Treasure Hunt 23/09/14

Hello, Donna.
I’m trying to find out any information on these children’s toys. My main question is would they be safe for my granddaughter to play with now?
Claire

Dear Claire,
What you have seems to be a mixture of children’s tin cooking toys. Age-wise I think anywhere from the 1950’s through the 1970’s.

Some of the pans look like ones from my childhood, Easy-Bake oven pans!
There is a collectible market for the older pans and Easy-Bake ones as well. Values are in the range of $5 to $10. As to whether they are usable today, I say yes for pretend food but not for real food. And only if they are clean with no rust or damage.

Because I am in the antiques business, my grandchildren play with lots of older toys with my supervision. I enjoy telling them stories of how toys made it through so much time.

Claire, thanks for sharing and have fun playing with your granddaughter.

Donna Welch has spent more than 35 years in the antiques and collectibles field, appraising and instructing. Her new location is an Antique Art Studio located in Dunbarton, NH where she is still buying and selling. She is a member of The New Hampshire Antiques Dealer Association. If you have questions about an antique or collectible send a clear photo and information to Donna at footwdw@aol.com, or call her at 391-6550.

Treasure Hunt 23/09/07

Dear Donna,
Can you give me a reason to not toss this item? Found in the attic of my parents. Looks to be building blocks but all pretty much the same. Any help appreciated.
Stacy in Andover

Dear Stacy,
Your box of blocks is actually from the late Victorian Era into the early 1900s. It’s a self-contained building block toy. In this case it would construct a mansion-type building. There were many different ones made. When you’re done playing, it all tucks away back into the wood box.
Stacy, the value is in having a complete set. With blocks or doors, roofs or other pieces missing the values drop. Complete and in good clean shape these tend to run in the $150+ range.

So now you have to figure out if it’s complete. Building it is one way, or doing further research on this one and seeing the complete version.

I hope this was helpful to you. Thanks for sharing, Stacy.

Donna Welch has spent more than 35 years in the antiques and collectibles field, appraising and instructing. Her new location is an Antique Art Studio located in Dunbarton, NH where she is still buying and selling. She is a member of The New Hampshire Antiques Dealer Association. If you have questions about an antique or collectible send a clear photo and information to Donna at footwdw@aol.com, or call her at 391-6550.

Treasure Hunt 23/08/31

Hello, Donna —

I’m trying to get any information that you may know about this rocker. I’m not positive what century it’s from but I was told 19th by my mum. — Melanie

Dear Melanie,

Your rocker is called a stick-style rocker. The age your mom gave you is correct. It’s from the late 1800s to early 1900s, the late Victorian Era. It appears to be in original condition and in good shape for the age.

The values are tough. Antique rockers are not in high demand in this generation. The value should be in the range of $50. — Donna

Treasure Hunt 23/08/24

Hello, Donna,

Can you help me identify this piece of iron? It looks to be all there but I can’t figure it out. Thinking maybe to hold a lamp?

Thanks ahead for any help.

Skip

Dear Skip,

You are right, it is all there, but it wasn’t meant for a lamp. It’s a Victorian gutter holder.

How beautiful it must have been to see several of these in a row holding up a rain gutter. Built to last and have beauty to them too.

The value for one might be minimal. The value for a dozen or so would be in the $200+ range. If you own a Victorian home today a priceless find.

Thanks, Skip, for sharing.

Treasure Hunt 23/08/17

Dear Donna,

My wife and I spotted this set of items at an estate sale in Manchester. They were in the old kitchen, where there were many types of baking molds. But we’re not sure about these.

They are very heavy metal and seem to be more decorative than utilitarian. We “negotiated” and paid a couple bucks for them. They make nice candle holders on our porch table.

Thanking you in advance.

Scott

Nashua

Dear Scott,

Even though I think the form of the flower cups is sweet, I think they could be modern and you are right to say decorative. Sometimes even modern items have charm and a place in our home. That’s coming from an antique enthusiast! (ha ha)

With no markings on them, appraisal can be tough. But all the pictures you sent were helpful. I do think you got a treasure for the price. As far as a modern value on them, I think that’s in the eye of the buyer. Having a purpose for them makes them priceless to you and your wife.

Thanks for sharing and keep going to those estate sales. You never know what you can find.

Treasure Hunt 23/08/10

Good morning, Donna.

I’m wondering if you appraise 33 and 45 records. Or can you help with someone who can for me? They are earlier musicians from before the 1970s.

Thank you.

Marie

Dear Marie,

I thought your question was an important one. Even though records are not in my direct field, I have had many over the years through estates.

They seem to be collectible in this generation. Marie, I would start off by contacting a record store directly (I used to deal with The Music Connection in Manchester) to see if they could provide you info and possibly purchase as well. If not, they might have outside sources for that purpose.

My personal experience is that condition is important and prices for original ones with cover etc. can range from $1 to over $100.

I hope this was helpful, Marie, and good luck with your records.

Donna

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