15 and July 22 Cost: $45 per day or $170 for all four sessions for museum members; $55 per day or $195 for all four sessions for non-members.

ART

Brainwave Summer Art and STEAM Camps The Nature of Things, 10 Groton Road, Nashua, 881-4815, tnotgroup.com/enrichment-center/summer.php

What: Themes include Canvas Painting & Drawing Plein Air, Duct Tape & Wire Sculpture Arts, Illustrate It, Lost Civilizations: From Culture-Building to Multimedia Museum Exhibit, Art Exploration: From Crayons to Pixels, Minecraft Art Heist: Widgets, Traps, & Redstone, Animate It, Start Up: Birth of a Brand, Lego Mind Palace, Cardboard Quest & Engineering, and Minecraft Around the Universe in 5 Days: Creative World Building & Architecture. Who: Ages 6 through 14 (varies by camp) When: Sessions run for one or two weeks, depending on the camp, Monday through Friday (no camp on Monday, July 5), 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., dates offered June 21 through Aug. 20 Cost: One-week camps range from $355 to $380, two-week camps are $725

Creative Ventures Gallery 411 Nashua St., Milford, 672-2500, creativeventuresfineart.com

What: Discovering Art in Nature camp includes drawing, painting and crafting a variety of art projects inspired by the outdoors. Who: Ages 8 through 12 When: Monday, Aug. 2, through Thursday, Aug. 5, 9 a.m. to noon Cost: $100

Kimball Jenkins School of Art 266 N. Main St., Concord, 225-3932, kimballjenkins.com/summer-arts-camp

What: Campers participate in indoor and outdoor art, history and engineering activities. Themes include Wild Animal Safari, Think Like an Artist, Fantasy & Fashion, Around the Campfire, Magic & Muggles, Travel the World and Bam! Wow! Pop Art! Who: Ages 6 through 17 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., dates offered June 28 through Aug. 20 Cost: $275 per week ($255 for members)

Studio 550 Pottery Camp Studio 550 Community Art Center, 550 Elm St., Manchester, 232-5597, 550arts.com

What: Campers will learn to throw on a pottery wheel and hand-sculpt with clay. Who: Ages 10 through 16 When: Sessions will run Monday through Friday, with a morning option from 9:30 a.m. to noon, and an afternoon option from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Dates TBA. Cost: TBA

Wild Salamander Summer Camps Wild Salamander Creative Arts Center, 30 Ash St., Hollis, 465-9453, wildsalamander.com

What: A variety of art camps that work with a theme or concept, covering several art media, like painting, drawing, sculpting and fiber arts Who: Pre-K through Grade 8 When: Runs weekly, dates offered July 5 through Aug. 6 Cost: Registration will begin April 10; call for more details.

DANCE

Concord Dance Academy 26 Commercial St., Concord, 226-0200, concorddanceacademy.com/dance-camp

What: Camps teach a variety of dance styles, including tap, jazz, lyrical, hip-hop, ballet, tumbling and musical theater. Other activities include arts and crafts, nature walks and scavenger hunts. Who: Ages 3 through 13 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for a full day, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. for a half day, dates offered July 19 through July 23, and July 26 through July 30 Cost: $250 for full day week, $150 for half day week, or $50 per individual full day and $30 per individual half day

Southern New Hampshire Dance Theater 19 Harvey Road, Bedford, 637-4398, snhdt.org What: Programs include Preschool Princess camp and Prima Ballerina camp (girls ages 3 through 5), the Young Dancers’ Program (ages 6 through 12) for beginner and intermediate dancers, and a three-week Summer Intensive (ages 10+) for serious dancers looking to challenge themselves. Who: Girls ages 3 and up When: Preschool camps run Tuesday through Thursday, July 6 through July 15, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.; Young Dancers Program runs Monday through Friday, July 19 through July 23, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; Intensive runs Monday through Friday (with optional Saturday class), July 26 through Aug. 14, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Cost: $160 for Princess and Prima Ballerina camp (or $290 for both), $175 for Young Dancers Program; Intensive ranges from $550 to $1,250, depending on number of weeks

FILMMAKING

Triple Threat Film Camp Londonderry Dance Academy, 21 Buttrick Road, Londonderry, 432-0032, triplethreattheatercamp.com/audition-intensive

What: Campers will learn the process of making a film, including writing; camera, sound and lighting; directing, and editing. Who: Ages 8 to 18 When: Monday, July 5, through Friday, July 9, 8:45 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. Cost: $275

Movie Making Camp SEE Science Center, 200 Bedford St., Manchester, 669-0400, see-sciencecenter.org/movie-making-camp

What: Campers will create an “Invention and Discovery” film using stop motion animation Lego bricks and minifigures. Working in groups, each camper will learn techniques of storyboarding, set design, construction, mini-figure casting and more. Who: Ages 8 to 12 When: Monday, Aug. 2, through Friday, Aug. 6, 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Cost: $300

GENERAL INTEREST

Boys & Girls Clubs of Central New Hampshire Locations in Andover, Concord, Epsom, Holderness, Hopkinton, Laconia, Suncook, Sutton, Warner and Weare, 224-1061, centralnhclubs.org

What: Centers offer general camps and specialty camps, with activities like arts and crafts, water games, sports, field trips, cooking, hiking and more. Who: Grades 1 through 8 (varies depending on the camp location) When: Sessions run Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., dates offered June 14 through Aug. 27 Cost: Ranges from $135 to $200 per week

Boys & Girls Club of Manchester Camp Foster, Kidz Camp and Summer teen program, 36 Camp Allen Road, Bedford; Union Street Clubhouse, 555 Union St., Manchester; 625-5031, begreatmanchester.org

What: Activities at Camp Foster include swimming, playground time, arts and crafts, field games, athletics, hiking, boating and canoeing. Campers at Kidz Kamp (grades K and 1) and in the summer teen program (grades 8 through 12) will participate in similar activities and attend Camp Foster each afternoon. Who: Grades K through 12; membership required ($25) When: Sessions begin Monday, June 21, and end on Friday, Sept. 3 Cost: Ranges from $140 to $145 per week, plus a $25 membership fee ($10 membership fee only for the Summer Teen program).

Brentwood Recreation Day Camp 190 Route 125, Brentwood, hosted by the Brentwood Parks & Recreation Department, 642-6400, rec.brentwoodnh.gov/programs

What: Traditional day camp with activities like water and non-water games, arts and crafts, team-building activities, yoga and more. Who: Kids entering grades 1 through 6 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., dates offered June 21 through Aug. 20 (no camp on Monday, July 5) Cost: Call for details; registration is open now for both residents and non-residents, but is limited due to Covid-19 restrictions

Camp 603 507 Hall St., Bow, 568-8107, camp603.com

What: Activities include trips to Lake Winnisquam for waterskiing, wakeboarding, tubing and other water sports; Mount Major, Mount Cardigan and other local mountains for days of hiking; and Hampton Beach for beach trips, swimming and more. Who: Ages 10 to 17 When: Weekly sessions run from Monday through Friday, dates offered July 6 through Aug. 6 (registration is limited) Cost: $660 for the first week, which is shortened due to the July 4 holiday; $825 for all other weeks

Camp Adventure Auburn Parks & Recreation, 483-5052, ext. 101, auburnnh.us/parks-and-recreation/pages/programs-events

What: During this full-day summer camp, kids will travel on multiple field trips throughout the state, including to the beach, lakes, water parks and more. Who: Kids entering grades 5 through 8 When: Two week-long sessions are offered, from Monday, July 26, through Friday, July 30, or from Monday, Aug. 2, through Friday, Aug. 6, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (meet at the Auburn Safety Complex at 55 Eaton Hill Road) Cost: $279 for the full week (registration is open now to Auburn residents and will open on May 1 to non-residents if space is available.) If camp needs to be canceled due to Covid-19 restrictions, refunds will be issued to all registrants.

Camp Babuck Amherst Parks & Recreation Department, 673-6248, amherstnh.myrec.com

What: A traditional day camp with activities like arts and crafts, group games and sports. Each week is themed; this year’s themes include Spooky, Science, Olympics, Survivor and The Big Top Who: Grades 1 through 7 When: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., dates offered June 21 through Aug. 13 Cost: $215 per week for Amherst residents and $255 per week for non-residents. Extended before or after care is also available.

Granite Base Camp 300 Blondin Road, Manchester, 617-615-0004, experiencebasecamp.org

What: This outdoor day camp features hands-on activities for kids ages 6 to 10, such as hiking, ecology, archery, crafts, swimming, fishing and more. Specialty camps are also available for ages 11 to 14, featuring activities like mountain biking, kayaking and fort building. Who: Ages 6 to 14 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., dates offered June 28 to Aug. 13 (each activity depends on the week) Cost: $330 per week

Camp Coolio New Boston Central School, 15 Central School Road, New Boston, hosted by the New Boston Parks & Recreation Department, 487-2880, newbostonnh.gov

What: Activities include sports, games, crafts and more. There are six themed weeks throughout the summer. This year’s themes are Harry Potter Week, Animal Planet Week, Disney Week, Wacky Water Week, Destination Imagination, and Camp’s Got Talent Week. Who: Kids ages 6 to 12 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., dates offered June 28 through Aug. 6 (no camp on Monday, July 5) Cost: $225 per week (Week 2 is $180, as it is a shortened week)

Camp Gottalikeachallenge Southern New Hampshire University, 2500 N. River Road, Manchester, 868-2140, campgottalikeachallenge.org

What: A fast-paced adventure in problem-solving, hands-on learning and challenging activities. Campers will develop their creativity, critical thinking, leadership, confidence and teamwork. Who: Grades 4 through 9 When: Day camp session runs Monday, July 12, through Friday, July 16, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. Cost: $350 ($315 if you register by March 31)

Camp Kettleford 26 Camp Allen Road, Bedford, hosted by Girl Scouts of the Green and White Mountains, 888-474-9686, girlscoutsgwm.org

What: Set on 30 wooded acres on the shore of Sebbins Pond, this traditional day camp features swimming, boating, archery, cooking out, horseback riding, day trips and more. Who: Girls entering grades K to 8 When: Weekly day camp sessions are from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., dates offered July 5 through Aug. 13. Cost: $245 per week, or $475 for a two-week session. Financial assistance is also available.

Camp Lincoln 67 Ball Road, Kingston, 642-3361, ymcacamplincoln.org, hosted by Southern District YMCA, sdymca.org

What: Activities at the traditional day camps include swimming, sports, nature exploration, arts and crafts, archery, boating, ropes courses, pottery and mountain biking. Who: Age 3 through grade 9 When: Sessions run various days/weeks, beginning the week of June 21 and running through Aug. 27. See website for details Cost: Varies; starts at $275 for a one-week session

Camp Lovewell The Nature of Things, 10 Groton Road, Nashua, 881-4815, camplovewell.com

What: Campers will enjoy hiking, field games and sports, swimming, skits and songs, kayaking, arts and crafts, a ropes course and more. Who: Ages 6 through 14 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, dates offered June 21 through Aug. 20 (no camp on Monday, July 5) Cost: Ranges from $350 to $360 per week; extended care is also available

Camp Ponemah Hampshire Hills Athletic Club, 50 Emerson Road, Milford, 673-7123, ext. 272, hampshirehills.com/camp-ponemah

What: Day camps feature activities like swimming, tennis, crafts, dance parties, playgrounds, trails, games and more. Who: Campers entering kindergarten through seventh grade When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., dates offered June 14 through Aug. 27 (no camp on Monday, July 5) Cost: Varies, depending on camper’s age, membership status and the session duration. Multi-sibling discounts are also available

Camp Seawood 350 Banfield Road, Portsmouth, hosted by Girl Scouts of the Green and White Mountains, 888-474-9686, girlscoutsgwm.org

What: Set among pine forests, wetlands and wildlife, this traditional day camp features archery, cooking out, horseback riding, day trips, nature hikes and more. Who: Girls in grades K through 8 When: Weekly sessions run from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., dates offered July 5 through Aug. 20. Cost: Starts at $245 for a one-week session, or $475 for a two-week session. Financial assistance is available.

Camp Souhegan Boys & Girls Club of Souhegan Valley, 56 Mont Vernon St., Milford, 672-1002, svbgc.org

What: Daily camp activities include swimming, theater arts, science and STEM programs, cooking, sports, dance and more, all centered around a different theme each week. Who: Grades K through 12 When: Weekly sessions run Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., dates offered June 21 through Aug. 23 Cost: $185 per week

Camp Starfish 12 Camp Monomonac Road, Rindge, 899-9590, campstarfish.org

What: Camp Starfish provides structured, nurturing and fun group programs to foster the success and growth of children with emotional, behavioral or learning problems. Who: Children ages 6 and up When: Sessions run various weeks, dates from June 22 to July 21 Cost: Rates vary depending on type of camp

Camp Witzel Bedford Parks & Recreation Department, 472-5242, bedfordreconline.com

What: A traditional day camp with activities like arts and crafts, sports, swimming and more. Each week is themed; this year’s themes include Animation Domination, Party in the USA, Edible Engineering, Jedi Training, Fun & Fitness, Aqua Adventure and Camper vs. Counselor Challenge Who: Ages 6 to 13 When: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., dates offered June 21 through Aug. 6 (no camp on Monday, July 5) Cost: Ranges from $115 to $245, depending on the number of days per week and the camper’s resident status, plus a one-time $25 registration fee

Candia Springs Adventure Camps Candia Springs Adventure Park, 446 Raymond Road, Candia, 587-2093, candiasprings.com/camp

What: Campers can enjoy all that the park has to offer by participating in themed weeks that focus on education, environment, exploration and leadership. Themes include Archery, Makers Week, Outdoor Living Skills and more. Who: Ages 8 to 12 When: Weekly sessions run Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., dates offered June 21 through Aug. 13 Cost: $249 per week

Concord Parks and Recreation City Wide Community Center, 14 Canterbury Road, Concord, 225-8690, concordnh.gov

What: Programs include Stay & Play Camp (grades 1 through 5), in which kids enjoy swimming, tennis, arts and crafts, field games and more; Adventure Camp (grades 3 through 8), in which campers will go on four-day trips to beaches, theme parks, hiking and kayaking destinations and more; Nature Camp (ages 5 to 8), in which campers can explore the park and create nature-based crafts); and Explorers Camp (ages 9 to 12), in which campers can explore the City of Concord’s trail system. Specialty camps in a variety of areas are also offered, such as soccer, basketball, TV/video production, dance, and STEM education Who: Grades 1 through 8 When: Most sessions run Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., dates offered June 21 through Aug. 13 (no camp on Monday, July 5); Nature Camp sessions run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and are based out of the Lodge at White Park in Concord Cost: $150 per week for Concord residents and $160 per week for non-residents for Stay & Play Camp; $190 per week for Concord residents and $200 per week for non-residents for Adventure Camp; $160 per week for Concord residents and $170 per week for non-residents for Nature Camp and Explorers Camp (except for the week of July 6 to July 9 for Explorers Camp, which is $128 for Concord residents and $138 for non-residents).

Educational Farm Camp Educational Farm at Joppa Hill, 174 Joppa Hill Road, Bedford, 472-4724, theeducationalfarm.org

What: Campers will learn about animals, work in the garden, take nature hikes and help with farm chores. Who: Ages 4 through 11 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, half days for ages 4 and 5 from 9 a.m. to noon, and full days for ages 6 through 11 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., dates offered June 21 through Aug. 13 Cost: $135 per half-day week, $250 per full-day week

Naticook Summer Day Camp Wasserman Park, 116 Naticook Road, Merrimack, hosted by Merrimack Parks & Recreation, 882-1046, merrimackparksandrec.org/naticook-day-camp

What: Campers enjoy swimming, boating, drama, group games, archery, nature exploration, sports, arts and crafts, special events and more. Who: Grades Pre-K through 9 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., dates offered June 21 through Aug. 20. Extended care is available from 7 to 8 a.m. and from 4 to 6 p.m. Cost: $240 per week for residents, $290 per week for non-residents. Additional fees apply for extended care.

New Hampshire SPCA New Hampshire Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Learning Center, 104 Portsmouth Ave., Stratham, 773-5730, nhspca.org

What: All camp activities are animal-themed, featuring games, crafts, baking, hands-on animal care, handling and feeding, service projects and more. There are three camp age ranges: Little Kids (ages 6 to 8), Big Kids (ages 9 to 12) and Teens (ages 13 to 15) Who: Ages 6 through 15 When: Camp weeks, dates and times TBA Cost: TBA

Pelham Parks & Recreation Pelham Veterans Memorial Park, 109 Veterans Memorial Parkway, Pelham, 635-2721, pelhamweb.com/recreation

What: The camp features activities like swimming, kayaking, beach play, volleyball, basketball, tetherball, relay games, wiffle ball, arts and crafts and more. Who: Ages 6 to 14 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m, dates offered July 6 through Aug. 13 Cost: $475 per child for six weeks (may be limited to Pelham residents only due to the pandemic; a decision on that limitation is pending)

Strawbery Banke Museum Camps 14 Hancock St., Portsmouth, 433-1100, strawberybanke.org

What: Campers will explore the 10-acre outdoor history museum and participate in activities led by professional crafters, archaeologists, character role-players, curators and historians. Who: Ages 6 to 17 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., offered various weeks from June 28 through Aug. 13 Cost: Ranges from $240 to $580, depending on the camp and the camper’s membership status

SummerQuest at World Academy 138 Spit Brook Road, Nashua, 888-1982, worldacademynh.com

What: Programs include arts and crafts, games, cooking activities and much more, all intended to encourage the child’s creativity and imagination. Who: Kindergarten through grade 8 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., dates offered June 14 through Aug. 20 Cost: Ranges from $310 to $340 per week

UNH Youth Programs and Camps University of New Hampshire, Thompson Hall, 105 Main St., Durham, 862-7227, unh.edu/youthprograms

What: More than 50 programs offered for academic enrichment, creative arts, athletics, STEM and traditional camp recreation. See website for a full list. Who: Boys and girls ages 5 and up When: Various dates/times from June through August Cost: Varies depending on the program

YMCA Allard Center of Goffstown Branch of The Granite YMCA, 116 Goffstown Back Road, Goffstown, 497-4663, graniteymca.org/daycamp

What: Camp Halfmoon (ages 6 to 10) and Camp Quartermoon (ages 4 and 5) feature activities like archery, swimming, creative arts, sports and more. Other programs include Discovery Camp (ages 6 to 11), Ultimate Sports (ages 6 to 11), and Mad Science (ages 8 to 11), plus camps in archery, swimming, cooking and more. Who: Ages 4 and up When: Sessions run Monday to Friday, offered various dates from June 21 through Aug. 27 Cost: Varies; call for details

YMCA Day Camp of Hooksett Hooksett Memorial School, 5 Memorial Drive, Hooksett,Branch of The Granite YMCA, 497-4663, graniteymca.org/camps

What: Campers participate in sports, archery, arts and crafts, nature, adventure and special themed days. Who: Ages 5 to 13 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., dates offered June 21 through Aug. 20 Cost: Varies; call for details

YMCA of Downtown Manchester Branch of The Granite YMCA, 30 Mechanic St., Manchester, 232-8632, graniteymca.org/camps

What: Kids at Camp Namoskeag (ages 6 to 14) will enjoy activities like swimming, field games, sports, arts and crafts and more. Each week has a different theme. Who: Ages 6 to 14 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., dates offered June 21 through Sept. 3 Cost: Varies; call for details

YMCA of Greater Nashua Nashua YMCA Branch, 24 Stadium Drive, Nashua, 882-2011; Merrimack YMCA Branch, 6 Henry Clay Drive, Merrimack, 881-7778; Camp Sargent, 141 Camp Sargent Road, Merrimack, 880-4845; nmymca.org

What: Camp Sargent is held on Lake Naticook and includes a traditional day camp and a variety of specialty camps, like Digging for Dinos (grades K through 2), Wild West Camp (grades K through 4), Harry Potter Camp (grades 3 through 6), Archery Camp (grades 5 through 9) and more. The Nashua Branch also has a Little Investigators Camp (ages 3 to 5). The Merrimack Branch day camps include a creative arts camp called Camp Create (grades 1 through 6), and specialty camps like Music Makers (grades 1 through 6), Dance Mania (grades 1 through 4), Skips and Scribbles (grades 1 and 2), and Creative Cooks (grades 1 through 6). Who: Ages 3 and up When: Most sessions run Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., or 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., various dates offered throughout the summer beginning the week of June 14 Cost: Camp Sargent is $210 per week for YMCA members and $275 per week for non-members. Specialty camps at the Merrimack branch are $235 per week for members and $300 per week for non-members. The Little Investigators Camp is $152 per week for members and $165 per week for non-members.

YMCA of Greater Londonderry Branch of The Granite YMCA, 206 Rockingham Road, Londonderry, 437-9622, graniteymca.org/camps

What: Camp Pa-Gon-Ki (pre-K to grade 7) is a traditional day camp featuring creative arts, fort-building, archery, swimming, sports, theater, nature and adventure. Camps for teens include a trip camp, where campers will travel to fun attractions around New England. Who: Ages 5 and up When: Sessions run Monday to Friday, dates offered June 21 through Aug. 27 Cost: Varies; call for details

YMCA of Strafford County Branch of The Granite YMCA, 35 Industrial Way, Rochester; Camp Coney Pine, 63 Lowell St., Rochester; 332-7334, graniteymca.org/camps

What: Camp Coney Pine (ages 5 to 12) includes archery, creative arts, dance, group games, a ropes course, swimming, sports, fort-building and more. A variety of specialty camps new to 2021 are also available, like Mad Science (ages 7 to 11), Ultimate Sports (ages 7 to 11), Raw Arts (ages 6 to 11) and High Adventure (ages 7 to 12) Who: Ages 5 and up When: Sessions run Monday to Friday, dates offered June 21 through Sept. 3 Cost: Varies; call for details

YMCA of the Seacoast Branch of The Granite YMCA, 550 Peverly Hill Road, Portsmouth, 431-2334, graniteymca.org/camps

What: Camp Gundalow (ages 5 to 13) features nature exploration, swimming, a ropes course, sports, creative arts, dancing, fort-building, team-building activities, archery and more. There is also a four-week Leader in Training program for teens, introducing them to becoming leaders through effective communication, team-building and behavior management techniques. Who: Ages 5 to 15 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, dates offered June 21 through Sept. 3 Cost: Varies; call for details

MUSIC

Bedford Youth Performing Company Music Camps 155 Route 101, Bedford, 472-3894, bypc.org/2021-music-summer

What: Virtual Rock Band Camps allow campers to jam, collaborate and perform with fellow musicians over Zoom. A Recording Camp is also offered for grades 7 and up. Who: Grades 4 through 12 When: Rock Band for grades 4 through 6 offered July 26 through Aug. 6, with sessions held Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Rock Band for grades 7 through 12 runs July 12 through July 16, with sessions held Monday through Friday, 4 to 9 p.m. Recording Camp runs Monday, Aug. 16, through Friday, Aug. 20. Cost: $250

Manchester Community Music School 2291 Elm St., Manchester, 644-4548, mcmusicschool.org/summer-camp

What: Programs include musical exploration sessions for students in either grades 1 through 3 or grades 4 through 6. Campers spend the week trying out different types of musical instruments and participating in musical games and music-making activities Who: Grades 1 through 6 When: Sessions are available Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to noon, dates offered Aug. 2 to Aug. 6 for grades 1 through 3 and Aug. 9 to Aug. 13 for grades 4 through 6. Cost: $200

Nashua Community Music School Nashua Millyard, 5 Pine St. Ext., Nashua, 881-7030, nashuacms.org/summercamps

What: Themes for ages 8 through 12 include Musical Olympics, Rise Up & Create, Ukulele Camp, and Broadway Week. Themes for ages 4 through 7 include Fairy Tale Musical Mash-up and Music Around the World. Who: Ages 4 through 12 When: Dates offered June 21 through July 16 for ages 8 through 12, and July 19 through July 30 for ages 4 through 7, sessions run Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Cost: $175

Walden School Young Musicians Program Dublin School 18 Lehmann Way, Dublin, 415-648-4710, waldenschool.org/young-musicians-program

What: A residency camp where campers will receive daily instruction in a supportive community of peers and mentors to hone their musical and creative skills and improvise and compose original works. Who: Ages 9 through 18 When: June 29 through Aug. 4; three-week or five-week sessions are available Cost: Call for details

NATURE

Beaver Brook Nature Camps 117 Ridge Road, Hollis, 465-7787, beaverbrook.org/education/summer-camp

What: Campers will enjoy hikes and outdoor exploring, campfire cooking and nature-themed games and activities. Who: Ages 4 through 16 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday (no camp on Monday, July 5) from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (9 a.m. to noon for ages 4 and 5), dates offered June 21 through Aug. 6 Cost: Ranges from $132 to $285, depending on the camp

Farm, Field and Forest Camp The Nature of Things, 10 Groton Road, Nashua, 881-4815, cultivatingwild.com

What: This program is designed for the camper who loves animals and the outdoors. Campers will participate in the daily routine of a real working farm, learning about sustainability, healthy food, gardening and composting, and humane treatment and care of barn animals such as goats, chickens, donkey and alpaca. Who: Ages 7 through 13 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, dates offered July 12 through Aug. 13 Cost: Ranges from $350 to $360 per week; extended care is also available.

New Hampshire Audubon Nature Day Camps McLane Center, 84 Silk Farm Road, Concord; Massabesic Center, 26 Audubon Way, Auburn; 224-9909, nhaudubon.org/education/nature-day-camp

What: Programs include a half-day Wonders Camp (ages 4 and 5) and a Discovery Camp (ages 6 through 9), featuring hikes, crafts, storytelling, games and live animal presentations. Themes include Buzz and Flutter, Be a Scientist, Survival, Marvelous Mammals, Aquatic Adventures, Digging in the Dirt, and Creatures of the Night Who: Ages 4 through 9 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday (no camp on Monday, July 5) from 9 a.m. to noon for ages 4 and 5 and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. for ages 6 through 9, dates offered June 21 through Aug. 13. Cost: TBA

Outdoor Discovery Summer Camp Amherst Parks & Recreation Department, 673-6248, amherstnh.myrec.com

What: A camp focused on exploring the great outdoors. Each week is themed; this year’s themes include Eco-Zone, Trash to Treasure, Minute to Win It, Olympics and Castaway Who: Grades 1 through 7 When: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., dates offered June 21 through Aug. 13 Cost: $215 per week for Amherst residents and $255 per week for non-residents. Extended before or after care is also available.

WildQuest Camp Prescott Farm Environmental Education Center, 928 White Oaks Road, Laconia, 366-5695, prescottfarm.org/service/wildquest-day-camps/wildquest-summer-camp

What: Campers will participate in nature activities, animal and plant identification, arts and crafts, quests, games and hands-on learning. Themes include Survivor, Kids Can Cook, Nature Artists, Water Water Everywhere, Beyond the Myths, Mad Scientists, Creature Feature, A Little Bit of Everything and A Little Bit More Who: Ages 4 through 14 When: Sessions run Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., dates offered June 28 through Aug. 27 Cost: $235 per week

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Astronomy Camp Meeting House Montessori School28 Logging Hill Road, Bow, 227-9300, meetinghousemontessori.com

What: Through experiments, crafts and lessons, campers will learn about the solar system, the different phases of the moon, stars, constellations, comets, rockets, astronauts and more. Who: Ages 6 to 10 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. or 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., dates offered June 21 to Aug. 20 Cost: Call for details

Brainwave Summer Technology Camps The Nature of Things, 10 Groton Road, Nashua, 881-4815, tnotgroup.com/enrichment-center/summer.php

What: Themes include Lego Urban Planning and Minecraft Adventurecraft: Lost in the City. Who: Ages 6 through 8 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., dates offered July 12 through July 23 Cost: $380

Camp Invention Locations in Amherst, Londonderry and Strafford, 800-968-4332, invent.org

What: Campers participate in a variety of hands-on STEM activities led by local educators. Who: Grades K through 6 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, times vary depending on location, dates offered June 21 through July 2 and Aug. 2 through Aug. 6. Cost: Ranges from $235 to $260, depending on the camp location

FIRST Lego Invention Challenge Camp SEE Science Center, 200 Bedford St., Manchester, 669-0400, see-sciencecenter.org/camp-summer-science-first-lego-session-1

What: Campers use Lego Mindstorms robots in small teams to design, build and program autonomous robots. Who: Ages 9 to 14 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., dates offered July 19 through July 23 and Aug. 2 through Aug. 6 Cost: $300

iSpy Camp SEE Science Center, 200 Bedford St., Manchester, 669-0400,

What: Campers will learn about crime scene investigation and forensic science and espionage through hands-on activities. Who: Ages 8 through 13 When: Monday, July 26, through Friday, July 30, 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Cost: $300

LEtGO Your Mind STEM Program Locations throughout New Hampshire, in Amherst, Bedford, Concord, Dover, Durham, Londonderry, Manchester, Nashua, New London, Pelham, Portsmouth, Salem and Windham, 731-8047, letgoyourmind.com/summer-2021-programs

What: Campers work in small groups on guided STEM-related building projects, including Lego building, as well as free-building time. Who: Ages 4 through 13 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (9 a.m. to noon for ages 4 and 5), dates offered June 21 through Aug. 20. Cost: Ranges from $185 to $355, depending on the camp

McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center STEM Camp 2 Institute Drive, Concord, 271-7827, starhop.com/current-and-upcoming-programs

What: Themes include Coding, Programming and Robots; Blast Off; Junior Flyers on Earth and Beyond; Tech for Ecology; Wicked, Wild Weather; Discover the Dinosaurs; and Astronomy 101. Who: Ages 5 through 14, depending on the camp When: Sessions run Monday to Friday, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. or 2 p.m., depending on the camp, dates offered are June 21 through Aug. 6 Cost: Ranges from $185 to $345, depending on the camp

SEE Science CenterSummer Science Camp 200 Bedford St., Manchester, 669-0400, see-sciencecenter.org/see-camps-programs

What: Campers will explore science topics through hands-on activities. Themes include Electrifying Electricity, Chemical Concoctions, Exhibit Design Lab, and Reverse Engineering. Who: Ages 7 to 13 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., dates offered July 12 to July 16 and Aug. 9 through Aug. 13 Cost: $300

Seacoast Science Center 570 Ocean Blvd., Rye, 436-8043, ext. 16, seacoastsciencecenter.org/programs/environmental-day-camps

What: In Treks 4 Tots (ages 4 and 5) and Seaside Safari (grades K through 5), campers will explore the different habitats in Odiorne Point State Park as well as the live animal exhibits and hands-on exhibits in the center to develop a greater understanding and appreciation of the natural world. Safari Stewards (grades 6 through 8) is a field trip program. Each session will have its own theme. A marine biology camp is also available for high school students. Who: Age 4 and up When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (half-day option available for Treks, from 9 a.m. to noon), dates offered June 21 through Aug. 27. 14 Cost: Ranges from $250 to $400, depending on the camp. Single day options also available for some camps.

Space and Astronomy Camp North End Montessori School698 Beech St., Manchester, 621-9011, northendmontessori.com

What: Campers will have the chance to explore the solar system, stars, asteroids, gravity, space travel and more. Sessions of two days, three days or five days per week are offered Who: Ages 3 to 10 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., dates offered June 21 to Aug. 27 Cost: Ranges from $85 to $240 per week, depending on the number of sessions

SPORTS

Caramba Skills Soccer Camp Locations in Concord, Nashua, Chichester and Gilmanton, 496-3579, soccerskillscamp.org

What: Soccer program specializes in skill development for goaltenders, defenders, midfielders and strikers. Players are divided by age for the first half of the day, then by ability level for the second half. A high school preseason camp is also offered. Who: Grades 1 through 12 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, times vary depending on the location (half-day option available), dates offered July 12 through Aug. 5 Cost: Starts at $125 per week (price increases after March 20)

Challenger Sports Soccer Camps Various NH locations, 401-864-8880, challengersports.com

What: Campers will develop core soccer skills and understanding of the game as well as sportsmanship and leadership skills. Who: All ages When: Sessions run Monday to Friday Cost: Varies, depending on the type of camp and the location

Health Club of Concord Camps10 Garvins Falls Road, Concord, 224-7787, healthclubofconcord.com

What: Programs include basketball, volleyball, tennis, swimming, field games, arts and crafts and group activities. Who: Ages 5 to 12 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., dates offered June 21 to Aug. 20 Cost: Call for details

NH Climbing & Fitness 10 Langdon Ave., Concord, 715-9171, nhclimbinggym.com/camp

What: Programs include Summer Indoor Camp (ages 6 to 12), in which campers can learn basic top-rope climbing, and NH Adventure Camp (ages 10 and up), in which campers take hiking-based field trips across the state. Who: Ages 6 and up When: Sessions for the Summer Indoor Camp are held Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., dates offered June 28 through Aug. 20. Sessions for NH Adventure Camp are held Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., dates offered June 28 through Aug. 20 (climbing gear is included). Cost: Summer Indoor Camp is $260 per week. NH Adventure Camp is $460 per week.

Foster’s Golf Camp Derryfield Park, 581 Bridge St., Manchester, 622-1553, fostersgolfcamp.com

What: Campers travel to different par-3 courses across New Hampshire and participate in practice clinics, chipping and putting contests, time on the driving range and at least nine holes of golf with instruction. Trophies and certificates are awarded at the end of the session. Drop-offs and pick-ups are at Derryfield Park. Golf camps take place at a variety of locations, depending on the day of the week. Who: Ages 7 to 16 of all experience levels When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., dates offered June 21 through Aug. 27 Cost: $295 per week

Granite State Lacrosse Camp Joppa Hill Fields, 176 Joppa Hill Road, Bedford; 867-9421, granitestatelacrosse.com

What: Boys of all abilities and positions will learn lacrosse skills and take part in full-field games to work on team concepts taught earlier in the day. Each camp also features a goalie school. Who: Boys ages 5 to 17 When: Three sessions run from Monday through Thursday, dates offered June 28 to July 1, July 12 to July 15 and July 26 to July 29 Cost: $195 per session

Junior Fitness Camp Executive Health and Sports Center, 1 Executive Way, Manchester, 624-9300, ext. 206, ehsc.com

What: Campers receive instruction in tennis, golf and basketball and will take classes in yoga, Zumba and healthy eating. They also participate in group exercise classes, arts and crafts, team games and outdoor pool. Who: Ages 5 through 12 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., dates offered June 21 through Aug. 13 Cost: Call for details

NH Tomahawks Girls Lacrosse Camp Back River Sports Complex, 15 Camp Allen Road, Bedford; Joppa Hill Fields, 176 Joppa Hill Road, Bedford; girls.nhtomahawks.com

What: Players will be divided by position, age and ability, and will focus on improving fundamental skills in lacrosse, including offensive moves, shooting, cutting, feeding and one-on-one defense. Goalies will have specific training and integrate in with the rest of the camp for game play. Who: Girls ages 5 to 17 When: Three weekly sessions run from 9 a.m. to noon this year, dates offered Monday, June 28, through Thursday, July 1; Monday, July 12, through Thursday, July 15; and Monday, July 26, through Thursday, July 29 Cost: $175 for each session

Nike Basketball Camps Locations in Derry, Hampton, Manchester and Nashua, 800-645-3226, ussportscamps.com/basketball/nike

What: Camp for basketball players who want to improve their skills. Includes lectures, team games and daily emphasis on fundamental development. Who: Co-ed ages 8 through 16 When: Most sessions run Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Friday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., dates offered June 21 through Aug. 6 (varies depending on the location) Cost: Ranges from $285 to $325, depending on the session and location

Pro Ambitions Hockey Day Camps Tri-Town Ice Arena, 311 W. River Road, Hooksett; Conway Arena, 5 Stadium Drive, Nashua; proambitions.com

What: At the Battle Camp, players learn skating skills and game theory elements while engaging in a situational battle. The Boston Bruins Camp features training in all aspects of ice hockey, plus daily appearances and autograph sessions with members of the Boston Bruins organization. A goaltending camp is also offered. Who: Ages 6 through 16 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. or 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., dates offered July 5 through July 23. See website for full schedule Cost: Generally ranges from $549 to $699, depending on the camp

THEATER

Bedford Youth Performing Co. 155 Route 101, Bedford, 472-3894, bypc.org/dance-musicaltheatre

What: Preschool camps are offered for ages 3 through 6 with themes including Kindermusik, At the Circus, In Motion, Outdoor Discovery, Super Heroes. Camps offered for ages 6 through 13 include a Moana Production, Taste of Broadway, Acro Circus, Finding Nemo Production and Musical Theatre Performer’s Tool Kit. Who: Ages 3 through 13. When: Preschool camps run Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., dates offered June 14 through Aug. 6. Other camps run Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 or 4 p.m., dates offered June 21 through Aug. 20. Cost: $250 for preschool camps, $295 for all other camps

The Derryfield School Repertory Theatre Camp 2108 River Road, Manchester, 641-9426, derryfield.org/summer/theatre-camp

What: Campers will practice acting, singing, dance, script writing and improvisation techniques and participate in performance opportunities. Who: Grades 3 through 12 When: Sessions run Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., dates offered July 5 through July 30 Cost: $575

The Majestic Theatre 880 Page St., Manchester, 669-7469, majestictheatre.net

What: Campers will learn the basics of music, theater and dance. Themes include Time Machine: Around the World and Beyond; It’s a Jungle; Peter Pan: A Musical Adventure; and Bots: A New Children’s Musical. Who: Ages 5 through 14, depending on the camp When: Days and times vary, depending on the camp, dates offered July 5 through Aug. 7 Cost: Ranges from $160 to $325, depending on the camp

Merrimack Summer Stage Wasserman Park Theater, 116 Naticook Road, Merrimack, hosted by Merrimack Parks & Recreation, 882-1046, merrimackparksandrec.org/merrimack-summer-stage What: Campers will learn about scene acting, vocal work, dance and creative movement, theater games and improvisation and work together to produce and perform Disney’s Aladdin Jr. Who: Ages 8 through 14 When: Monday, July 12, through Friday, July 16, 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Cost: $200 for Merrimack residents and $210 for non-residents. Sibling discounts are also available.

Triple Threat Theater Camp Londonderry Dance Academy, 21 Buttrick Road, Londonderry, 432-0032, triplethreattheatercamp.com

What: Camps focus on the core aspects of theater, including acting, dancing and voice. Led by experienced theater educators, directors and choreographers, campers will participate in workshops and rehearsals to prepare for a public performance at the end of the session. Who: Ages 5 1/2 to 17 When: Three-week program for ages 7 through 17 runs July 12 through July 30, 8:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. A Junior Program for ages 5 1/2 through 9 is offered Monday, July 12, through Friday, July 16, 8:45 a.m. to noon Cost: $175 for Junior Program, $825 for three-week program.

Details to come

The following camps have confirmed that they will be hosting a camp but the details have yet to be announced. Call or visit their websites for up-to-date information.

Barbara C. Harris Episcopal Camp (108 Wally Stone Lane, Greenfield, 547-3400, bchcenter.org/camp) General interest camp. Details TBA on its website by March 31.

Boys & Girls Club of Greater Nashua (1 Positive Place, Nashua; Camp Doucet, Ridge Road, Nashua; 883-1074, bgcn.com) General interest camp. Details TBA.

Concord Community Music School (23 Wall St., Concord, 228-1196, ccmusicschool.org) Music camp. Details TBA.

Nashua Parks and Recreation (589-3370, nashua.recdesk.com/community/home) General interest camp. Details TBA on its website this month.

Peacock Players Theatre Camp (Nashua, 886-7000, peacockplayers.org) Theater camp. Details TBA.

Project SMART (University of New Hampshire, 46 College Road, Durham, 862-3205, smart.unh.edu) Academic enrichment camp with a focus on math and science. Details TBA.

Featured photo: Camp Lovewell. Courtesy photo.

Small acts of kindness

14 ways to spread a little happiness this Valentine’s season

This Valentine’s Day, spread the love without spreading Covid with these acts of kindness that you can do right from home (or just outside your home). From leaving a small gift in your mailbox for your mail carrier to giving the critters in your backyard a place to escape the cold, here are 14 ways to bring some joy to family and friends, local businesses, and people and animals in need, all from a safe distance.

By Matt Ingersoll & Angie Sykeny

Purchase a wish list item for a local charity

For a more personal way to lend a hand than just donating money, most charities in the Granite State will post a “wish list” accessible on their website, kept up to date with items of the greatest need. Some also provide a link to an Amazon Wish List page as well — items can be ordered online and shipped directly to that organization’s address.

Marguerite’s Place, for instance, a transitional living program in Nashua for women and children in crisis, is in need of basic home essentials like laundry detergent, towels, trash cans and storage bins. The full wish list is available to view on the website, according to director of development and public relations Christa Tsechrintzis, with an additional link to Amazon to help you choose the right product brands.

The Concord Coalition to End Homelessness, office administrator Teri Gladstone said, is in the greatest need of boots, ski gloves, jackets and other hand, foot and body warmers.

“Due to Covid restrictions by the CDC, we can only accept brand new clothing items,” she said. Items can be shipped to its temporary location, at the First Congregational Church of Concord.

Pick up litter

Show some love to the environment by picking up litter around your neighborhood. “Picking up litter not only helps make the environment safer and healthier for people, but also for the plants and animals in the community,” said Kimberly McCloy of Litter Crew (littercrew.com), a group of New Hampshire residents who are working to make the state litter-free. “Even if you only spend five minutes a day, it will make a noticeable difference.” All you need is some gloves and a trash bag, she said, and beware of any litter that could be hazardous to you, such as needles or any items that have been in contact with bodily fluids. “You can contact your local authorities to come dispose of these items safely,” McCloy said.

Send a care package overseas

Make the day of an Army, Navy or other military branch member from New Hampshire who is currently serving overseas by assembling and sending your own special care package.

Deborah Luszey of Operation Care for Troops, a nonprofit based in Nashua, has worked to send care packages out to local troops since around 17 years ago, when her son was first deployed to Iraq.

She said the process starts with obtaining a flat rate shipping box — you can order military service kits online for free from the United States Postal Service and have them shipped directly to you. The kits include address labels, custom envelopes and enough tape for six boxes.

Many of the most requested contents you can fill your care package with may also be items you already have in your home.

“It’s usually very dry where they are, so a lot of times you can put some lotions or some hydration products in the box,” Luszey said. “Food is also a great thing, so things like protein bars, beef jerky, peanut butter, coffee [and] tea. We’ve done canned fruit. … Zip-lock bags can be good, because you can roll them up tight and oftentimes they’ll reuse them for other things.”

You could even include a handwritten letter, or puzzles cut out of newspapers or magazines.

“Anything you can do to just give them five minutes where they can be somewhere else from where they are,” she said. “You can get friends or your kids to draw pictures … and put that stuff on top so that it’s the first thing they see when they open it up.”

Although Operation Care for Troops organizes several bulk shipping events, the next of which is scheduled for late March at the Hudson Fire Department’s Burns Hill Road fire station, care packages can be sent at any time. More details can be found at octnh.org, or you can email Luszey directly at deborah@octnh.org.

Foster a pet

If you want to help a pet in need but don’t have the means to give it a forever home, consider fostering, which allows you to care for an animal at your home temporarily until it gets adopted or can return to the shelter. Since kittens cannot be sold or adopted until they are at least eight weeks old, according to New Hampshire law, foster homes are most commonly needed for pregnant and mother cats and their kittens until the kittens are old enough to return to the shelter and be put up for adoption.

“In order to provide for these kittens and nursing feline mothers, we need a strong cadre of foster homes ready and able to take these creatures into their homes,” says the New Hampshire Humane Society website.

Fostering protocol varies from shelter to shelter, but the most standard requirements are that you own your home or have permission from your landlord to foster a pet; any other pets currently living in your home are up to date on their vaccinations; and you have a space where you can secure the foster pets from other pets or young children in your home. Check with your local animal shelter to see if they have any pets in need of foster homes.

Buy Girl Scout cookies for someone

It’s Girl Scout cookie season, and this year for the first time you can also get Girl Scout cookies delivered through GrubHub. Go to girlscoutcookies.org, where you can enter in any street address for them to be shipped to.

“[The cookies] are $5 per package, with proceeds staying right in the troop you ordered from,” said Ginger Kozlowski, communications manager of the Girl Scouts of the Green and White Mountains.

She said it normally takes anywhere between two and 15 business days for your shipped order to arrive at its destination.

The Girl Scouts of the Green and White Mountains also has a Gift of Caring program, which gives you the opportunity to buy cookies to donate to military service members and hometown heroes, like firefighters, police officers and EMTs. Visit girlscoutsgwm.org for details.

Knit for a cause

Use your knitting or crocheting skills to help someone in need. New Hampshire volunteer groups like Neighbors Helping Newborns, Stitching up the World and the New Hampshire chapters of Project Linus collect donations of handmade knitted and crocheted items like blankets, caps, scarves and shawls and distribute them to patients at local cancer centers, premature babies at local hospitals and children dealing with illness or trauma. “We’ve had people as far away as Arizona donate hats for cancer patients,” Stitching up the World’s website states. “We gladly accept completed items and will make sure they get to the proper destination.” If you need some inspiration, the groups also have a variety of patterns for knitted and crocheted items online.

Donate life

There are more than 5,000 people in New England waiting for a life-saving organ transplant, according to the Donate Life New England website. Registering to be an organ donor means that, in the event of your death, your organs could add years of life or provide a better quality of life to as many as 50 people. If you aren’t yet registered, you don’t have to wait until the next time you renew your driver’s license or go to the DMV in person; you can do it right from home in minutes online at dmv.org/nh-new-hampshire/organ-donorregistering. Not only could you be helping people in need of an organ transplant, but you could also, in a different way, be helping your grieving loved ones, said Susan Diggins, RN, Quality Management Coordinator of the Center for Quality & Safety at Southern New Hampshire Health. “We understand [a death] is a difficult time for family members,” Diggins said, “but knowing their loved one’s death may help another person brings some level of comfort to them.”

Leave a gift for your neighborhood mail carrier

Even though ethics guidelines prohibit postal employees from accepting cash from customers, or any gifts with a value greater than $20 per household, there are still all kinds of small gestures you can make to show your gratitude for your local mail carrier.

“We have seen a swell recently in homemade cards and window or lawn signs, sometimes created by children … to show their appreciation,” said Steve Doherty, strategic communications specialist for the United States Postal Service’s Northeast Region. “Around the holidays many people will reward their carrier with a small gift, such as a mug or tie, or a gift card to a local restaurant or coffee shop.”

If you know your neighborhood letter carrier personally, Doherty said, treats like home baked goods or store-bought candy can make good gifts. In the past year homemade masks, small hand sanitizer bottles and even rolls of toilet paper have become common, he said.

Talk on the phone to someone stuck at home

You can help someone who has experienced loneliness from the pandemic just by picking up the phone and talking to them — in fact, that’s exactly one of the tasks you can volunteer to perform through the CareGivers, a program of Catholic Charities New Hampshire that services clients over the age of 62 in the Greater Manchester and Nashua areas.

They’re known as reassurance calls, according to CareGivers executive director Jim Wilkie, and they’re one of several volunteer opportunities you can sign up for, in addition to sending birthday cards to clients, delivering groceries to their doorstep and driving them to medical appointments.

“With the pandemic, we’ve recognized the need to really reach out to our clients that have been stuck at home and feeling really isolated,” Wilkie said.

He said volunteers may be given a short list of phone numbers of clients who have expressed interest in receiving calls, talking once or a few times a week and building relationships.

“We always hear these little narratives … from people sharing their happy moments and just talking about their lives,” he said.

Have a meal delivered to a family member or essential worker

Give a relative, friend or essential employee the gift of delicious food right on their doorstep. Local Baskit in Concord is offering online options for gift meals to be delivered to local health care workers and first responders, as well as to tip delivery drivers — go to shop.localbaskit.com and click the “tipping/donation” tab for details. Owner Beth Richards said she’s arranged for meals to be delivered to employees at Concord Hospital and at Merrimack County Nursing Home in Boscawen, as well as to the local fire department.

“It can be either a meal kit or prepared food option from one of the selections that we have that week,” Richards said of the available meals.

Ding Dong Deliver, a ghost kitchen launched last year by Great New Hampshire Restaurants, provides ready-to-heat meal packages to all addresses in Manchester and Bedford.

“We’ve seen a lot of people with older parents who aren’t going out do dinner use Ding Dong Deliver, and even Realtors who gift the meals to new homeowners,” said Nicole Barreira, director of marketing and menu development for Great New Hampshire Restaurants. Deliveries are made on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, between 1 and 5 p.m.

Make backyard friends

Show some kindness to the critters in your yard by providing them with places to shelter. According to research by the UNH Cooperative Extension provided by Natural Resources Field Specialist Wendy Scribner, there are around 45 species of birds and mammals in New England that use cavities in trees and other wood materials and structures for denning, roosting and nesting. You can lay out some logs or brush piles, or install a birdhouse or bat house.Bats can be a bit picky, so if you’re new to bat houses, be sure to do some research first. (Scribner recommends Bat Conservation International as a resource for building, buying and installing bat houses; visit batcon.org/about-bats/bat-houses.) Making your property more hospitable to wildlife benefits not only the animals, Scribner said, but also yourself if you’re someone who enjoys having nature around. “There is joy in being able to watch wildlife, birds, and, yes, the squirrels too, and feel that you are helping them,” she said. “Most of all, you will enjoy the opportunity to see and appreciate the creatures with whom you share your land.”

Order a personalized gift basket

You don’t need a special reason to show a friend, family member or even your local mail carrier that you appreciate them. Caring Gifts in Concord takes orders for its own specialty or customized gift baskets and packages for all occasions, including “just because.”

“People can call or email us … and we ask them how much they want to spend, or maybe they give us a dollar amount, and then we go from there,” shop co-owner Donna Mark said. “We can ship nationwide and we deliver within the greater Concord and Manchester area.”

The shop has several of its own themed baskets and packages to choose from that will often feature foods or personal care items — a movie lover’s package, for instance, features a jumbo popcorn box filled with caramel corn, chips, candy and cookies, while others can include wine bottles, crackers, bath gels, soaps and more.

“We recently did one for a corporate gathering where we shipped small bottles of sparkling cider or Champagne and different snacks … and they enjoyed them during a cocktail party they had over Zoom,” Mark said, “so they really can be for any occasion.”

The Manchester Craft Market, a store located inside the Mall of New Hampshire, features all kinds of locally made items that can also be shipped as gifts, according to owner Jessica Moores, including cookie mixes, jams and jellies, teas and coffees, maple products and more. Sellers post details on their items to a public Facebook group, which can be accessed through the shop’s website. Pop-up Facebook live sales are often featured too.

Make a mask

What better way to show someone you care during a pandemic than with a homemade mask? Seacoast Mask Makers, a group of New Hampshire volunteers who made masks for medical facilities and essential businesses when masks were in short supply, has written instructions and photo and video tutorials on its website for simple, pleated, and nose-fitting cloth masks. With some super basic sewing skills, you can make a simple mask with just a nine-inch by 12-inch piece of cotton fabric in a color or design you think your recipient would like, and a seven-inch-long piece of rope elastic or flat elastic. (For a pleated mask, you’ll need an eight-inch by 14-inch piece of fabric, and for a nose-fitting mask you’ll also need some flat plastic twist ties.) Visit seacoastmaskmakers.org/get-involved/#mask-making for the full instructions and tutorials and other mask-making information and resources.

Cherish memories

Send someone you’re missing this Valentine’s Day a personalized photo card or gift. “We are oftentimes reminding our customers that many photos they have on their phones … of friends, children, and events are memory makers that can make wonderful gifts for family and friends,” said Michael St. Germain, owner of Concord Photo Service. Through Concord Photo Service and other local shops that offer photo services, you can place an order online to turn your digital photos into a print, collage, canvas wall art or photo book, or have them printed on mugs, jewelry, T-shirts, calendars, ornaments and even face masks. “Items as simple as a custom card with a photo on the front can tell a story that we have forgotten,” Germain said.

Local animal shelters with foster programs
New Hampshire Humane Society (Laconia, 524-3252, nhhumane.org/adopt/foster)
• Salem Animal Rescue League (893-3210, sarlnh.org/foster)
• Pope Memorial SPCA (Concord, 856-8756, popememorialspca.org/volunteer)
• Humane Society for Greater Nashua (889-2275, hsfn.org/get-involved/volunteer)
• Manchester Animal Shelter (628-3544, manchesteranimalshelter.org/fosterform)
• Greater Derry Humane Society (434-1512, derryhumanesociety.com/we-need-volunteers/fostering-a-rescue-animal

And for your sweetheart…
There may still be time for you to get your Valentine’s Day reservations or takeout orders in – visit hippopress.com for our annual dine-in and takeout listings at local restaurants, candy shops, bakeries and more. Be sure to call or visit a participating eatery’s website directly for the most up-to-date availability.

Knitting and crocheting charity groups
• Neighbors Helping Newborns
(serves southern New Hampshire, 382-8504, neighborshelpingnewborns.org, donations will be held until March due to pandemic)
• Project Linus (projectlinus.org; facebook.com/nhseacoastprojectlinus; facebook.com/projectlinussouthwestnewhampshire; drop-off locations in Candia, Derry, Raymond, Concord, Goffstown, Henniker, Hooksett, Manchester, Milford, Nashua, the Seacoast and other parts of the state.
• Stitching Up the World (based in Candia, 587-0603, candiawomansgroup.org/stitching)

Photo prints and gifts
• Concord Photo Service
(31 N. Main St., Concord, 225-5891, concordphotoservice.com)
• Hunt’s Photo & Video (4 Vinton St., Manchester, 606-3322, huntsphotoandvideo.com)
• Chris Digital Photo Print (346 Merrimack St., Manchester, 264-6205, chrisdigitalphotoprint.business.site)
• EverPresent (99 Rockingham Park Blvd., Salem, 435-2202; 1301 Elm St., Manchester, 819-5182; 800 Islington St., Portsmouth, 967-4385; everpresent.com)

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