The Art Roundup 21/12/30

The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

Nashua arts venue gets an official name: The performing arts venue currently under construction in downtown Nashua formerly known as the Nashua Performing Arts Center has been renamed the Nashua Center for the Arts, Nashua Community Arts announced in a press release. The new name was chosen by a local anonymous donor who gave $1 million to the venue. “The center will be home to much more than theatrical and musical performances,” Nashua Community Arts board member Phillip Scontsas said in the release. “It will be hosting films, a variety of attractions like celebrity chefs and reality TV stars, recitals, and competitions … and art exhibitions in the gallery.”

Last call for holiday art: There’s still time to check out these holiday art exhibits.

Small Works — Big Impact,the annual holiday exhibit at Creative Ventures Gallery (411 Nashua St., Milford), is going on now through Friday, Dec. 31, in person at the gallery and virtually on the gallery’s website (creativeventuresfineart.com/product-category/small-works-show). The exhibit features non-juried small works of art in a variety of media and styles, created by area professional and nonprofessional artists, priced affordably for holiday gift buying. Visit creativeventuresfineart.com or call 672-2500.

The New Hampshire Art Association’s holiday exhibition, “Let it Snow,is upat the Robert Lincoln Levy Gallery (136 State St., Portsmouth) now through Sunday, Jan. 2. It includes works in a variety of media, as well as books and cards for sale. Gallery hours are Thursday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. Visit nhartassociation.org or call 431-4230.

Painting by Heather Morgan, featured in “The Dysfunction of Social Practice” exhibit at Kimball Jenkins Estate. Courtesy photo.

Theater auditions: Manchester-based Cue Zero Theatre Co. is looking for actors for two upcoming shows. Auditions for the March production of Deadly will be held on Sunday, Jan. 2, from 3 to 6 p.m., and Monday, Jan. 3, from 7 to 10 p.m., with callbacks on Wednesday, Jan. 5, in the evening. Deadly is a nine-person ensemble theater piece that uses movement in nine parts to explore the modern-day seven deadly sins. Auditions for the April production of Puffs! Or Seven Increasingly Eventful Years at a Certain School of Magic and Magic, a comedy about students at a magic school, will be held on Sunday, Jan. 16, and Monday, Jan. 17, from 7 to 10 p.m., with callbacks on Tuesday, Jan. 18, from 7 to 10 p.m. All auditions will take place in person at Granite State Arts Academy (19 Keewaydin Drive, No. 4, Salem). All performers must be at least 18 years old and must fill out an audition form online and sign up for a time slot in advance. Visit cztheatre.com or email cztheatre@gmail.com.

Exhibits at the Mansion: The Kimball Jenkins Estate (266 N. Main St., Concord) has two exhibitions up now through Jan. 14. “Salon 2021,” on view in the Carolyn Jenkins Gallery in the Carriage House, features a curated collection of offbeat and experimental small works in a variety of media by regional artists with diverse studio practices and artistic approaches. “The Dysfunction of Social Practice,” on view in the Jill C. Wilson Gallery in the Kimball Jenkins Mansion, is a collaboration between Kimball Jenkins and Manchester art gallery Kelley Stelling Contemporary, featuring paintings, sculpture and performance works by New Hampshire artists Zach Dewitt, Emmett Donlon, Rosemary Mack, Heather Morgan and Meghan Samson. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with evening and weekend visits available by request. Visit kelleystellingcontemporary.com and kimballjenkins.com, or call 225-3932.

Natural elements

The New Hampshire Art Association has an exhibition, “Impressions: Nature,” featuring the work of Allenstown artist Daniela Edstrom, on view now through Feb. 17 at the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center (49 S. Main St., Concord). Edstrom’s art explores the abstract qualities of light, form and color found in the New England landscape. “Sunlight and its play of light and shadow is perceived as halos of vibrating strokes and bold minimalist shapes,” the artist said in a press release. “Elements such as leaves, trees – the organic aspects of the woodland environment – are seen in emphatic primary colors and highlighted by gestural marks of rich complementary hues.” Gallery hours at the Chamber are Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. All works are for sale. Visit nhartassociation.org or call 431-4230.


ART

Exhibits

• “SMALL WORKS BIG IMPACT” Creative Ventures Gallery presents its annual holiday exhibit in-person at the gallery (411 Nashua St., Milford) and virtually on the gallery’s website (creativeventuresfineart.com/product-category/small-works-show). The exhibit features non-juried small works of art in a variety of media and styles, created by area professional and nonprofessional artists, priced affordably for holiday gift buying. Now through Dec. 31. Visit creativeventuresfineart.com or call 672-2500.

• “LET IT SNOW” The New Hampshire Art Association presents its holiday exhibition. Robert Lincoln Levy Gallery (136 State St., Portsmouth). Now through Jan. 2. Features works in a variety of media, as well as books and cards for sale. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. Visit nhartassociation.org.

EMILY NOELLE LAMBERT Solo exhibition by New York City artist Emily Noelle Lambert. Dana Center for the Humanities at Saint Anselm College (100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester). On view now through Jan. 9. Masks required inside the gallery. Visit anselm.edu/dana-center-humanities or call 641-7700.

• “THE DYSFUNCTION OF SOCIAL PRACTICE” Kelley Stelling Contemporary presents an exhibition featuring paintings, sculpture and performance works by five New Hampshire artists. Kimball Jenkins Estate (266 N. Main St., Concord). Now through Jan. 14. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with evening and weekend visits available by request. Visit kelleystellingcontemporary.com.

• “SALON 2021” Exhibition features offbeat and experimental works in a variety of media by regional artists with diverse studio practices and artistic approaches. The Kimball Jenkins Estate (266 N. Main St., Concord, 225-3932, kimballjenkins.com). Now through Jan. 14. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with evening and weekend visits available by request.

• “BIG GIFTS IN SMALL PACKAGES” The Seacoast Artist Association’s annual holiday exhibit, featuring a variety of small works of art priced under $100 for gift buying. Now through Jan. 7. 130 Water St., Exeter. Gallery hours are Wednesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, from 1 to 4 p.m. Visit seacoastartist.org or call 778-8856.

• “AS PRECIOUS AS GOLD: CARPETS FROM THE ISLAMIC WORLD” Exhibit features 32 carpets dating from the 15th century to the 19th century. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On view now through Feb. 27, 2022. Museum admission tickets cost $15, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, and must be booked online. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

• “1,000 CRANES FOR NASHUA” Featuring more than 1,000 origami paper cranes created by hundreds of Nashua-area kids, adults and families since April. On display now at The Atrium at St. Joseph Hospital, 172 Kinsley St., Nashua. Visit nashuasculpturesymposium.org.

• “NEW HAMPSHIRE NOW” A collaborative photography project presented by the New Hampshire Historical Society and the New Hampshire Society of Photographic Artists, on display in eight exhibitions at museums and historical societies across the state. Nearly 50 photographers participated in the project, taking more than 5,000 photos of New Hampshire people, places, culture and events from 2018 to 2020 to create a 21st-century portrait of life in the Granite State. Exhibition locations include Belknap Mill Society in Laconia; Colby-Sawyer College in New London; Portsmouth Historical Society; Historical Society of Cheshire County in Keene; the Manchester Historic Association; Museum of the White Mountains at Plymouth State University; and the Tillotson Center in Colebrook; with the flagship exhibition at the New Hampshire Historical Society in Concord. Visit newhampshirenow.org and nhhistory.org.

Tours

NASHUA PUBLIC ART AUDIO TOUR Self-guided audio tours of the sculptures and murals in downtown Nashua, offered via the Distrx app, which uses Bluetooth iBeacon technology to automatically display photos and text and provides audio descriptions at each stop on the tour as tourists approach the works of art. Each tour has 10 to 15 stops. Free and accessible on Android and iOS on demand. Available in English and Spanish. Visit downtownnashua.org/nashua-art-tour.

Workshops and classes

WINTER ART CLASSES Art classes for teens and adults, including Pottery, Stained Glass, Intermediate Watercolor and Clay Hand Building. Studio 550 Art Center (550 Elm St., Manchester). Five-week sessions. Classes met for two hours a week. Call 232-5597 or visit 550arts.com for the full schedule and cost details.

GENERAL ART CLASSES In-person art classes for all levels and two-dimensional media. held with small groups of two to five students. Private classes are also available. Diane Crespo Fine Art Gallery (32 Hanover St., Manchester). Students are asked to wear masks in the gallery. Tuition costs $20 per group class and $28 per private class, with payment due at the beginning of the class. Call 493-1677 or visit dianecrespofineart.com for availability.

DRAWING & PAINTING CLASSES Art House Studios, 66 Hanover St., Suite 202, Manchester. Classes include Drawing Fundamentals, Painting in Acrylic, Drawing: Observation to Abstraction, Exploring Mixed Media, and Figure Drawing. Class sizes are limited to six students. Visit arthousestudios.org.

THEATER

Shows

SCENE CHANGES Produced by New World Theatre. The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Jan. 7 through Jan. 23. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

Classical

NEW YEAR’S EVE CHAMPAGNE POPS The Portsmouth Symphony Orchestra presents its New Year’s Eve concert. The Music Hall Historic Theater (28 Chestnut St., Portsmouth). Fri., Dec. 31, at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $38. Visit themusichall.org or call 436-2400.

Arts alive! (really)

Theater and art groups rally in 2021

Well, it was better than 2020 — that’s the sentiment that many in the art community had about 2021, as they continued to try to evolve among the ebbs and flows of the pandemic.

“All arts organizations have faced tremendous challenges in bringing live performances and art experiences to the public,” Alan Chong, Director of the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester, said. “We have all learned to adapt and be flexible.”

Here’s how some artistic groups fared in 2021, and a look at what they think 2022 might bring.

Art

For some organizations, 2021 meant bringing back some sorely missed in-person events. The League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, for example, was able to hold its annual fair in Sunapee, with a few modifications that prioritized social distancing.

“We were really delighted that the fair was a total success and people felt comfortable coming,” said Miriam Carter, executive director of the League.

Carter said the artists did very well, with an increase in sales from $2.35 million in 2019 — the last time the fair was held in person — to $2.74 million in 2021.

“People came ready to buy,” Carter said. “It was incredibly heartening.”

The Currier Museum of Art in Manchester has faced financial challenges from being closed for most of 2020 and much of 2021, according to Chong, but it was able to reopen in 2021 with a special exhibition called “The Body in Art,” which looked at images of nudes from different perspectives, like gender, culture and time period.

“The museum also acquired a second house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright just before the pandemic,” Chong said. “We were so happy to be able to open both houses to the public in 2021.”

The museum is now offering free admission for all on Thursday nights, with live music, tours and refreshments.

Joni Taube, owner of Art 3 gallery, also re-opened her studio to the public this year, changing her hours to 1 to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, with other times open by appointment. Taube, who does art design consulting for individuals and businesses, said that at the beginning of the pandemic she had to adapt how she showed the work in her gallery by hosting virtual show openings, and that has continued in 2021 because her space is too small for gatherings. She said she may have 70 to 80 artists showing at one time, with the majority of the works being paintings, along with some glass, ceramics and metal pieces. In working with so many artists, Taube has heard a range of reactions to the pandemic.

“Artists are doing more experimenting because they’re in their studios all the time now,” she said. “Some are frustrated because the galleries are closed. Many of them have way too much work in their studios that they’d like to find an outlet for. … Some are hunkered down and painting and happy. … I think that’s how a lot of them coped.”

Taube said she thinks it has been difficult financially for artists, which is one of the reasons she started posting work online.

“You try different things for them [like] social media [and putting] shows online so the artists feel like their work is getting exposure,” she said.

The League of New Hampshire Craftsmen was able to reopen its smaller galleries, and Carter said the artists who display their work there have been well-supported by the public.

“Shopping local has really started to stick,” Carter said. “There seems to be a mindset to support the local talent. … [I think] that’s a direct impact of Covid.”

Looking ahead, Carter said the League is already preparing for the 2022 fair and will be ready to adapt if needed.

“At headquarters we’re really excited to be returning to opening our exhibition gallery, [which has been] closed since [the start of the pandemic],” she said.

The gallery will open Jan. 20 with a three-day exhibition of Art & Bloom by the Concord Garden Club. It will then open for regular hours starting Jan. 25 on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from noon to 4 p.m. A new exhibition called “Setting the Standard,” featuring new work from League jurors in all media areas, will be on display at that time.

At the Currier, Chong said they’re watching the omicron variant situation carefully and will make decisions based on keeping the community safe.

“We are continuing to push experiences [like] remote art classes and educational resources,” Chong said.

A new exhibition featuring the work of Arghavan Khosravi is scheduled to open in April, according to Chong, and the Currier will also be showing Warhol Screen Tests: “short film snippets made in the 1960s that prefigure our selfie culture,” he said.

Art 3 Gallery currently has a show that will be up for another few weeks called “Artful Escapes.”

Taube is hoping to have some in-person opening receptions next year but knows that as with this year, everything can change at any time.

“I don’t know what 2022 is going to bring,” she said. “I’m hoping that people start coming out more and looking again at art, thinking about spaces, decor and how they want to live and have an appreciation of what people go through in terms of forming a piece of artwork.”

Theater

Still reeling from a huge loss of income after the months-long shutdowns in 2020, New Hampshire performance companies and venues spent 2021 recuperating and trying to regain some stability.

Salvatore Prizio, who became the Executive Director of the Capitol Center for the Arts in Concord last fall, said financial difficulty is the biggest challenge to come with his new position.

“One of the major issues CCA and all performing arts centers are facing now is getting back on their feet [financially],” he told the Hippo in November. “They have a lot of fiscal issues from being shut down for months.”

As restrictions on public gatherings were eased, many performance companies and venues saw an opportunity to increase revenue by expanding their programming options as much as possible, to accommodate people with all levels of Covid safety concerns.

“New Hampshire Theatre Project moved to a variety of alternative formats last year, including livestream and on-demand programming as well as in-person and outdoor performances,” said Genevieve Aichele, executive director of the Portsmouth-based company, which had lost 75 percent of its income in 2020, according to Aichele.

The Hatbox Theatre in Concord reopened with its first in-person mainstage production of the year in early summer. With masks required and seats distanced, the venue was able to operate at around 85 percent capacity.

“[Having in-person shows] enables us to … get to a point where productions not only break even but might actually come out ahead a little for their next production,” theater owner and operator Andrew Pinard told the Hippo in June.

Manchester-based Cue Zero Theatre Company was one of a number of local companies and venues that utilized a hybrid format for its performances, allowing people to attend in person or watch from home via livestream.

“Being able to offer streaming alongside the in-person performances created new opportunities for us to reach both a wider audience as well as keep our local audiences feeling safe and comfortable,” Cue Zero artistic director Dan Pelletier said, adding that the company “had a successful 2021, all things considered.”

The New Hampshire theater community also took time in 2021 to celebrate the technology and experimental forms of performance that have kept them going through the pandemic.

“The pandemic has truly redefined the way theater artists make work,” said Matt Cahoon, artist director of Theatre Kapow in Manchester. “We feel very fortunate to have found ways to innovate.”

Powerhouse Theatre Collaborative in Laconia, for example, teamed up with the Community Players of Concord in April to host a Zoom Play Festival, featuring a series of new short plays by New Hampshire playwrights, written specifically for performance over the Zoom video chat platform; and the theme of New Hampshire Theatre Project’s annual Storytelling Festival, held in the spring virtually and in person in Portsmouth, was “What Are You Waiting For?” — a theme inspired, Aichele said, by the innovation of the arts community during the pandemic.

“It’s a new world; we can’t do art the way we used to,” Aichele told the Hippo in April, “so why not use Covid as an opportunity to reinvent ourselves? What are we waiting for? That’s really what these stories are about — not waiting to act or make a change.”

Heading into the new year, performance companies and venues are hopeful that they can continue to present shows in person, but are at the ready to go fully virtual again, should restrictions on public gatherings be reinstated.

“We are well aware that we may need to return to virtual performances at some point in the future, but truly feel prepared to make that transition if need be,” Cahoon said, adding that Theater Kapow is “also working hard to incorporate many of the lessons we have learned and the technology we have acquired into our in-person performances.”

Some companies and venues have had so much success with their virtual programming that they plan to offer it, in addition to their in-person programming, indefinitely, regardless of the Covid situation.

“Digital media … is going to be a long-term component of performing arts centers,” Prizio told the Hippo in November. “That’s going to be critical for us down the road. It’s a way we can reach a wider audience and allow people who might not have the opportunity to get to our physical space, like some of the folks living in senior centers, for example, to experience art from the comfort of their own home.”

Many theater directors are optimistic about the future of community theater, even in the face of uncertainty.

“2021 brought new challenges, but also new opportunities, and we are a stronger company because of it,” said Rob Dionne, artistic director of Majestic Theatre in Manchester. “We are looking forward to seeing our audiences grow again in 2022.”

“We know the challenges of Covid are not going away,” Pelletier added, “but we look forward to traversing them with our audiences into a new landscape where we can continue to create our brand of theater and art.”

Things to look forward to in 2022

ART
• “Setting the Standard”: A new exhibition at League of New Hampshire Craftsmen headquarters in Concord that will feature new work from League jurors in all media areas will be open to guests Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from noon to 4 p.m. starting Jan. 25. Visit nhcrafts.org.
Arghavan Khosravi exhibition: The Currier Museum of Art in Manchester will host an exhibition featuring the work of Arghavan Khosravi, “an immensely talented artist whose challenging images have a striking surrealist quality,” according to museum director Alan Chong. The opening date will be announced soon. Visit currier.org.

THEATER
• The Majestic Academy of Dramatic Arts presents a Young Performers’s Edition of The Wizard of Oz at the Derry Opera House (29 W. Broadway, Derry), with showtimes on Friday, Jan. 28, and Saturday, Jan. 29, at 7 p.m., and Sunday, Jan. 30, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $15 for adults, $12 for seniors age 65 and up and $10 for students age 17 and under. Call 669-7469 or visit majestictheatre.net.
• Glass Dove Productions presents Mary and Me at the Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord) from Jan. 28 through Feb. 13. The original play by Irene Kelleher, inspired by a true story, follows a pregnant 15-year-old girl and her search for understanding while growing up in 1986 Ireland. Tickets cost $22 for adults and $19 for seniors and students. Visit hatboxnh.com or call 715-2315.
• The Riverbend Youth Company will perform The Lion King Jr. at the Amato Center for the Performing Arts (56 Mont Vernon St., Milford), with showtimes on Friday, Feb. 4, at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Feb. 5, at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday, Feb. 6, at 2:30 p.m. Tickets will go on sale in early January. Visit amatocenter.org/riverbend-youth-company.
• Cue Zero Theatre Co. presents Deadly, an original movement-based theater piece by Crystal Rose Welch, at Granite State Arts Academy (19 Keewaydin Drive, No. 4, Salem), with showtimes Friday, March 4, through Sunday, March 6. With a nine-person ensemble, Deadly uses movement to explore the modern-day seven deadly sins. Visit cztheatre.com
• The Franklin Footlight Theatre presents a production of Little Women at the Franklin Opera House (316 Central St., Franklin) with showtimes on Thursday, March 10, through Saturday, March 12, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, March 13, at 2 p.m. Based on Louisa May Alcott’s classic 1869 novel, the play follows the adventures of four sisters living with their mother in Massachusetts while their father is fighting in the Civil War. Tickets cost $16 for adults and $14 for students and seniors. Visit franklinoperahouse.org or call 934-1901.
• The Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) presents a mainstage production of Bye Bye Birdie from March 11 through April 3. The musical comedy, set in 1958 small-town America, centers around teen heartthrob Conrad Birdie, who has been drafted into the Army and announces that he will give one girl from his fan club a goodbye-kiss before reporting for duty. Tickets range from $25 to $46. Visit palacetheatre.org or call 668-5588.

Featured Photo: Untitled by Arghavan Khosravi. Courtesy photo.

The Art Roundup 21/12/23

The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

Still time for art gifts: If you’re still doing some last-minute gift shopping, these arts and craft shows have you covered.

Small Works —Big Impact, the annual holiday exhibit at Creative Ventures Gallery (411 Nashua St., Milford), is going on now through Dec. 31, in person at the gallery and virtually on the gallery’s website (creativeventuresfineart.com/product-category/small-works-show). The exhibit features non-juried small works of art in a variety of media and styles, created by area professional and nonprofessional artists, priced affordably for holiday gift buying. Visit creativeventuresfineart.com or call 672-2500.

Two Villages Art Society’s (46 Main St., Contoocook) Holiday Art Show and Sale will be open on Thursday, Dec. 23, from noon to 4 p.m., featuring handmade gifts by more than 30 local artists, including paintings, pottery, mixed media, photography, fabric art and more. Visit twovillagesart.org or email info@twovillagesart.org.

The Craftworkers’ Guild’s Holiday Fair is still open for online shopping and will be open for in-person shopping at the historic Kendall House (3A Meetinghouse Road, Bedford) on Thursday, Dec. 23, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. You’ll find seasonal decor, photography, fine art and prints, cards, gourmet treats, woodworking, fiber and fabric, stained and fused glass, mixed media, jewelry and more by juried local artists and craftspeople. Visit craftworkersguild.org.

The Seacoast Artist Association’s holiday exhibit, “Big Gifts in Small Packages,is open at the gallery (130 Water St., Exeter) on Thursday, Dec. 23, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday, Dec. 24, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sunday, Dec. 26, Wednesday, Dec. 29, and Thursday, Dec. 30, from 1 to 4 p.m. The exhibit features a variety of small works of art priced under $100 for gift buying. Visit seacoastartist.org or call 778-8856.

The New Hampshire Art Association presents its holiday exhibition, “Let it Snow,” at the Robert Lincoln Levy Gallery (136 State St., Portsmouth) through Jan. 2. It includes works in a variety of media, as well as books and cards for sale. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. Visit nhartassociation.org or call 431-4230.

New Year’s music: Get your tickets now for The Portsmouth Symphony Orchestra’s annual New Year’s Eve Champagne Pops concert, which will be held at the Music Hall Historic Theater (28 Chestnut St., Portsmouth) on Friday, Dec. 31, at 8 p.m. The concert will feature special guest conductor Dr. Dirk Hillyer and guest vocalist Jacyn Tremblay, with music ranging from Broadway to Hollywood, including selections from Frozen, The Greatest Showman, Cabaret, Chicago, The Godfather, West Side Story and a collection of Gershwin swing pieces. Tickets cost $38. Attendees will be required to show proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test. Visit themusichall.org or call 436-2400.

Last call for classics: There are still a couple of opportunities to catch the traditional Nutcracker or A Christmas Carol this holiday season.

The New Hampshire School of Ballet will perform The Nutcracker Suite at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) on Sunday, Dec. 26, at 6 p.m. Tickets cost $22. Visit palacetheatre.org or call 668-5588.

The Players’ Ring Theatre (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth) has its final showtime for A Christmas Carol on Thursday, Dec. 23, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $25 for adults, $22 for students and seniors age 65 and up and $15 for kids under age 12. Visit playersring.org or call 436-8123.

Festive painting

Muse Paintbar (42 Hanover St., Manchester) is offering family-friendly and adult paint-and-sip painting classes with a variety of winter and holiday themes now through December. Projects include a snow-capped sunset and Buddy the Elf on Thursday, Dec. 23, a white frosted eve on Sunday, Dec. 26, penguins at play on Wednesday, Dec. 29 and more. The cost ranges from $20 to $45, depending on the class. Visit musepaintbar.com to see the full schedule and book a class.

Handmade gifts: The Sanbornton Community Arts Festival will take place on Saturday, Dec. 18, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Old Town Hall (19 Meetinghouse Road, Sanbornton). More than 30 local artisans will be selling unique handmade items, including jewelry, stained glass, cards, quilted wall hangings, birdhouses, baby blankets and knitted clothing, home decor, soaps, tie-dye shirts, gourmet treats, handbags and totes, candles, ornaments, flower arrangements and more. Search “Sanbornton Community Arts Festival” on Facebook for more information.

It’s the final weekend for Twiggs Gallery’s (254 King St., Boscawen) annual holiday showcase, “Sleighbell Studio,” which closes on Saturday, Dec. 18. The show features a wide selection of fine art, jewelry, cards, books, honeys, soaps and more, all locally made and priced affordably for gift buying. Gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com or call 975-0015.

NYC artist exhibit

The Dana Center for the Humanities at Saint Anselm College (100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester) has a special exhibition featuring the paintings and sculpture of New York City artist Emily Noelle Lambert on view now through Jan. 9. Lambert has shown her work nationally and internationally in solo exhibitions in New York City, Chicago and South Korea as well as a number of group exhibitions. “I love swimming in a kind of visual mystery of things between abstraction, landscape and figuration,” Lambert said of her work in a press release from Saint Anselm. “I search for interactions between materials, colors and forms and often switch things up to keep my curiosity fresh.” The exhibition was curated by Fine Arts Professor Kimberly Kersey-Asbury, with assistance from fine art students on the layout and installation process. Visitors must wear masks inside the gallery. Visit anselm.edu/dana-center-humanities or call 641-7700.

Carols galore: The Piccola Opera presents “The Dickens Carolers on Tour” at the Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord) on Saturday, Dec. 18, at 6 p.m. Tickets cost $15 for seniors and children and $20 for adults. Call 344-4747 or visit ccca-audi.org.

Eve Pierce and her band of singers and musicians will perform festive music in Depot Square in downtown Peterborough on Friday, Dec. 17, starting at 6 p.m., as part of the town’s annual holiday caroling program. Call 547-8323.

The Rockingham Choral Society presents its holiday concert, “Invitations and Carols, on Saturday, Dec. 18, at 7 p.m. at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church (22 Fox Run Road, Newington), and on Sunday, Dec. 19, at 3:30 p.m. at Christ Church (43 Pine St., Exeter). Tickets cost $12. Visit rockinghamchoral.org.

Manchester sports history

The Manchester Historic Association’s Millyard Museum (200 Bedford St., Manchester) celebrates Manchester’s sports history from 1989 through 2009 with a special exhibit, “Queen City Athletic Hall of Fame.” The exhibit features original photos depicting many of the 240 Hall of Fame inductees, as well as trophies, artifacts and memorabilia from the city’s sports community during those two decades. Admission to the museum costs $8 for adults, $5 for seniors age 62 and up and college students, $4 for youth ages 12 through 18 and is free for children under age 12. Current museum hours, according to the website, are Tuesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit manchesterhistoric.org.


ART

Exhibits

HOLIDAY ART SHOW AND SALE Featuring handmade gifts by more than 30 local artists, including paintings, pottery, mixed media, photography, fabric art and more. Two Villages Art Society (46 Main St., Contoocook). Now through Dec. 23. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twovillagesart.org.

CRAFTWORKERS’ GUILD HOLIDAY FAIR Features seasonal decor, photography, fine art and prints, cards, gourmet treats, woodworking, fiber and fabric, stained and fused glass, mixed media, jewelry and more by juried local artists and craftspeople. Now through Dec. 23. In-person shopping at the historic Kendall House (3A Meetinghouse Road, Bedford), open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and an online shop. Visit craftworkersguild.org.

• “SMALL WORKS BIG IMPACT” Creative Ventures Gallery presents its annual holiday exhibit in-person at the gallery (411 Nashua St., Milford) and virtually on the gallery’s website (creativeventuresfineart.com/product-category/small-works-show). The exhibit features non-juried small works of art in a variety of media and styles, created by area professional and nonprofessional artists, priced affordably for holiday gift buying. Now through Dec. 31. Visit creativeventuresfineart.com or call 672-2500.

• “LET IT SNOW” The New Hampshire Art Association presents its holiday exhibition. Robert Lincoln Levy Gallery (136 State St., Portsmouth). Now through Jan. 2. Features works in a variety of media, as well as books and cards for sale. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. Visit nhartassociation.org.

EMILY NOELLE LAMBERT Solo exhibition by New York City artist Emily Noelle Lambert. Dana Center for the Humanities at Saint Anselm College (100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester). On view now through Jan. 9. Masks required inside the gallery. Visit anselm.edu/dana-center-humanities or call 641-7700.

• “THE DYSFUNCTION OF SOCIAL PRACTICE” Kelley Stelling Contemporary presents an exhibition featuring paintings, sculpture and performance works by five New Hampshire artists. Kimball Jenkins Estate (266 N. Main St., Concord). Now through Jan. 14. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with evening and weekend visits available by request. Visit kelleystellingcontemporary.com.

• “SALON 2021” Exhibition features offbeat and experimental works in a variety of media by regional artists with diverse studio practices and artistic approaches. The Kimball Jenkins Estate (266 N. Main St., Concord, 225-3932, kimballjenkins.com). Now through Jan. 14. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with evening and weekend visits available by request.

• “BIG GIFTS IN SMALL PACKAGES” The Seacoast Artist Association’s annual holiday exhibit, featuring a variety of small works of art priced under $100 for gift buying. Now through Jan. 7. 130 Water St., Exeter. Gallery hours are Wednesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, from 1 to 4 p.m. Visit seacoastartist.org or call 778-8856.

• “AS PRECIOUS AS GOLD: CARPETS FROM THE ISLAMIC WORLD” Exhibit features 32 carpets dating from the 15th century to the 19th century. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On view now through Feb. 27, 2022. Museum admission tickets cost $15, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, and must be booked online. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

• “1,000 CRANES FOR NASHUA” Featuring more than 1,000 origami paper cranes created by hundreds of Nashua-area kids, adults and families since April. On display now at The Atrium at St. Joseph Hospital, 172 Kinsley St., Nashua. Visit nashuasculpturesymposium.org.

• “NEW HAMPSHIRE NOW” A collaborative photography project presented by the New Hampshire Historical Society and the New Hampshire Society of Photographic Artists, on display in eight exhibitions at museums and historical societies across the state. Nearly 50 photographers participated in the project, taking more than 5,000 photos of New Hampshire people, places, culture and events from 2018 to 2020 to create a 21st-century portrait of life in the Granite State. Exhibition locations include Belknap Mill Society in Laconia; Colby-Sawyer College in New London; Portsmouth Historical Society; Historical Society of Cheshire County in Keene; the Manchester Historic Association; Museum of the White Mountains at Plymouth State University; and the Tillotson Center in Colebrook; with the flagship exhibition at the New Hampshire Historical Society in Concord. Visit newhampshirenow.org and nhhistory.org.

GALLERY ART A new collection of art by more than 20 area artists on display now in-person and online. Creative Ventures Gallery (411 Nashua St., Milford). Call 672-2500 or visit creativeventuresfineart.com.

• “TOMIE DEPAOLA AT THE CURRIER” Exhibition celebrates the illustrator’s life and legacy through a collection of his original drawings. On view now. Currier Museum of Art, 150 Ash St., Manchester. Museum admission tickets cost $15, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, and must be booked online. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

ART ON MAIN The City of Concord and the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce present a year-round outdoor public art exhibit in Concord’s downtown featuring works by professional sculptors. All sculptures will be for sale. Visit concordnhchamber.com/creativeconcord, call 224-2508 or email tsink@concordnhchamber.com.

• “9/11” Exhibit features images of the September 11 attacks and the aftermath, taken by war photographer Jim Nachtwey. On view now. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). Museum admission tickets cost $15, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, and must be booked online. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

• “ECHOES: ABSTRACT PAINTING TO MODERN QUILTING” Exhibit features abstract paintings inspired by the bold colors, asymmetry, improvisational layout, alternate grid work and negative space in composition of modern quilting. Two Villages Art Society (46 Main St., Contoocook). April 22 through May 14. Visit twovillagesart.org.

• “FOR THE LOVE OF IMPRESSION” Exhibit features prints created using traditional techniques and materials, combined with contemporary aesthetics, new materials, and technology. Two Villages Art Society (46 Main St., Contoocook). Feb. 11 through March 5. Visit twovillagesart.org.

NATURE AT NIGHT: PAINTINGS BY OWEN KRZYZANIAK GEARY” Two Villages Art Society (46 Main St., Contoocook). May 27 through June 18. Visit twovillagesart.org.

Tours

NASHUA PUBLIC ART AUDIO TOUR Self-guided audio tours of the sculptures and murals in downtown Nashua, offered via the Distrx app, which uses Bluetooth iBeacon technology to automatically display photos and text and provides audio descriptions at each stop on the tour as tourists approach the works of art. Each tour has 10 to 15 stops. Free and accessible on Android and iOS on demand. Available in English and Spanish. Visit downtownnashua.org/nashua-art-tour.

Workshops and classes

WINTER ART CLASSES Art classes for teens and adults, including Pottery, Stained Glass, Intermediate Watercolor and Clay Hand Building. Studio 550 Art Center (550 Elm St., Manchester). Five-week sessions. Classes met for two hours a week. Call 232-5597 or visit 550arts.com for the full schedule and cost details.

GENERAL ART CLASSES In-person art classes for all levels and two-dimensional media. held with small groups of two to five students. Private classes are also available. Diane Crespo Fine Art Gallery (32 Hanover St., Manchester). Students are asked to wear masks in the gallery. Tuition costs $20 per group class and $28 per private class, with payment due at the beginning of the class. Call 493-1677 or visit dianecrespofineart.com for availability.

DRAWING & PAINTING CLASSES Art House Studios, 66 Hanover St., Suite 202, Manchester. Classes include Drawing Fundamentals, Painting in Acrylic, Drawing: Observation to Abstraction, Exploring Mixed Media, and Figure Drawing. Class sizes are limited to six students. Visit arthousestudios.org.

THEATER

Shows

•​ PETER PAN The Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) presents. Thurs., Dec. 23, 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $32 to $50. Visit seacoastrep.org.

THE NUTCRACKER The New Hampshire School of Ballet presents. Sun., Dec. 26, at 6 p.m., at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester). Tickets cost $22. Visit nhschoolofballet.com.

TRUE TALES LIVE Monthly showcase of storytellers. Held virtually via Zoom. Last Tuesday of the month, 7 p.m., through December. Visit truetaleslivenh.org.

SCENE CHANGES Produced by New World Theatre. The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Jan. 7 through Jan. 23. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

MARY & ME Produced by Glass Dove Productions. The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Jan. 28 through Feb. 13. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

LAST GAS Produced by the Community Players of Concord. Concord City Auditorium, 2 Prince St., Concord. Feb. 11 through Feb. 13. Tickets cost $18 for adults, $16 for youth ages 17 and under, $16 for seniors age 65 and up. Visit communityplayersofconcord.org.

LIFESPAN OF A FACT Produced by Lend Me a Theater. The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Feb. 18 through March 6. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

MUSICAL MOM Produced by the Community Players of Concord. The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). May 5 through May 15. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $25 for adults, $22 for students, seniors and members and $19 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

THE BALD SOPRANO Produced by the Community Players of Concord. The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). June 17 through June 26. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

Classical

NEW YEAR’S EVE CHAMPAGNE POPS The Portsmouth Symphony Orchestra presents its New Year’s Eve concert. The Music Hall Historic Theater (28 Chestnut St., Portsmouth). Fri., Dec. 31, at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $38. Visit themusichall.org or call 436-2400.

• “WINTER VOYAGES” The New Hampshire Philharmonic Orchestra performs. Seifert Performing Arts Center, 44 Geremonty Drive, Salem. Sat., Feb. 19, 7:30 p.m., and Sun., Feb. 20, 2 p.m. Visit nhphil.org.

DRAWN TO THE MUSIC 2022 – STORIES IN MUSIC The New Hampshire Philharmonic Orchestra performs. Seifert Performing Arts Center, 44 Geremonty Drive, Salem. Sat., April 9, 2 p.m., and Sun., April 10, 2 p.m. Visit nhphil.org.

Happy Hogmanay!

Celebrate the new year Scottish-style

You don’t have to live across the Atlantic to celebrate Hogmanay — Scotland’s New Year’s Eve tradition is coming to Manchester this year, on Sunday, Jan. 2, from 3 to 7 p.m. at the Derryfield Country Club.

“In Scotland this is a very big deal,” said Amy Lehman, program coordinator for NHSCOT, which is putting on the event. “People will travel to Scotland to celebrate Hogmanay.”

This is the second time NHSCOT has held a Hogmanay celebration, the first being in 2019, pre-Covid.

“We had a really good crowd [of hundreds of] people of all ages, and I felt like we had [activities] for everyone,” Lehman said. “We’re very excited that we’re going to gather again this year.”

Kelpies. Courtesy photo.

She said NHSCOT has been working to expand its events so there are more of them year-round, to complement the popular New Hampshire Highland Games and Festival that typically takes place at the end of the summer. People who have enjoyed the Highland Games will find some of the same fun traditions at Hogmanay — though it will likely be significantly colder. Most events are held outside, with plenty of warming fires and a s’mores station to keep things cozy.

“Fire is the center of Hogmanay celebrations,” Lehman said, noting that in Scotland they’ll have fire festivals to drive away bad spirits.

Street curling, which was at the Highland Games for the first time this year, will be available for people to try, and other “try-its” include drumming, Highland dancing and Scottish country dancing.

“Scottish country dancing you do with a group of people … at a wedding or at parties,” Lehman said. “We’ll have a caller for that. Highland dance is usually done with someone who’s more highly trained.”

A “haggis throw” (cornhole) will be set up near the fires, and sledding will be available as long as there’s enough snow on the ground. Rebel Collective and the Pipes and Drums of NHSCOT will take turns playing live music in a heated tent throughout the event.

Indoors, there will be Scottish board games and a jigsaw puzzle challenge.

Stramash, a Scottish board game. Courtesy photo.

Tickets include a buffet for adults, with fish and chips, lamb stew and shepherd’s pie. Kids get chicken strips and french fries, though Lehman said a lot of the kids are interested in trying some of the “adult” foods. There will be a cash bar as well.

The day will conclude with a torchlit parade.

“We’ll all gather outside and everyone will be led [in a short parade] by pipes and drums, so it’s very festive,” Lehman said. “We have some banners kids can hold, and we end up around the fire and sing ‘Auld Lang Syne’ at 7 p.m., which is midnight in Scotland.”

As the event winds down, NHSCOT will have a “First Footing,” which says the first visitor to enter a home in the new year bearing gifts will bring good luck — particularly if that visitor is tall, dark and good-looking.

Visitors will be given small gifts on their way out to honor that Scottish tradition.

Lehman said that last year they had a good mix of people who attended, including plenty with no Scottish background and having never attended the Highland Games.

“It’s a family-friendly event that makes everybody happy,” she said.

Schedule of events

Indoor

  • Scottish jigsaw puzzles – ongoing
  • 4 p.m. Team Puzzle Challenge
  • 4 p.m. Stramash – Scottish Board Games
  • 4 p.m. Snare Drumming Try It – Pipes & Drums of NHSCOT
  • 5 p.m. Royalty Announcement: Lord, Lady, Lassie & Lad
  • 5:30 p.m. Tenor Drumming Try It – Pipes & Drums of NHSCOT

Outdoor

  • Sledding, ongoing as snow conditions allow
  • 4 to 6 p.m. Dinner (ticket required)
  • 4 p.m. Highland Dance Try It – Shelley Stiles
  • 4:30 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing – Merrill Henderson
  • 5 p.m. Highland Dance Try It – Shelley Stiles
  • 5:30 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing – Merrill Henderson
  • 6:30 p.m. Parade
  • 7 p.m. Toast to Hogmanay & singing of “Auld Lang Syne”
  • First Footing

Hogmanay

When: Sunday, Jan. 2, from 3 to 7 p.m.
Where: Derryfield Country Club, 625 Mammoth Road, Manchester
Cost: Adults, $42, which includes buffet-style meal; children, $20, which includes chicken and french fries
Contact: info@nhscot.org, 219-1772

Featured Photo: Hogmanay Bonfire. Courtesy photo.

The Art Roundup 21/12/16

The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

A Christmas classic: There are still plenty of opportunities to see Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol on stage before Christmas.

The Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) presents its production of A Christmas Carolon Thursday, Dec. 16, Friday, Dec. 17, at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 21, and Wednesday, Dec. 22, at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Dec. 18, at 2 and 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday, Dec. 19, at noon. Tickets range from $25 to $46. Visit palacetheatre.org or call 668-5588.

The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord) presents A Christmas Carolon Friday, Dec. 17, and Saturday, Dec. 18, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 19, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

The Peacock Players present A Christmas Carol: An Original Live Radio Playat the Court Street Theatre (14 Court St., Nashua) on Thursday, Dec. 16, and Friday, Dec. 17, at 7 p.m.; Saturday, Dec. 18, at 2 and 7 p.m.; and Sunday, Dec. 19, at 2 p.m. Tickets range from $15 to $19. Visit peacockplayers.org.

The Players’ Ring Theatre (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth) presents A Christmas Carol on Friday, Dec. 17, Monday, Dec. 20, and Thursday, Dec. 23, at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Dec. 18, at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday, Dec. 18, at 2:30 p.m. Tickets cost $25 for adults, $22 for students and seniors age 65 and up and $15 for kids under age 12. Visit playersring.org or call 436-8123.

Finally, the Rochester Opera House (31 Wakefield St., Rochester) presents A Christmas Carol on Thursday, Dec. 16, and Friday, Dec. 17, at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 18, at 2 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 19, at 5 p.m. Tickets range from $16 to $26. Visit rochesteroperahouse.com.

Nutcracker weekend

There’s still time to see a local production of The Nutcracker. The New England School of Dance will perform the piece on Saturday, Dec. 18, with showtimes at 2 and 5:30 p.m., at the Stockbridge Theatre (Pinkerton Academy, 5 Pinkerton St., Derry). Tickets cost $30. Visit newenglandschoolofdance.com.

Ballet Misha presents The Nutcracker on Saturday, Dec. 18, at 1 and 6 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 19, at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., at the Dana Center (Saint Anselm College, 100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester). Tickets cost $26. Visit dimensionsindance.com.

Finally, the New Hampshire School of Ballet will perform The Nutcracker Suite at Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord) on Sunday, Dec. 19, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22. Visit nhschoolofballet.com.

Handmade gifts: The Sanbornton Community Arts Festival will take place on Saturday, Dec. 18, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Old Town Hall (19 Meetinghouse Road, Sanbornton). More than 30 local artisans will be selling unique handmade items, including jewelry, stained glass, cards, quilted wall hangings, birdhouses, baby blankets and knitted clothing, home decor, soaps, tie-dye shirts, gourmet treats, handbags and totes, candles, ornaments, flower arrangements and more. Search “Sanbornton Community Arts Festival” on Facebook for more information.

It’s the final weekend for Twiggs Gallery’s (254 King St., Boscawen) annual holiday showcase, “Sleighbell Studio,” which closes on Saturday, Dec. 18. The show features a wide selection of fine art, jewelry, cards, books, honeys, soaps and more, all locally made and priced affordably for gift buying. Gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com or call 975-0015.

Last-minute gifts

If you’re getting to your holiday shopping a little late this year, these art and craft sales are open until Thursday, Dec. 23.

Two Villages Art Society’s (46 Main St., Contoocook) Holiday Art Show and Sale features handmade gifts by more than 30 local artists, including paintings, pottery, mixed media, photography, fabric art and more. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twovillagesart.org. The Craftworkers’ Guild’s Holiday Fair has in-person shopping at the historic Kendall House (3A Meetinghouse Road, Bedford), open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and an online shop, featuring seasonal decor, photography, fine art and prints, cards, gourmet treats, woodworking, fiber and fabric, stained and fused glass, mixed media, jewelry and more by juried local artists and craftspeople. Visit craftworkersguild.org.

Carols galore: The Piccola Opera presents “The Dickens Carolers on Tour” at the Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord) on Saturday, Dec. 18, at 6 p.m. Tickets cost $15 for seniors and children and $20 for adults. Call 344-4747 or visit ccca-audi.org.

Eve Pierce and her band of singers and musicians will perform festive music in Depot Square in downtown Peterborough on Friday, Dec. 17, starting at 6 p.m., as part of the town’s annual holiday caroling program. Call 547-8323.

The Rockingham Choral Society presents its holiday concert, “Invitations and Carols, on Saturday, Dec. 18, at 7 p.m. at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church (22 Fox Run Road, Newington), and on Sunday, Dec. 19, at 3:30 p.m. at Christ Church (43 Pine St., Exeter). Tickets cost $12. Visit rockinghamchoral.org.

Holiday pops

The New Hampshire Philharmonic performs a combination of classical and popular seasonal favorites for its Holiday Pops concert at the Seifert Performing Arts Center (44 Geremonty Drive, Salem), with showtimes on Saturday, Dec. 18, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 19, at 2 p.m. The concert will also feature music by Florence Price, the first African American female composer to have her music performed by a major symphony orchestra in 1933, including her piece “Dances in Canebreaks,” which is based on dance themes Price knew in her lifetime. Tickets cost $30 for adults, $25 for seniors and $8 for students. Visit nhphil.org or call 647-6476.


ART

Exhibits

• “AROUND NEW HAMPSHIRE” On exhibit at the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce’s Visitor Center, 49 S. Main St., Concord, on view now through Dec. 16. Featuring the work of New Hampshire Art Association member Elaine Farmer, the exhibit features her oil paintings embodying New Hampshire’s iconic views and ideals, ranging from mountain lakes and birch tree woods to historic landmarks. Visit concordnhchamber.com or nhartassociation.org.

HOLIDAY ART SHOW AND SALE Featuring handmade gifts by more than 30 local artists, including paintings, pottery, mixed media, photography, fabric art and more. Two Villages Art Society (46 Main St., Contoocook). Now through Dec. 23. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twovillagesart.org.

CRAFTWORKERS’ GUILD HOLIDAY FAIR Features seasonal decor, photography, fine art and prints, cards, gourmet treats, woodworking, fiber and fabric, stained and fused glass, mixed media, jewelry and more by juried local artists and craftspeople. Now through Dec. 23. In-person shopping at the historic Kendall House (3A Meetinghouse Road, Bedford), open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and an online shop. Visit craftworkersguild.org.

• “SMALL WORKS BIG IMPACT” Creative Ventures Gallery presents its annual holiday exhibit in-person at the gallery (411 Nashua St., Milford) and virtually on the gallery’s website (creativeventuresfineart.com/product-category/small-works-show). The exhibit features non-juried small works of art in a variety of media and styles, created by area professional and nonprofessional artists, priced affordably for holiday gift buying. Now through Dec. 31. Visit creativeventuresfineart.com or call 672-2500.

• “LET IT SNOW” The New Hampshire Art Association presents its holiday exhibition. Robert Lincoln Levy Gallery (136 State St., Portsmouth). Now through Jan. 2. Features works in a variety of media, as well as books and cards for sale. Opening reception on Fri., Dec. 3, from 5 to 8 p.m. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. Visit nhartassociation.org.

EMILY NOELLE LAMBERT Solo exhibition by New York City artist Emily Noelle Lambert. Dana Center for the Humanities at Saint Anselm College (100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester). On view now through Jan. 9. Masks required inside the gallery. Visit anselm.edu/dana-center-humanities or call 641-7700.

• “THE DYSFUNCTION OF SOCIAL PRACTICE” Kelley Stelling Contemporary presents an exhibition featuring paintings, sculpture and performance works by five New Hampshire artists. Kimball Jenkins Estate (266 N. Main St., Concord). Now through Jan. 14. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with evening and weekend visits available by request. Visit kelleystellingcontemporary.com.

• “SALON 2021” Exhibition features offbeat and experimental works in a variety of media by regional artists with diverse studio practices and artistic approaches. The Kimball Jenkins Estate (266 N. Main St., Concord, 225-3932, kimballjenkins.com). Now through Jan. 14. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with evening and weekend visits available by request.

• “BIG GIFTS IN SMALL PACKAGES” The Seacoast Artist Association’s annual holiday exhibit, featuring a variety of small works of art priced under $100 for gift buying. Now through Jan. 7. 130 Water St., Exeter. Gallery hours are Wednesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, from 1 to 4 p.m. Visit seacoastartist.org or call 778-8856.

• “AS PRECIOUS AS GOLD: CARPETS FROM THE ISLAMIC WORLD” Exhibit features 32 carpets dating from the 15th century to the 19th century. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On view now through Feb. 27, 2022. Museum admission tickets cost $15, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, and must be booked online. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

• “1,000 CRANES FOR NASHUA” Featuring more than 1,000 origami paper cranes created by hundreds of Nashua-area kids, adults and families since April. On display now at The Atrium at St. Joseph Hospital, 172 Kinsley St., Nashua. Visit nashuasculpturesymposium.org.

• “NEW HAMPSHIRE NOW” A collaborative photography project presented by the New Hampshire Historical Society and the New Hampshire Society of Photographic Artists, on display in eight exhibitions at museums and historical societies across the state. Nearly 50 photographers participated in the project, taking more than 5,000 photos of New Hampshire people, places, culture and events from 2018 to 2020 to create a 21st-century portrait of life in the Granite State. Exhibition locations include Belknap Mill Society in Laconia; Colby-Sawyer College in New London; Portsmouth Historical Society; Historical Society of Cheshire County in Keene; the Manchester Historic Association; Museum of the White Mountains at Plymouth State University; and the Tillotson Center in Colebrook; with the flagship exhibition at the New Hampshire Historical Society in Concord. Visit newhampshirenow.org.

GALLERY ART A new collection of art by more than 20 area artists on display now in-person and online. Creative Ventures Gallery (411 Nashua St., Milford). Call 672-2500 or visit creativeventuresfineart.com.

• “TOMIE DEPAOLA AT THE CURRIER” Exhibition celebrates the illustrator’s life and legacy through a collection of his original drawings. On view now. Currier Museum of Art, 150 Ash St., Manchester. Museum admission tickets cost $15, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, and must be booked online. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

ART ON MAIN The City of Concord and the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce present a year-round outdoor public art exhibit in Concord’s downtown featuring works by professional sculptors. All sculptures will be for sale. Visit concordnhchamber.com/creativeconcord, call 224-2508 or email tsink@concordnhchamber.com.

• “9/11” Exhibit features images of the September 11 attacks and the aftermath, taken by war photographer Jim Nachtwey. On view now. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). Museum admission tickets cost $15, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, and must be booked online. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

Workshops and classes

WINTER ART CLASSES Art classes for teens and adults, including Pottery, Stained Glass, Intermediate Watercolor and Clay Hand Building. Studio 550 Art Center (550 Elm St., Manchester). Five-week sessions. Classes met for two hours a week. Call 232-5597 or visit 550arts.com for the full schedule and cost details.

GENERAL ART CLASSES In-person art classes for all levels and two-dimensional media. held with small groups of two to five students. Private classes are also available. Diane Crespo Fine Art Gallery (32 Hanover St., Manchester). Students are asked to wear masks in the gallery. Tuition costs $20 per group class and $28 per private class, with payment due at the beginning of the class. Call 493-1677 or visit dianecrespofineart.com for availability.

THEATER

Shows

•​ RUDOLPH THE RED NOSED REINDEER The Palace Youth Theatre presents. Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester). Wed., Dec. 15, at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $12 to $15. Visit palacetheatre.org or call 668-5588.

THE TOYMAKER’S APPRENTICE The Players’ Ring Theatre presents. 105 Marcy St., Portsmouth. Now through Dec. 19, with showtimes on Saturday and Sunday at 10 a.m. and noon. Tickets cost $25 for adults, $22 for students and seniors age 65 and up and $15 for kids under age 12. Visit playersring.org or call 436-8123.

•​ PETER PAN The Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) presents. Now through Dec. 23, with showtimes on Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m., and Sunday at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $32 to $50. Visit seacoastrep.org.

THE NUTCRACKER The New Hampshire School of Ballet presents. Sun., Dec. 19, at 2 p.m., at Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord); and Sun., Dec. 26, at 6 p.m., at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester). Tickets cost $22. Visit nhschoolofballet.com.

TRUE TALES LIVE Monthly showcase of storytellers. Held virtually via Zoom. Last Tuesday of the month, 7 p.m., Now through December. Visit truetaleslivenh.org.

SCENE CHANGES Produced by New World Theatre. The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Jan. 7 through Jan. 23. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

MARY & ME Produced by Glass Dove Productions. The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Jan. 28 through Feb. 13. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

LAST GAS Produced by the Community Players of Concord. Concord City Auditorium, 2 Prince St., Concord. Feb. 11 through Feb. 13. Tickets cost $18 for adults, $16 for youth ages 17 and under, $16 for seniors age 65 and up. Visit communityplayersofconcord.org.

LIFESPAN OF A FACT Produced by Lend Me a Theater. The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Feb. 18 through March 6. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

MUSICAL MOM Produced by the Community Players of Concord. The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). May 5 through May 15. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $25 for adults, $22 for students, seniors and members and $19 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

THE BALD SOPRANO Produced by the Community Players of Concord. The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). June 17 through June 26. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

Classical

HOLIDAY POPS The New Hampshire Philharmonic performs holiday music. Sat., Dec. 18, 7:30 p.m., and Sun., Dec. 19, 2 p.m. Seifert Performing Arts Center, 44 Geremonty Drive, Salem. Tickets cost $30 for adults, $25 for seniors and $8 for students. Visit nhphil.org.

• “INVITATIONS AND CAROLS” The Rockingham Choral Society presents its holiday concert. Sat., Dec. 18, at 7 p.m., at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church (22 Fox Run Road, Newington); and Sun., Dec. 19, at 3:30 p.m., at Christ Church (43 Pine St., Exeter). Tickets cost $12. Visit rockinghamchoral.org.

Merry movement and music

Birdie premieres at Canterbury Shaker Village’s holiday event

The heartwarming story of a child who grew up in Canterbury Shaker Village is part of the inspiration behind Birdie, a new show that will be performed for the first time this weekend as part of the village’s Merry, Merry Canterbury celebration.

Birdie

“It’s a beautiful story,” said Shaker Village artist in residence Lorraine Chapman, who created the production as a way to honor both the Village’s theatrical history and the story of Alberta MacMillan Kirkpatrick, who came to Shaker Village at the age of 11. “Her mother died and she went from foster home to foster home. … [She] was not treated well and had quite a few … terrible experiences. When she got to the village, Sister Marguerite … gave this girl her first hug in four years.”

Chapman, a professional dancer and choreographer who owns a small studio in the Boston area, has been bringing dance to the Village for several years now, partly at the request of Joan Talarico-Brodsky, the founder of New Hampshire Dance Collaborative and former Shaker Village board member.

“Her desire was to bring more dance to the Village because the Shakers, part of their daily spiritual routine was movement and dance,” Chapman said. “There’s some written descriptions of … [when] they would go into the meetinghouse and throw themselves around the room and roll on the floor and gesticulate. … They were releasing negative thoughts, negative energy.”

For this piece, Chapman sat in the archives for weeks researching what the Shakers called “entertainments.”

“They consisted of Bible scenes, quartets, singing, instruments, … plays, skits,” Chapman said.

She read dozens of old programs to try to decipher what it was the Shakers were doing in their performances.

“Entertainments were rehearsed meticulously,” Chapman said. “This is [like] the work of a [modern-day] theater company.”

One of the entertainments she found was “Old Oaken Bucket,” a popular song at the time that she incorporated into Birdie, along with a play called “Cate Family Reunion” that she found handwritten in a journal.

“We had enough to go on with the entertainments, but I also wanted to bring in Alberta’s story,” Chapman said. “We’re kind of weaving together her story with what we think they might have … have presented in their entertainments.”

Chapman wanted to capture the kindness that Alberta was shown when she was taken in by the Shakers. She lived there until her late teens, and though she decided not to become a Shaker, she loved her time there — it’s evident in the letters Alberta wrote to her father while she was there, Chapman said. Chapman also had a chance to meet Alberta’s daughter, Marcy O’Brien, at a Starbucks over Thanksgiving weekend.

“I just got a sense of what a relief it was to her mother, the difference between what her life had been in the foster homes and [the life] she was able to live at the village,” Chapman said. “I think what the Shakers wanted to do when they built Canterbury Shaker Village, I think they wanted to build a heaven on earth, and I think they did that.”

Merry, Merry Canterbury

This is the second and final weekend of Merry, Merry Canterbury, which, along with the performance of Birdie, features crafts and a Stairway to the Clouds.

“We had a bunch of elves working at the Village and we set up a really magical experience in the horse barn,” Executive Director Leslie Nolan said. “Visitors will meander through little makeshift forests and go upstairs to a cloud-like atmosphere … and experience the [proverbial] silver lining in the cloud.”

She said there will be a cotton candy machine to go with the cloud theme. In the gallery next door, there will be crafts that are appropriate for all ages.

“Both of these are ecological ornaments,” Nolan said. “There’s not a lot of glitter and glue.”

One is a cinnamon ornament, and the other is a pomander ball, where cloves are inserted into clementines and oranges in a pattern and they are wrapped with a ribbon for hanging.

“I’m told it was used in the 19th century [to eliminate odors],” Nolan said. “People would hang them up so they were both decorative and functional.”

After the performance of Birdie, candlelight tours will be offered for an additional fee.

“Those are going to be really special,” Nolan said. “We’ll be walking through two buildings … and everyone will have a small lantern to hold.”

The tours will be capped off with Rae Easter singing “Simple Gifts” a cappella.

“She has a beautiful voice,” Nolan said.

The Shaker Village store will be open throughout the event selling holiday gifts and homemade candies, with free gift wrapping available.

Merry, Merry Canterbury

Where: Canterbury Shaker Village, 288 Shaker Road, Canterbury
When: Saturday, Dec. 18, and Sunday, Dec. 19, 1 to 5 p.m.
Stairway to the Clouds and crafts: 1 to 5 p.m. each day
Birdie dance and theatrical performance: 3 p.m. each day
Candlelight tours: 4 and 5 p.m. each day
Cost: $20 for adults; kids get in free. All events included in the admission price except for candlelight tours, which are an additional $50.
More info: shakers.org
Masks are required.

Featured Photo: Performers rehearse Birdie. Courtesy photos.

The Art Roundup 21/12/09

The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

Nutcracker galore: Don’t miss your chance to see the classic Nutcracker this holiday season. Three local dance groups are performing the piece this weekend. The Turning Pointe Center of Dance presents The Nutcracker on Saturday, Dec. 11, at 2 p.m. at the Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord). Tickets cost $18. Visit turningpointecenterofdance.com.

The Northeastern Ballet Theatre presents The Nutcracker on Saturday, Dec. 11, at 7 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 12, at 2 p.m., at Dover High School (25 Alumni Drive, Dover). There will also be shows the following weekend on Saturday, Dec. 18, at 7 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 19, at 2 p.m., at the Kingswood Arts Center (396 S. Main St., Wolfeboro). Tickets purchased in advance cost $30 for adults, $25 for seniors age 60 and up and $17.50 for students and children; tickets purchased at the door are an additional $5. Visit northeasternballet.org.

Finally, Dance Visions Network presents The Nutcracker Suite on Sunday, Dec. 12, with shows at 12:30 and 5:30 p.m. at the Dana Center (Saint Anselm College, 100 Saint Anselm Dr., Manchester). Tickets cost $22. Visit dancevisionsnetwork.com.

Holiday theater: If you’re looking for something different from the ubiquitous Nutcracker and Christmas Carol, there are a few other holiday shows coming up. The Majestic Theatre presents Scrooge in Love at the Derry Opera House (29 W. Broadway, Derry), with showtimes on Friday, Dec. 10, at 7 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 11, at 2 and 7 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 12, at 2 p.m. Set one year after the events of Charles’ Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, the musical follows four ghosts — Jacob Marley and the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future — as they team up to reunite a reformed Ebenezer Scrooge with his long-long first love, Belle. Tickets cost $20 for adults and $15 for seniors age 65 and up and students age 17 and under. Visit majestictheatre.net.

The Pinkerton Players presents Donald Margulies’ play Coney Island Christmas at the Stockbridge Theatre (5 Pinkerton St., Derry), with showtimes on Friday, Dec. 10, and Saturday, Dec. 11, at 7 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 12, at 2 p.m. Based on the 1959 autobiographical short story “The Loudest Voice” by Grace Paley, Coney Island Christmas follows a young Jewish girl from an immigrant family in Depression-era New York City who is cast as Jesus in her school’s Christmas pageant. Tickets cost $15 for adults and $10 for students and seniors. Visit stockbridgetheatre.com.

The Palace Youth Theatre, consisting of student actors in grades 2 through 12, presents Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) on Tuesday, Dec. 14, and Wednesday, Dec. 15, at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $12 to $15. Visit palacetheatre.org or call 668-5588.

Festive voices: It’s also a big weekend for holiday choral music. The Souhegan Valley Chorus presents its holiday concert, “A Celebration of Christmas,” on Saturday, Dec. 11, at 7 p.m. at Souhegan High School (412 Boston Post Road, Amherst). Tickets are available at the door and cost $15 for adults and $12 for students and seniors. Visit souheganvalleychorus.org.

The Concord Chorale presents its holiday show “Gloria!”at South Congregational Church (27 Pleasant St., Concord) on Saturday, Dec. 11, at 7 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 12, at 3 p.m. Tickets cost $20 for general admission and $15 for seniors in advance, and $25/$20 at the door. Visit concordchorale.org.

Lastly, the Manchester Choral Society presents its holiday concert at LaBelle Winery (345 Route 101, Amherst) on Sunday, Dec. 12, at 3 p.m. Tickets cost $20 for adults and $10 for kids age 10 and under. Visit labellewinery.com

DIY gifts

AR Workshop Manchester (875 Elm St., Manchester) will have a holiday gift making workshop on Saturday, Dec. 18, from 2 to 5 p.m. There will be several different projects to choose from, including mini plank trays, round lazy susans, centerpiece boxes and photo boards. The cost ranges from $49.50 to $89.50, depending on the project chosen. Registration is required, and space is limited. Call 573-9662 or visit arworkshop.com/manchester.


ART

Exhibits

• “AROUND NEW HAMPSHIRE” Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce, 49 S. Main St., Concord, now through Dec. 16. Featuring the work of New Hampshire Art Association member Elaine Farmer, including oil paintings embodying New Hampshire’s iconic views and ideals, ranging from mountain lakes and birch tree woods to historic landmarks. Visit nhartassociation.org.

EMILY NOELLE LAMBERT Solo exhibition by New York City artist Emily Noelle Lambert. Dana Center for the Humanities (Saint Anselm College, 100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester). Now through Jan. 9. Masks required inside the gallery. Visit anselm.edu/dana-center-humanities or call 641-7700.

• “THE DYSFUNCTION OF SOCIAL PRACTICE” Kelley Stelling Contemporary presents an exhibition featuring paintings, sculpture and performance works by five New Hampshire artists. Kimball Jenkins Estate (266 N. Main St., Concord). Now through Jan. 14. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with evening and weekend visits available by request. Visit kelleystellingcontemporary.com.

THEATER

Shows

A CHRISTMAS CAROL Hatbox Theatre (270 Loudon Road, Concord). Now through Dec. 19. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

THE TOYMAKER’S APPRENTICE The Players’ Ring Theatre presents. 105 Marcy St., Portsmouth. Now through Dec. 19, with showtimes on Saturday and Sunday at 10 a.m. and noon. Tickets cost $25 for adults, $22 for students and seniors age 65 and up and $15 for kids under age 12. Visit playersring.org or call 436-8123.

•​ PETER PAN The Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) presents. Now through Dec. 23, with showtimes on Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m., and Sunday at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $32 to $50. Visit seacoastrep.org.

A CHRISTMAS CAROL: AN ORIGINAL LIVE RADIO PLAY The Peacock Players present. Court Street Theatre (14 Court St., Nashua). Thurs., Dec. 16, and Fri., Dec. 17, at 7 p.m.; Sat., Dec. 18, at 2 and 7 p.m.; and Sun., Dec. 19, at 2 p.m. Tickets range from $15 to $19. Visit peacockplayers.org.

THE NUTCRACKER The NH School of Ballet presents. Sun., Dec. 19, at 2 p.m., at Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord); and Sun., Dec. 26, at 6 p.m., at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester). Tickets cost $22. Visit nhschoolofballet.com.

Classical

• “IT’S THE MOST WONDERFUL TIME OF THE YEAR” The NH Gay Men’s Chorus presents holiday concert. Sat., Dec. 11, 7:30 p.m., at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church (22 Fox Run Road, Newington); and Sun., Dec. 12, 4 p.m., at Derryfield School (2108 River Road, Manchester). Tickets cost $20 for adults; free for children under age 13. Visit nhgmc.com.

GRANITE STATE RINGERS Handbell choir performs holiday music. Sat., Dec. 11, 2 p.m. 20 Main St., Sandown. Free. Reservations required. Visit granitestateringers.org.

HOLIDAY SPECTACULAR Lakes Region Symphony Orchestra performs. Fri., Dec. 10, 7 p.m., at Colonial Theatre (617 Main St., Laconia); and Sat., Dec. 11, 7 p.m., and Sun., Dec. 12, 3 p.m., at Inter-Lakes Community Auditorium (Route 25, Meredith). Tickets cost $10 to $20 for students and $20 to $30 for adults for Dec. 10 show, and $10 for students and $25 for adults for shows on Dec. 11 and Dec. 12. Visit lrso.org.

HOLIDAY POPS Symphony NH performs. Sat., Dec. 11, at 7:30 p.m., at the Keefe Center for the Arts (117 Elm St., Nashua); and Sun., Dec. 12, at 3 p.m., at Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord). Tickets range from $20 to $60 for adults, $18 to $55 for seniors age 65+, and are free for children. Visit symphonynh.org.

• “THE DICKENS CAROLERS ON TOUR The Piccola Opera presents. Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord). Sat., Dec. 18, at 6 p.m. Tickets cost $15 for seniors and children and $20 for adults. Call 344-4747 or visit ccca-audi.org.

Gift Guide – Creatively wrapped

Art, music and theater gifts for all ages

There are plenty of opportunities to shop locally for handmade, one-of-a-kind gifts this month. Some art galleries host special holiday exhibits focused on small and affordable works of art, with gift shopping in mind. Pop-up holiday arts markets and craft fairs have a little of everything, including photography, pottery, woodwork, textiles, jewelry, glass, metal, fine art, mixed media and more. New Hampshire also has a number of retail shops that sell items created by local artists and craftspeople.

“Buying handmade and local not only supports the local economy, and our neighbors’ livelihoods, but also presents an opportunity to gift unique, one-of-a-kind, heartfelt gifts that are so much more personal than things you may find in a bigger retail environment,” said Jessica Moores, owner of Manchester Craft Market.

Arts markets and craft fairs

• The annual holiday showcase at Twiggs Gallery (254 King St., Boscawen), “Sleighbell Studio, is open now through Dec. 18, featuring a wide selection of fine art, jewelry, cards, books, honeys, soaps and more, all locally made and priced affordably for gift buying. Gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com or call 975-0015.

• “Small Works —Big Impact, the annual holiday exhibit at Creative Ventures Gallery (411 Nashua St., Milford), is going on now through Dec. 31, in person at the gallery and virtually on the gallery’s website (creativeventuresfineart.com/product-category/small-works-show). The exhibit features non-juried small works of art in a variety of media and styles, created by area professional and nonprofessional artists, priced affordably for holiday gift buying. Visit creativeventuresfineart.com or call 672-2500.

• Two Villages Art Society (46 Main St., Contoocook) has its Holiday Art Show and Sale now through Dec. 23, featuring handmade gifts by more than 30 local artists, including paintings, pottery, mixed media, photography, fabric art and more. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twovillagesart.org.

The Craftworkers’ Guild’s Holiday Fair is open now through Dec. 23, with in-person shopping at the historic Kendall House (3A Meetinghouse Road, Bedford), open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and an online shop. The fair will feature seasonal decor, photography, fine art and prints, cards, gourmet treats, woodworking, fiber and fabric, stained and fused glass, mixed media, jewelry and more by juried local artists and craftspeople. Visit craftworkersguild.org.

• The Great Holiday Shopping Extravaganza is Friday, Dec. 10, from 5 to 9 p.m., and Saturday, Dec. 11, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Hampshire Hills Athletic Club (50 Emerson Road, Milford). More than 80 local crafters and artisans will sell jewelry, scarves, home decor, woodwork, pottery, metal art and more. Visit hampshirehills.com.

• The Holly Jolly Craft Fair takes place at DoubleTree Hotel (2 Somerset Parkway, Nashua) on Saturday, Dec. 11, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. More than 80 exhibitors will sell jewelry, wreaths, metal art, pottery, children’s items, candles, scarves and more. Admission costs $3 for adults, $2 for seniors and is free for kids under age 16. Visit joycescraftshows.com.

• The New Hampshire Audubon hosts its Holiday Fair on Saturday, Dec. 11, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the McLane Center (84 Silk Farm Road, Concord). A number of local artists will show and sell their work, including jewelry, pottery, nature photography, greeting cards, quilted items and more. Visit nhaudubon.org.

• The Artisan Market at The Cider Mill Gallery (24 Francestown Road, New Boston) is going on now through Dec. 24, open Friday through Sunday, and, for last-minute gift shopping, Monday, Dec. 20, through Thursday, Dec. 23, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., each day. Call 487-5522 or visit eileenbelanger.com.

Handmade gift shops

Creative Vibes (2 Pauls Way, Amherst, 557-2457, creativevibesnh.com, open Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.)

Currier Museum of Art gift shop (150 Ash St., Manchester, 669-6144, currier.org, open Thursday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.)

The League of New Hampshire Craftsmen Fine Craft Galleries (nhcrafts.org)

Concord (36 N. Main St., 228-8171, open Monday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.)

Hooksett (530 W. River Road, 210-5181, open daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.)

Nashua (98 Main St., 595-8233, open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Monday through Wednesday and Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m on Thursday and Friday, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday)

Meredith (279 Daniel Webster Hwy., 279-7920, open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.)

Locally Made

Salem (99 Rockingham Blvd., Salem, 890-7141, locallyhandmadesalemnh.com, open Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 6 p.m.)

Merrimack (80 Premium Outlets Blvd., Merrimack, 377-7610, facebook.com/LHMerrimackNH, open Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.)

Manchester Craft Market (Mall of New Hampshire, 1500 S. Willow St., Manchester, manchestercraftmarket.com, open Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 6 p.m.)

Spriggs Shoppe (Twiggs Gallery, 254 King St., Boscawen, 975-0015, twiggsgallery.wordpress.com, open Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m.)

Studio 550 Art Center (550 Elm St., Manchester, 232-5597, 550arts.com, open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday from noon to 8 p.m. Closed Wednesday and Sunday.)

Wild Little Art Shop (Wild Salamander Creative Arts Center, 30 Ash St., Hollis, 465-9453, wildsalamander.com, open Wednesday from noon to 4 p.m., Thursday from 1 to 7 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; closing at 5 p.m. on Dec. 23.)

Performance venues

For the theater-lover in your life, consider tickets to an upcoming show that you know they would like.

“Giving the gift of theater and allowing someone to have a night out and away from the daily grind of life is a great thing,” said Robert Dionne, artistic director for The Majestic Theatre, a theater company based in Manchester.

Or let the recipient choose a show themselves with a gift certificate for a local entertainment venue.

“Entertainment is a great gift because it’s providing an experience that is always unique, and it’s a flexible option that can satisfy the tastes of any recipient,” said Dan Darling, executive director of the Franklin Opera House.

Capitol Center for the Arts (44 S. Main St., and Bank of New Hampshire Stage, 16 S. Main St., Concord, 225-1111, ccanh.com)

Franklin Opera House (316 Central St., Franklin, 934-1901, franklinoperahouse.org)

Hatbox Theatre (270 Loudon Road, Concord, 715-2315, hatboxnh.com)

Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester, 668-5588, palacetheatre.org)

The Music Hall (Historic Theater, 28 Chestnut St., and Loft, 131 Congress St., Portsmouth, 436-2400, themusichall.org)

Art classes/workshops

Give the gift of knowledge to an aspiring artist, actor or musician with a gift certificate for a local art studio, theater program or music school, which they can use for workshops or classes to improve their craft.

“Perhaps someone played an instrument many years ago and has been wanting to pick it up again,” said Dionne, who is also the administrator at Ted Herbert Music School in Manchester. “Our teachers [work with] all ages, abilities, and musical styles. Whether you are learning for fun or to further a music career, we are here to lead you in the direction you wish.”

AR Workshop Manchester (875 Elm St., Manchester, 573-9662, arworkshop.com/manchester) Offers DIY workshops for creating custom wood signs, canvas pillows, centerpiece boxes, canvas tote bags and more.

Currier Museum of Art, Art Center (180 Pearl St., Manchester, 669-6144, currier.org) Offers seasonal weekly classes, master classes and one-day workshops for kids and adults in all kinds of media.

Kimball-Jenkins School of Art (266 N. Main St., Concord, 225-3932, kimballjenkins.com) Offers weekly classes, master classes and one-day workshops for kids and adults in all kinds of media.

The League of New Hampshire Craftsmen Fine Craft Galleries (98 Main St., Nashua, 595-8233; 279 Daniel Webster Hwy., Meredith, 279-7920, nhcrafts.org) Offer weekly classes and one-day workshops for a variety of crafts.

Muse Paintbar (42 Hanover St., Manchester, muse paintbar.com) Offers paint-and-sip workshops and step-by-step painting workshops for families.

Studio 550 Art Center (550 Elm St., Manchester, 232-5597, 550arts.com) Offers classes and workshops for all ages and experience levels in pottery, clay, painting, stained glass and more.

Time to Clay (228 Daniel Webster Hwy., Nashua, timetoclay.com) Offers pottery workshops for all ages.

The Voice of Clay (16 Meetinghouse Hill Road, Brookline, 672-2626, voiceofclay.com) Offers pottery classes for all ages and experience levels.

You’re Fired (25 S. River Road, Bedford, 641-3473; 133 Loudon Road, No. 101, Concord, 226-3473; 264 N. Broadway, Salem, 894-5456; 204-5559; yourefirednh.com) Offers open studio times and materials for pottery and mosaic projects.

The Canvas Roadshow (25 S. River Road, Bedford, 913-9217, thecanvasroadshow.com) Offers DIY workshops for creating custom wood signs, canvas paintings, sea glass art and more.

Wild Salamander Creative Arts Center (30 Ash St., Hollis, 465-9453, wildsalamander.com) Offers a variety of art classes and workshops for all ages.

Music and performing arts classes/workshops

Concord Community Music School (23 Wall St., Concord, 228-1196, ccmusicschool.org)

The Majestic Theatre (880 Page St., Manchester, 669-7469, majestictheatre.net)

Manchester Community Music School (2291 Elm St., Manchester, 644-4548, mcmusicschool.org)

Manchester Music Mill (329 Elm St., Manchester, 623-8022, manchestermusicmill.com)

Nashua Community Music School (5 Pine St. Ext., Nashua, 881-7030, nashuacms.org)

New Hampshire Theatre Project (West End Studio Theatre, 959 Islington St., No. 3, Portsmouth, 431-6644, nhtheatreproject.org)

NH Tunes (250 Commercial St., No. 2017, Manchester, 660-2208, nhtunes.biz)

Ted Herbert Music School (922 Elm St., Manchester, 669-9191, tedherbert.com)

The Flying Monkey (39 Main St., Plymouth, 536-2551, flyingmonkeynh.com)

Featured Photo: Shop handmade gifts at The Craftworkers’ Guild’s holiday fair. Courtesy photo.

The Art Roundup 21/12/02

The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

Three weekends of Nutcracker: The Nutcracker will be performed at the Dana Center (Saint Anselm College, 100 Saint Anselm Dr., Manchester) for the next three weekends by different local dance companies. Bedford Dance Center will perform on Saturday, Dec. 4, at 6 p.m. Tickets cost $25. Then, Dance Visions Network will perform on Sunday, Dec. 12, with shows at 12:30 and 5:30 p.m. Tickets cost $22. Finally, Ballet Misha will perform on Saturday, Dec. 18, with shows at 1 and 6 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 19, with shows at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Tickets cost $26. Visit anselm.edu/dana-center-humanities.

Experiential dance: Manchester art gallery Kelley Stelling Contemporary presents an experiential dance performance in partnership with the New Hampshire Dance Collaborative on Thursday, Dec. 2, at 5:30 p.m. at the Kimball Jenkins Estate (266 N. Main St., Concord). There will be four featured dancers — Kelly Diamond, Alyssa Desruisseaux, Anthony Bounphakhom and Sallie Werst — with catered hors d’oeuvres and drinks, complimentary with admission. The performance is an extension of Kelley Stelling’s new exhibit, “The Dysfunction of Social Practice,” which is on view in the Jill C. Wilson Gallery of the Estate now through Jan. 14. Tickets cost $50 and are available on the Kimball Jenkins website. Attendees must be fully vaccinated. Visit kelleystellingcontemporary.com and kimballjenkins.com, or call 225-3932.

Open for the holidays: Several local studios and galleries are hosting holiday open houses this weekend. Stop by Studioverne Fine Art Fused Glass and Creative Framing Solutions (81 and 83R Hanover St., Manchester) on Saturday, Dec. 4, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., where you can browse and purchase work by local artisans and make your own fused glass snowman ornament for $15. There will be refreshments and live music. Visit facebook.com/verneorlosk.

The Picker Collaborative Artists (3 Pine St., Nashua) have a holiday open house on Saturday, Dec. 4, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Browse handmade items including stained glass, jewelry, woodworking, quilting, fiber arts, pottery and more, and meet the artists. Visit pickerartists.com.

Visit Art Gallery 46, located at Remember This Antiques and Collectibles (46 Route 101A, Amherst) on Saturday, Dec. 4, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and browse paintings by seven local artists, who will be on site to talk about their work. Visit facebook.com/artgallery46.

Festive projects: Twiggs Gallery (254 King St., Boscawen) will have a series of holiday craft workshops on Sunday, Dec. 5. From 10 a.m. to noon visitors can make a holiday boxwood tree centerpiece and decorate it with their choice of color theme, holiday decor and fresh flowers. The cost is $70. Then, from noon to 3:30 p.m., make a tiny book ornament that, when opened, transforms into a three-dimensional star. The cost is $75. The final workshop of the day, which runs from 1 to 3 p.m., is a wintry balsam door-hanging wreath. The cost is $70. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com.

Joyful chorus: Get in the holiday spirit with some choral music this weekend.

The Nashua Choral Society performs its holiday concert, “Season of Lights,” on Sunday, Dec. 5, at 3 p.m. at Immaculate Conception Church (216 E. Dunstable Road, Nashua). Tickets cost $20 for adults and $10 for students. Admission is free for children. Visit nashuachoralsociety.org.

The New Hampshire Gay Men’s Chorus presents its holiday concert series, “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year,” on Saturday, Dec. 4, at 7:30 p.m. at Londonderry United Methodist Church (258 Mammoth Road, Londonderry), and Sunday, Dec. 5, at 4 p.m. at Wesley United Methodist Church (79 Clinton St., Concord). Tickets cost $20 for adults; admission is free for children ages 12 and under. Visit nhgmc.com.

Ring in the season

The Granite State Ringers handbell choir returns with its holiday concert series, “Who Has Seen the Wind?” with shows on Sunday, Dec. 5, at 2:30 p.m. at St. Paul’s Methodist Church (335 Smyth Road, Manchester), and Saturday, Dec. 11, at 2 p.m. at the Sandown Town Hall (320 Main St., Sandown). Tickets cost $10 in advance and $12 at the door for the Dec. 5 show. The Dec. 11 show is free, but reservations are required. Visit granitestateringers.org or call 647-7322.


ART

Exhibits

• “WPA IN NH: PHILIP GUSTON AND MUSA MCKIM” Exhibit features a pair of 14-foot monumental murals painted by artist Philip Guston and poet and painter Musa McKim for the Federal forestry building in Laconia, New Hampshire, in 1941. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester). On view now through Dec. 5. Museum admission tickets cost $15, $13 for seniors age 65 and up, and must be booked online. Call 669-6144 or visit currier.org.

• “AROUND NEW HAMPSHIRE” On exhibit at the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce’s Visitor Center, 49 S. Main St., Concord, on view now through Dec. 16. Featuring the work of New Hampshire Art Association member Elaine Farmer, the exhibit features her oil paintings embodying New Hampshire’s iconic views and ideals, ranging from mountain lakes and birch tree woods to historic landmarks. Visit concordnhchamber.com or nhartassociation.org.

• “SLEIGHBELL STUDIO” Annual holiday showcase at Twiggs Gallery featuring a wide selection of fine art, jewelry, cards, books, honeys, soaps and more, all locally made and priced affordably for gift buying. Now through Dec. 18. 254 King St., Boscawen. Gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday, from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com or call 975-0015.

CRAFTWORKERS’ GUILD HOLIDAY FAIR Features seasonal decor, photography, fine art and prints, cards, gourmet treats, woodworking, fiber and fabric, stained and fused glass, mixed media, jewelry and more by juried local artists and craftspeople. Now through Dec. 23. In-person shopping at the historic Kendall House (3A Meetinghouse Road, Bedford), open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and an online shop. Visit craftworkersguild.org.

• “SMALL WORKS BIG IMPACT” Creative Ventures Gallery presents its annual holiday exhibit in-person at the gallery (411 Nashua St., Milford) and virtually on the gallery’s website (creativeventuresfineart.com/product-category/small-works-show). The exhibit features non-juried small works of art in a variety of media and styles, created by area professional and nonprofessional artists, priced affordably for holiday gift buying. Now through Dec. 31. Visit creativeventuresfineart.com or call 672-2500.

• “LET IT SNOW” The New Hampshire Art Association presents its holiday exhibition. Robert Lincoln Levy Gallery (136 State St., Portsmouth). Now through Jan. 2. Features works in a variety of media, as well as books and cards for sale. Opening reception on Fri., Dec. 3, from 5 to 8 p.m. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. Visit nhartassociation.org.

EMILY NOELLE LAMBERT Solo exhibition by New York City artist Emily Noelle Lambert. Dana Center for the Humanities at Saint Anselm College (100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester). On view now through Jan. 9. Masks required inside the gallery. Visit anselm.edu/dana-center-humanities or call 641-7700.

THEATER

Shows

•​ PETER PAN The Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) presents. Now through Dec. 23, with showtimes on Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m., and Sunday at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $32 to $50. Visit seacoastrep.org.

DICKENS’ A CHRISTMAS CAROL The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Dec. 3 through Dec. 19. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

THE TOYMAKER’S APPRENTICE The Players’ Ring Theatre presents. 105 Marcy St., Portsmouth. Dec. 4 through Dec. 19, with showtimes on Saturday and Sunday at 10 a.m. and noon. Tickets cost $25 for adults, $22 for students and seniors age 65 and up and $15 for kids under age 12. Visit playersring.org or call 436-8123.

CONEY ISLAND CHRISTMAS The Pinkerton Players present. Stockbridge Theatre (5 Pinkerton St., Derry). Fri., Dec. 10, and Sat., Dec. 11, at 7 p.m., and Sun., Dec. 12, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $15 for adults and $10 for students and seniors. Visit stockbridgetheatre.com.

SCROOGE IN LOVEThe Majestic Theatre presents. Derry Opera House (29 W. Broadway, Derry). Fri., Dec. 10, at 7 p.m., Sat., Dec. 11, at 2 and 7 p.m., and Sun., Dec. 12, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20 for adults and $15 for seniors age 65 and up and students age 17 and under. Visit majestictheatre.net.

•​ RUDOLPH THE RED NOSED REINDEER The Palace Youth Theatre presents. Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester). Tues., Dec. 14, and Wed., Dec. 15, at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $12 to $15. Visit palacetheatre.org or call 668-5588.

TRUE TALES LIVE Monthly showcase of storytellers. Held virtually via Zoom. Last Tuesday of the month, 7 p.m., Now through December. Visit truetaleslivenh.org.

SCENE CHANGES Produced by New World Theatre. The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Jan. 7 through Jan. 23. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

MARY & ME Produced by Glass Dove Productions. The Hatbox Theatre (Steeplegate Mall, 270 Loudon Road, Concord). Jan. 28 through Feb. 13. Showtimes are on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 for adults, $19 for students, seniors and members and $16 for senior members. Visit hatboxnh.com.

Classical

GRANITE STATE RINGERS Handbell choir presents its holiday concert series. Shows on Sun., Dec. 5, 2:30 p.m., at St. Paul’s Methodist Church (335 Smyth Road, Manchester); and Sat., Dec. 11, 2 p.m., at 320 Main St. in Sandown. Tickets cost $20 for adults and $15 for kids age 10 and under for the Nov. 28 show and $10 in advance and $12 at the door for the Dec. 5 show. The Dec. 11 show is free, but reservations are required. Visit granitestateringers.org.

HOLIDAY POPS The New Hampshire Philharmonic performs holiday music. Sat., Dec. 18, 7:30 p.m., and Sun., Dec. 19, 2 p.m. Seifert Performing Arts Center, 44 Geremonty Drive, Salem. Tickets cost $30 for adults, $25 for seniors and $8 for students. Visit nhphil.org.

• “IT’S THE MOST WONDERFUL TIME OF THE YEAR” The New Hampshire Gay Men’s Chorus presents its holiday concert series. Shows on Sat., Dec. 4, 7:30 p.m., at Londonderry United Methodist Church (258 Mammoth Road, Londonderry); Sun., Dec. 5, 4 p.m., at Wesley United Methodist Church (79 Clinton St., Concord); Sat., Dec. 11, 7:30 p.m., at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church (22 Fox Run Road, Newington); and Sun., Dec. 12, 4 p.m., at The Derryfield School (2108 River Road, Manchester). Tickets cost $20 for adults; admission is free for children ages 12 and under. Visit nhgmc.com.

HOLIDAY SPECTACULAR The Lakes Region Symphony Orchestra performs. Fri., Dec. 10, at 7 p.m., at Colonial Theatre of Laconia (617 Main St., Laconia); and Sat., Dec. 11, at 7 p.m., and Sun., Dec. 12, at 3 p.m., at the Inter-Lakes Community Auditorium (Route 25, Meredith). Tickets cost $10 to $20 for students and $20 to $30 for adults for the Dec. 10 show, and $10 for students and $25 for adults for the shows on Dec. 11 and Dec. 12. Visit lrso.org.

HOLIDAY POPS Symphony NH performs. Sat., Dec. 11, at 7:30 p.m., at the Keefe Center for the Arts (117 Elm St., Nashua); and Sun., Dec. 12, at 3 p.m., at the Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord). Tickets range from $20 to $60 for adults, from $18 to $55 for seniors age 65+, and are free for children. Visit symphonynh.org.

• “A CELEBRATION OF CHRISTMAS” The Souhegan Valley Chorus performs its holiday concert. Sat., Dec. 11, at 7 p.m. Souhegan High School (412 Boston Post Road, Amherst). Tickets are available at the door and cost $15 for adults and $12 for students and seniors. Visit souheganvalleychorus.org.

Shop festively

Midnight Merriment returns to downtown Concord

After a year without Merriment, shoppers looking for unique, local gifts are invited to return to downtown Concord’s traditional Midnight Merriment event for a night of shopping along with holiday festivities like caroling, s’mores and photos with Santa.

Happening Friday, Dec. 3, from 5 p.m. to midnight, the event has been Covid-modified to keep it safe. The Concord Arts Market Winter Giftopolis, for example, is typically held in the atrium at Eagle Square, but this year the artists will be stationed at businesses in and around downtown. And Santa will be there, but he’ll be wearing a mask, and photos will be taken from afar to allow for social distancing.

“We definitely took into consideration where we’re at right now with Covid,” said Jess Martin, Director of Intown Concord. “But a lot of the businesses depend on this event. … The real highlight is the shopping.”

Martin said a lot of downtown stores will be offering sales and specials that night.

“We’re really trying to encourage people to shop local, especially after last year … [and we’re] trying to create a festive shopping experience,” she said.

The event officially starts at 5 p.m., and there will be strolling carolers and piped-in holiday music. At 5:30 p.m., the hot cocoa and s’mores stations will open up, DJ Nazzy’s Holiday Dance Party will begin, and Santa will set up shop at New Hampshire Federal Credit Union for socially distanced photo opportunities. Santa’s helpers will be there to collect gift cards and homemade holiday cards for the Santa for Seniors donation drive, which will go to seniors in the local community.

Throughout the event, visitors can participate in the Winter Giftopolis Art Walk, which takes the place of the Winter Giftopolis in Eagle Square that typically sees large crowds in the confined space.

“We were always just packed to the gills. … It didn’t seem Covid-safe,” said Christa Zuber, producer of the Concord Arts Market. “So we changed it to an art walk around the city, on Main Street [or nearby].”

She said some artists will be set up in busier retail locations, like Gondwana, while others will be at places like the Concord Chamber of Commerce office — “not your typical shopping spot,” Zuber said.

There are a couple dozen vendors this year, about the same as usual, Zuber said.

“We have everything from jewelers to … homemade personal care, soaps, paintings, traditional holiday crafts … a knitter who makes her own yarn … a little bit of everything,” she said.

Zuber is hopeful that the change in format will introduce new customers to the Concord Artists Market, since the artists will be more integrated into the community this year. She said people going to Concord Craft Brewing Co. for a beer, for example, might not be thinking about Christmas shopping or art, so having an artist there could inspire them; likewise, someone who’s never been to Concord Craft Brewing might go in to see the artist and decide to grab a drink.

“I think the biggest challenge is just making sure people know where to find our artists,” Zuber said.

Each of the vendors will have a map, and there’s one on the Concord Arts Market’s Facebook page too.

Sue McCoo, owner of Capitol Craftsman Romance Jewelers, Viking House and Hilltop Consignment, has been taking part in Midnight Merriment since it started almost 30 years ago and is looking forward to the event’s return.

“It was just strange not having it [last year],” she said. “It’s fun to come downtown when there’s bustling crowds. … It’s also fun when people aren’t in a hurry.”

McCoo said the Halloween Howl was very well-attended, so she said as long as the weather is OK, it should be a good night for businesses.

“The holiday season is always fun just across the board,” she said. “Midnight Merriment always, to me, feels like you’re waiting for Jimmy Stewart to show up.”

Midnight Merriment

When: Friday, Dec. 3, 5 p.m. to midnight
Where: Downtown Concord
Holiday activities: Shopping and the Winter Giftopolis Art Walk will be open throughout the event. From 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., DJ Nazzy will host his Holiday Dance Party. S’mores and hot cocoa stations will be open from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Santa will be at New Hampshire Federal Credit Union for socially distanced photo opportunities from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. All activities are free.

Featured Photo: Midnight Merriment. Courtesy photo.

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