Music, beer and bounce houses

Find fun for everyone in the family at Concord’s annual Market Days

By Zachary Lewis
zlewis@hippopress.com

The 50th annual Market Days Festival in Concord, put on by the nonprofit group Intown Concord, runs from Thursday, June 20, to Saturday, June 22, from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. in the city’s downtown with more than 160 vendors, live music, games, food, crafts, goodies and of course beer.

“We have a lot of really interesting, diverse vendors this year,” said Jessica Martin, Executive Director of Intown Concord.

There will be three beer gardens and they all accept cash and cards. The Main Street Beer Tent will be open 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. all three days of the festival and they will have Bud Light, Market Haze, or 603 Summatime ale on tap as well as two varieties of seltzers from 603 and a non-alcoholic IPA from Athletic Brewing Co., with prices ranging from $5 to $9. One dollar from every purchase of Concord Craft Brewing Market Haze IPA will go to support Intown Concord — they made this beer specifically for the festival.

“It’s a delicious, very drinkable, ‘summer vibes’ beer,” Martin said.

Penuche’s Outdoor Beer Garden in Bicentennial Square will be open from noon to 10 p.m. all three days right next to the HomeGrown music stage. They will have five beers on tap, as well as cans. And the Capitol Center for the Arts Beer & Wine Garden will offer a wide selection of local, craft, and microbrewery beers; red and white wine; non-alcoholic beers, soft drinks, and bottled water, with alcoholic beverages ranging from $7 to $11, and water and soft drinks for $3, according to their website.

Music will be blasting all three days from the Main Stage, in front of the Concord Food Co-op; the Home Grown Stage, near Bicentennial Square, and the Eagle Square Stage. Notable performances include Mr. Aaron, Andrew North and the Rangers, Faith Ann Band, R&B Dignity, Mary Fagan and the Honeybees, Heist, Duo Del Inferno, Llava Llama, Superbug, Supernothing, Modern Fools, Donaher and Boomsoss.

“When I first started, the performers were not compensated,” Martin said. This will be the second year when the musicians will be paid for their work through grants and donations. “We’re very proud to be able to do that and support the artists in our community.”

The Eagle Stage will have the Tandy’s Idol Competition every night from 7:30 to 10 p.m., where Concordians will be able to belt out some tunes.

The movie Dazed and Confused will be screened at the Main Stage on Thursday night and there will be a ’70s theme costume parade on Friday at 3:15 p.m. starting at Capitol Street.

“Because this is our 50th anniversary, we’re leaning into the ’70s nostalgia,” Martin said.

Continuing on that theme, the headlining performance of the Festival, taking place on Friday on from 8 to 10 p.m. the Main Stage, is The Ultimate Queen Celebration, a tribute to Queen.

Besides music and beer, there will be plenty of other activities. The KidZone will feature twobounce houses, which require tickets. All other activities on the lawn, like cornhole, hula hoops, and more, are totally free.

There will also be ax throwing, and an arcade on recycling by The Casella Resource Rover. Concord Arts Market will have lots of local artists on Pleasant Street showcasing their wares.

“I’m excited about all the different types of vendors we’ve been able to bring in this year in addition to some of the ones that have been with us for a long time…,” Martin said.

Starting off the shindig on Thursday, June 20, at 10 a.m. will be a music and movement class held by Miss Heather and Miss Heidi from Concord Community Music School for children 5 months to 8 years old on the Statehouse lawn, underneath the tree closest to the capitol, according to the website. This will be followed by storytime in the same location offered by the Concord Public Library, and there will be some iteration of this until 4 p.m., when The Bee Skep Puppet Theatre presents “Marionette Melodies” for kids between ages 3 to 12.

Over by the City Plaza before the arches, The Flying Gravity Circus from Wilton will perform tricks and will also be hosting a circus workshop for novice jugglers and tight-rope walkers in training. They will perform in the street throughout the festival too. “What they are going to be teaching will be cool,” Martin said.

Friday, June 21, starts off in a similar vein with music, movement and story time for the little ones under the Statehouse lawn tree, and the puppet show too, with the addition of reptiles from Tanglewood Hollow, like Clemintine the Snake, around 1 p.m.

Worthy Mind and Movement will be presenting a ’90s music themed yoga class at noon at the Statehouse lawn, and 2 Home Fitness will lead participants through agility and strengths drills by City Plaza before the arches.

Friday also has jazzercise from Thrive Fitness as well as their POP Pilates/UBEAT Barre, which they describe as a powerful fusion of music strength, and choreography fun for all ages. Attendees can also enjoy a Zumba Class with Sindy Chown from Barranquilla Flavor.

On Saturday, June 22, similar events will be held but there will also be new additions to the festivities. From 10 a.m to 5 p.m. local scouts from Scouting America Pack & Troop 90 & Pack 270 will be on the Statehouse lawn for fun activities and classes and the Boys & Girls Club will have kids’ activities on a different area of the lawn from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Mr. Matt from Concord Community Music School will lead a drum circle and Miss Audrey will head a folk jam session; those will take place from noon to 2 p.m. at the Statehouse.

At 2 p.m. the 501st and Rebel Legions – The Star Wars Fan Costuming Group arrives at the Statehouse lawn next to the bounce houses from a galaxy far, far away; they will be there until they get their hyperdrive fixed around 6 p.m. There is also a roller derby presentation, balloon animals, and a traditional Newari dance and from 7 to 11 p.m., and the Capitol Center for the Arts will be hosting a silent disco.

Concord is excited for the upcoming Market Days Festival. “They look forward to it. It’s a staple of Concord at this point…,” Martin said. “It’s definitely a beloved community event for sure.”

Market Days
Where: Downtown Concord, Main Street
When: Thursday, June 20, through Saturday, June 22, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. each day
Info: marketdaysfestival.com

KidZone Bounce House Tickets
$3 for 1 ticket/ 1 bounce
$5 for 3 tickets/ 3 bounces (all proceeds support Intown Concord)

Market Days Eats

According to the event’s website, marketdaysfestival.com, here are some of the scheduled food vendors with the site’s descriptions:

Artisan Hill Treats: Small batch marshmallows, chocolates and sweets
Batulo’s Kitchen: Somali-inspired cuisine
Brother’s Cortado: Coffee and beverages
Buba Kitchen: authentic Asian noodle dishes
Bubble Bee Milk Tea: Bubble tea and dumplings
Bueno Burrito: burritos, tacos, quesadillas and salads
Cali Arepa NH: authentic Colombian street food
Canterbury Kettle Corn
Carolyn’s Creamee: Ice cream
Chubba Wubba’s Sweets, Snacks & Refreshments: bubble tea, slushies organic smoothies, and smoothie bowls.
Curry Leaf: the flavors of India’s many regions
Deadproof Pizza Co.
Dudley’s Concessions: ice cream, fried dough, funnel cake and fried Oreos
Gina Foods: pasta, pizza, paninis, salads, desserts
Holly Fried Dough
Kona Ice
Let the Dough Roll: donut ice cream cones
Live Juice
Maddy’s Food Hub: authentic African flavors, jollof rice, plantains
Phily’s Good Eats: poutine fries, Italian sausage, steak & cheese & gluten-free arepas
Pours & Petals: beverages and desserts
Puppy Love Hot Dogs
Revelstoke: coffee and tea
Roadside Diner
Rubins Hot Sauce
Sandi’s Concessions: cotton candy, candy and caramel apples & more
Sillie Puffs: Gourmet Cotton Candy
Simply Cannoli: cannolis and espresso
Tea Garden Restaurant: traditional Chinese cuisine
Teatotaller: bubble tea and food
Tommy’s Pizzeria
Wicked Tasty: lobster rolls, ice cream sandwich, desserts, sandwiches, burgers and poutine loaded fries
Yankee Farmer’s Market: Buffalo-Buffalo burgers, Buffalo cheesesteaks, Buffalo sausage & more

    Featured Photo: Market Days Festival in Concord. Courtesy photo.

    The Art Roundup 24/06/20

    The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities

    Curtain calls: The Palace Theatre’s (80 Hanover St. in Manchester; palacetheatre.org) production of 42nd Street offers five shows in its final weekend: Thursday, June 20, at 7:30 p.m.; Friday, June 21, at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, June 22, at 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, June 23, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $38 to $59. See Michael Witthaus’ look at the production in the June 6 issue of the Hippo on page 14 (hippopress.com to find the e-edition).

    On stage:Sleuth is presented by The Majestic Academy of Dramatic Arts on Friday, June 21, at 7 p.m., Saturday, June 22, at 2 and 7 p.m., and Sunday, June 23, at 2 p.m. at the Majestic Theatre (880 Page St., Manchester, majestictheatre.net, 669-7469). As described on the website, the show presents the ultimate game of cat and mouse played out in a cozy English country house owned by ca elebrated mystery writer whose guest is a young rival who shares his love for games. Tickets are $15 and $20.

    Craft: Hall Memorial Library (18 Park St. in Northfield; hallmemoriallibrary.org, 286-8971) will hold a Summer Craft Show on Saturday, June 22, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

    Premiere:The Nashua Historical Society at The Florence H. Speare Memorial Museum (5 Abbott St., Nashua) will be hosting the premiere of the documentary ​At Home and Abroad: Nashua and World War II on Saturday, June 22, at 11:30 a.m. and at 1 p.m., according to their website. The documentary chronicles the stories of civilians, veterans and Holocaust survivors as Nashuans share personal and family World War II stories. The film was created by local filmmakers John Sadd and Jeremy Frazier. The showing is free and open to the public. Doors open at 11 a.m. Visit nashuahistoricalsociety.org.

    Fest in the Clouds: Castle in the Clouds in Moultonborough is hosting its second annual Community Arts Festival on Saturday, June 22, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The festival will feature more than 100 booths with the works of local crafters, artists and community organizations and attendees can look forward to a scavenger hunt, art activities for kids, and other events, according to a press release. Seecastleintheclouds.org.

    Symphony Saturday: The Boston Civic Symphony with Conductor Fransico Noya and Pianist Frederick Moyer will perform Saint-Saëns Piano Concerto No. 2 in G minor Op. 22, Chevalier de Saint-Georges – Symphony Op 11 No. 2, and Brahms Symphony No. 4 in E minor at Colby-Sawyer College’s Sawyer Center Theater (541 Main St., New Boston) on Saturday, June 22, from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 for adults and $5 for students. Visit summermusicassociates.org or call 526-8234.

    Outdoor theater: The annual mainstage production for the Prescott Park Arts Festival in Portsmouth opens Friday, June 21, when Legally Blonde The Musical hits the stage at 7 p.m. The show runs most Thursdays through Sundays until Aug. 11, all at 7 p.m. with matinées on Sunday, June 30 and Sunday, July 28 at 1 pm, according to prescottpark.org where you can find information on reservations.

    WHAT IF? SHAKESPEARE
    Cue Zero Theatre Company at the Arts Academy of New Hampshire (19 Keewaydin Drive, Salem, onthestage.tickets/cue-zero-theatre-company) presents William Shakespseare’s Long Lost First Play (Abridged) on Friday, June 21, at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, June 22, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, June 23, at 2 p.m. Tickets are $15. In this play, an ancient manuscript proves to be the long-lost first play written by none other than 17-year-old William Shakespeare from Stratford, according to the company’s website, which says they “are totally not completely making this up.”

    MUSICAL HORROR PUPPETS
    Puppeteers for Fears, Oregon’s only dedicated puppet musical horror troupe, will perform their original show Cthulhu: the Musical!on Wednesday, June 26, at 7:30 p.m. at CapitolCenter for the Arts BNH Stage (16 S. Main St., Concord) as part of the company’s 2024 summer tour, according to a press release. As described in the press release, the play is adapted from the 1929 short story “The Call of Cthulhu” by H.P. Lovecraft and tells the story of his most famous creation, Cthulhu, a giant, malevolent, octopus-faced elder god who hibernates beneath the ocean, communicating to humans through their dreams, slowly driving them mad. In a statement, PFF Artistic Director Josh Gross said, “We are always looking to turn classic themes on their head instead of rehashing tired storylines…. When I said, ‘Cthulhu: the Musical,’ for the first time, a bunch of heads immediately turned in my direction, and strangers started asking where they could see it. So I knew we had to do that as a show, even though the challenge of turning something so dark into musical comedy was pretty daunting. … There was a lot of comedy to be found and this show is so much fun to perform.” Tickets are $25 and the show is intended for those 18 and older since the material is R-rated, according to the press release.

    Zachary Lewis

    Family business

    Jersey Boys at Winnipesaukee Playhouse

    By Michael Witthaus
    mwitthaus@hippopress.com

    Along with being a jukebox musical about a great American vocal group, Jersey Boys has a lot of drama. The director of an upcoming production of the show at Winnipesaukee Playhouse believes that experiencing it is akin to buying a theater ticket and a concert ticket at the same time.

    The Tony-winning musical, opening June 21, follows the Four Seasons vocal group’s arc of success, a path marked by triumph and tragedy. Iconic songs include “Sherry,” “Rag Doll,” “Big Girls Don’t Cry” and “Can’t Take My Eyes Off You,” but the human stories — music and the mob, frayed family ties and other struggles — are equally compelling.

    “I think there’s a tendency to assume with a show like this that we’re just going to sing and have some fun,” Teisha Duncan said in a recent phone interview. “But these are people who lived, who we can easily access stories about. They’re building a full-bodied production of character work. It’s not just about being able to sing the part and having these distinct voices.”

    Jersey Boys is Duncan’s third production in three years with the Meredith theater, and her first musical. A Black Jamaican woman, Duncan didn’t expect to direct the show.

    “It’s very rare that they give me things that are very much concentrated in a part of American history,” she said, “but I grew up listening to the Jersey Boys, I knew Frankie Valli. It’s very much a part of our canon, the music.”

    She’s also spent time on stage in the musical theater world, acting in Disney’s The Lion King and The Color Purple and others. Jersey Boys is a bigger challenge, though.

    “This is my first jukebox musical that I’m directing and at this scale of work,” she said, and expressed gratitude for the opportunity. “Even though it’s a separate part of my artistry, I’m glad that they trusted that I know the genre enough to direct it.”

    It’s an eagerly anticipated show; already, tickets are selling faster than any production in the playhouse’s history. It’s also an ambitious undertaking, with a set that can be quickly reconfigured for more than 50 scene changes, including the Brill Building, nightclubs, New York City bridges and even a state penitentiary.

    “It has to transition in real time,” Duncan said. “And it’s exciting to experiment with that, to see how we can create continuity through these transitions and relationships so there isn’t a moment where the audience has to wait for a setup. All of that happens as a rolling pattern.”

    An all-female creative team includes Duncan, choreographer Chloe Kounadis and musical director Judy Hayward. The cast has a few returning members like New York actress Drea Campo, part of the Playhouse production of [title of show] last summer, and a lot of fresh faces.

    “We have a nice blend of newbies to both the show as well as the theater house, and they’re all excited about it,” Duncan said. “Some of them have done the show, but they’ve played other roles. Our Frankie, I think he played DiCarlo in the last production, and our DiCarlo played Guardio.”

    When asked to name her favorite part of the show, Duncan recalled audience response the night it was announced for the 2024 season, and the era’s evocative power.

    Successful theaters “have a conversation with their community, and they listen to them,” she began. “They want to connect to parts of their life and memories that are exciting and create theater that’s reflective of who lives in [and] engages with that community, the parts of their memory that pull them back to what makes them happiest.”

    The cheers and applause that greeted news of Jersey Boys still rings in her ears, she said.

    “It feels like that dialogue between the Winnipesaukee Theatre and the community members is actually happening, and we want to keep that conversation strong,” she said. “We want people to come in and really tap into those beautiful memories. There is a specific sound of Frankie Valli & the Four Seasons. You hear that song, and you’re right into that. It brings out some of the happiest memories of most people’s lives. So, I love that about Jersey Boys.

    Curtain calls: The Palace Theatre’s (80 Hanover St. in Manchester; palacetheatre.org) production of 42nd Street offers five shows in its final weekend: Thursday, June 20, at 7:30 p.m.; Friday, June 21, at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, June 22, at 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, June 23, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $38 to $59. See Michael Witthaus’ look at the production in the June 6 issue of the Hippo on page 14 (hippopress.com to find the e-edition).

    On stage:Sleuth is presented by The Majestic Academy of Dramatic Arts on Friday, June 21, at 7 p.m., Saturday, June 22, at 2 and 7 p.m., and Sunday, June 23, at 2 p.m. at the Majestic Theatre (880 Page St., Manchester, majestictheatre.net, 669-7469). As described on the website, the show presents the ultimate game of cat and mouse played out in a cozy English country house owned by ca elebrated mystery writer whose guest is a young rival who shares his love for games. Tickets are $15 and $20.

    Craft: Hall Memorial Library (18 Park St. in Northfield; hallmemoriallibrary.org, 286-8971) will hold a Summer Craft Show on Saturday, June 22, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

    Premiere:The Nashua Historical Society at The Florence H. Speare Memorial Museum (5 Abbott St., Nashua) will be hosting the premiere of the documentary ​At Home and Abroad: Nashua and World War II on Saturday, June 22, at 11:30 a.m. and at 1 p.m., according to their website. The documentary chronicles the stories of civilians, veterans and Holocaust survivors as Nashuans share personal and family World War II stories. The film was created by local filmmakers John Sadd and Jeremy Frazier. The showing is free and open to the public. Doors open at 11 a.m. Visit nashuahistoricalsociety.org.

    Fest in the Clouds: Castle in the Clouds in Moultonborough is hosting its second annual Community Arts Festival on Saturday, June 22, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The festival will feature more than 100 booths with the works of local crafters, artists and community organizations and attendees can look forward to a scavenger hunt, art activities for kids, and other events, according to a press release. Seecastleintheclouds.org.

    Symphony Saturday: The Boston Civic Symphony with Conductor Fransico Noya and Pianist Frederick Moyer will perform Saint-Saëns Piano Concerto No. 2 in G minor Op. 22, Chevalier de Saint-Georges – Symphony Op 11 No. 2, and Brahms Symphony No. 4 in E minor at Colby-Sawyer College’s Sawyer Center Theater (541 Main St., New Boston) on Saturday, June 22, from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 for adults and $5 for students. Visit summermusicassociates.org or call 526-8234.

    Outdoor theater: The annual mainstage production for the Prescott Park Arts Festival in Portsmouth opens Friday, June 21, when Legally Blonde The Musical hits the stage at 7 p.m. The show runs most Thursdays through Sundays until Aug. 11, all at 7 p.m. with matinées on Sunday, June 30 and Sunday, July 28 at 1 pm, according to prescottpark.org where you can find information on reservations.

    Jersey
    When: June 21 through July 6, Fridays and Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m.; Saturdays, Tuesdays and Thursdays , 2 and 7:30 p.m.
    Where: Winnipesaukee Playhouse, 33 Footlight Circle, Meredith
    Tickets: $25 to $52 at the winnipesaukeeplayhouse.org

    Kids’ Guide to Summer

    Now that school is out, it’s time to get serious about having big summer fun.

    Looking for places to go and things to do with the kids? Here are some ideas for events, sports, live performances of both music and theater, arts events, library fun and movies that are great for kid and family fun.

    Need more? Check out hippopress.com for our e-editions of some past guides to help plan summer excitement. In the June 6 issue — “Berry Delicious” — we look at some places to pick your own strawberries, blueberries and raspberries as they come into season and offer a list of farmers markets, which can make for a tasty family outing. In the Feb. 29 issue — “Summer of Adventure” — we run down a list of area day camps. Sure, many of those required sign-up back in January, but plans change and openings may be available.

    Did we miss your favorite bit of family summer fun? Let us know at adiaz@hippopress.com.

    Fairs, Festivals & Celebrations

    • Take a trip to the coast for the 24th Hampton Beach Master Sand Sculpting Classic, happening from Thursday, June 20, to Saturday, June 22. Prizes will be awarded for the best sand sculptures. The sculptures will be lighted for nightly viewing through June 26. Visit hamptonbeach.org.

    Plaistow’s Old Home Day returns for a three-day celebration beginning with a Kids Fest on Thursday, June 20, from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Town Hall Green. Younger citizens and their families are welcome to participate in games, entertainment and activities centered around kids. Friday, June 21, there will be a Decades Dance from 6 to 10 pm. Saturday, June 22, celebrations will run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with local vendors on the Town Hall green (145 Main St., Plaistow) as well as a beard contest, a baby contest, raffles, entertainment booths, a parade and more. This year’s theme is “Happy Birthday, Plaistow!” to celebrate the town’s 275th anniversary. Follow the town Old Home Day’s Facebook @plaistowoldhomeday for updates.

    • Intown Concord’s 50th annual Market Days Festival runs from Thursday, June 20, to Saturday, June 22, in downtown Concord from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. See page 22 for details.

    • Join the Wilton Main Street Association for its annual Summerfest, happening on Saturday, June 22, starting at 10 a.m. and featuring an arts market, live music, food, street vendors, a pancake breakfast and a fireworks display in the evening. See visitwilton.com/summerfest.

    • Hollis holds its annual Strawberry Festival on Sunday, June 23, from 2 to 4 p.m. See page 28 for details.

    • Join the New Hampshire Farm Museum (1305 White Mountain Highway, Milton) for Fourth on the Farm, happening Saturday, June 29, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Activities include a tractor ride to see farm animals, as well as demonstrations, reenactments, a scavenger hunt, lawn games, lunch and strawberry shortcake, and live performances of songs from the 1700s and 1800s. Admission is free for members and children under 4, $12 for adults, $8 for seniors and $6 for children ages 4 to 17. A family pass can be purchased for $30. Visit nhfarmmuseum.org.

    • Manchester holds its annual Fourth of July fireworks on Wednesday, July 3. The annual parade in Amherst steps off at 10 a.m. on Thursday, July 4. Head to Nashua for some Silver Knights baseball at Holman Stadium at 11 a.m. followed by an evening of events featuring live music and fireworks at dusk. Celebrate Independence Day at one — or more — of many area town and city celebrations.

    • The Raymond Town Fair returns for its 48th year from Friday, July 12, to Sunday, July 14, at the Raymond Town Common (Epping and Main streets, Raymond). It will feature live music, family-friendly entertainment, a children’s parade, a fireworks display and more. See “Raymond Town Fair” on Facebook to keep up to date on details as they become available.

    • The New England Reptile Expo is scheduled for Sunday, July 7, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the DoubleTree by Hilton Manchester Downtown (700 Elm St., Manchester). The show features more than 200 vendor tables full of reptiles, pet supplies and more. Tickets are $12 for adults, $6 for kids ages 7 to 12 and free for kids ages 6 and under. Visit reptileexpo.com.

    • The Hillsborough Summer Festival is back again this year at Grimes Field (29 Preston St., Hillsborough) from Thursday, July 11, to Sunday, July 14, with live entertainment, carnival rides, a fireworks show on Saturday night, a 5K road race on Friday and a parade on Sunday. Festival hours are 6 to 10 p.m. on Thursday; 5 to 11 p.m. on Friday; noon to 11 p.m. on Saturday, and noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday. Admission is free. Visit hillsborosummerfest.com.

    • Returning to the grounds of American Independence Museum (1 Governors Lane, Exeter) for a 34th year is the American Independence Festival, on Saturday, July 13, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Be transported back in time with a live reading of the Declaration of Independence, and enjoy historical reenactments and colonial artisan demonstrations as well as colonial games, music and dances. Visit independencemuseum.org.

    • The Stratham 4-H Summerfest returns for a third year on Saturday, July 20, at the Stratham Hill Park Fairgrounds (270 Portsmouth Ave., Stratham). The work of 4-H volunteers and members will be on display in the 4-H building, show rings and livestock barns from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Exhibits include shows and displays on gardening, cooking, environmental stewardship, hiking and much more. For more information, visit extension.unh.edu/event/2024/07/2024-stratham-4-h-summerfest.

    • There will be a Fairytale Festival in Greeley Park (100 Concord St., Nashua) Saturday, July 20, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., with stage acts, community vendors, caricaturists, games, books and more. There will be local stage acts, a Party Palace Performance featuring your favorite fairy tale characters, and a character meet and greet. Visit nashua.gov.

    • The Canterbury Fair is celebrating its 66th year. Join the fun on Saturday, July 27, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Canterbury Center (Baptist and Center roads) with live music, demonstrations from local artisan and antique vendors, children’s activities and more. Admission is free. Visit canterburyfair.com for more information.

    • The 42nd Suncook Valley Rotary Hot Air Balloon Rally will take place from Friday, Aug. 2, through Sunday, Aug. 4, at Drake Field (17 Fayette St., Pittsfield) featuring helicopter rides, live music, midway carnival rides,and of course hot-air balloons. For a schedule of events, visit nhballoonrally.org/schedule.

    • The Great New England BBQ & Food Truck Festival returns for an eighth year to the Hampshire Dome (50 Emerson Road, Milford) on Saturday, Aug. 3, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The event will feature a crafters’ booth and a kids’ zone in addition to eats from local food trucks, along with craft beer, live music, a cornhole tournament and more. Visit gnefoodtruckfest.com.

    • The Belknap County Fair is set to return on Saturday, Aug. 3, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday, Aug. 4, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 174 Mile Hill Road in Belmont. The fair features live entertainment, food, exhibits and animal shows. Admission at the gate is $10 for adults, $5 for senior citizens 65 and older, police, fire and EMS personnel, and free for kids under 10 and for military service members. Visit bcfairnh.org.

    Hudson’s Old Home Days return Thursday, Aug. 8, to Sunday, Aug. 11, on the grounds of the Hill House (211 Derry Road, Hudson). There will be carnival games, live music, fireworks, food and more. Event times are Thursday from 5 to 10 p.m., Friday from 5 to 11 p.m., Saturday from noon to 11 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. See hudsonoldhomedays.com.

    • The Town of Windham Recreation Department will host a Food Truck Festival and Car Show on the grounds of Windham High School (64 London Bridge Road, Windham) on Sunday, Aug. 11. In addition to eats from local food trucks, there will be music and games of cornhole. For details contact the Windham Recreation office at 965-1208 or recreation@windhamnh.gov.

    • Don’t miss the 16th annual Hampton Beach Children’s Festival, Monday, Aug. 12, through Friday, Aug. 16. The event includes ice cream, dancing, balloons, storytelling, a magic show and a costume parade. All activities are free and open to the public. Visit hamptonbeach.org/events/childrens-events for details as they become available.

    • Don’t miss Londonderry’s 125th annual Old Home Days, set for Wednesday, Aug. 14, through Saturday, Aug. 17. Details are in the works; past celebrations have included concerts, fireworks, a parade, a 5K road race, a baby contest and children’s games. See londonderrynh.gov or follow the event page on Facebook @townoflondonderryoldhomeday.

    • Hillsborough’s History Alive event will be on Saturday, Aug. 17, and Sunday, Aug. 18, at Jones Road in Hillsborough. The event will focus on historical reenactments of famous battles and daily village life from times past, and will include activities, crafts and musicians. Tickets are $10 per adult and $8 for seniors. The event is free for children 16 and under when accompanied by an adult. You can purchase a bracelet on the day of the event and it will cover both days. Cash only; credit cards are not accepted in person. Visit historyalivenh.org.

    • “Mahrajan” is Arabic for having an excellent time. The Mahrajan Middle Eastern Food Festival (bestfestnh.com) will take place Friday, Aug. 16, to Sunday, Aug. 18, at Our Lady of the Cedars Church (140 Mitchell St., Manchester, 623-8944, olocnh.org). The Mahrajan was started by parishioners of Our Lady of the Cedars Melkite Church to celebrate and share the rich food and cultural traditions of Lebanon. Lebanese foods such as shawarma, falafel, lamb, grilled chicken and many types of pastries will be served. Visit the Festival’s website for updated information, closer to the date.

    • The New Hampshire Farm Museum (1305 White Mountain Highway, Milton) is hosting its annual Truck and Tractor Day on Saturday, Aug. 17, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Trucks, wagons, antique cars and tractors dating back to the mid 1900s will be on display, and the event will feature demonstrations on things like the two-man saw and the butter churn treadmill. Admission is $12 for adults, $8 for seniors 65 and older, $6 for children ages 4 to 17, and free for children under 4. A family pass is available for $30. Visit nhfarmmuseum.org.

    • The 125th Gilmanton Old Home Day is scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 17, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. outside the Smith Meeting House (Meeting House and Governor roads, Gilmanton). Details on this year’s event are still being ironed out, but previous events have included live entertainment, a puppet show, a silent auction, an antique auto parade and an art show. Visit gilmantonnh.org/organizations/gilmanton-old-home-day for details as they become available.

    • Head to Field of Dreams Community Park (48 Geremonty Drive, Salem) for the park’s annual Family Fun Day on Saturday, Aug. 24, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. A wide variety of activities is planned, including a petting farm, face-painting, bounce houses, food trucks, photo opportunities with superheroes and princesses, and more. Visit fieldofdreamsnh.org.

    Candia’s Old Home Day will return on Saturday, Aug. 24, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Moore Park (74 High St., Candia). The event starts with a parade after a firemen’s homemade breakfast. Local crafters and artisans, town community booths, games, a wildlife exhibit, food and music will also be featured. Visit candiaoldhomeday.com.

    • Assumption Greek Orthodox Church (111 Island Pond Road, Manchester, 623-2045, assumptionnh.org) will hold its 2024 Greekfest on Saturday, Aug. 24, from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Sunday, Aug. 25, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. A full range of Greek foods will be served; there will be a loukoumades booth selling deep-fried dough balls covered in honey and powdered sugar, a gyro booth, a pastry booth and a bar. Visit the Church’s website for more information closer to the event.

    • This year’s Gate City Brewfest will feature a Family Fun event on Saturday, Aug. 24, from 1 to 5 p.m. at Holman Stadium (67 Amherst St. in Nashua). There will be a home run derby, a wing eating contest, a kids’ fun zone, bounce houses, live music and a locked moose exhibit. See gatecitybrewfestnh.com/music-family-fun.

    Pembroke and Allenstown’s Old Home Day returns on Saturday, Aug. 24, starting with a parade down Main Street in Allenstown to Memorial Field (Exchange Street) in Pembroke. A fun-filled day is planned at the field, featuring two stages of live entertainment, antique cars, children’s games, a craft area, bounce houses and a fireworks display at dusk. Admission and parking are free. See “Pembroke & Allenstown Old Home Day 2024” on Facebook, or join its group page for details.

    • Don’t miss this year’s Hopkinton State Fair, a Labor Day weekend tradition happening from Thursday, Aug. 29, to Monday, Sept. 2, at the fairgrounds (392 Kearsarge Ave., Contoocook). There will be livestock shows, a demolition derby, carnival rides, monster trucks, live entertainment, food and more. The fair hours are 5 to 10 p.m. on Thursday; 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Monday. For more details and ticket prices, visit hsfair.org.

    • The Exeter UFO Festival returns to downtown Exeter on Saturday, Aug. 31, and Sunday, Sept. 1 — the event commemorates the anniversary of the “Exeter Incident” (an alleged UFO sighting on Sept. 3, 1965) by featuring in-depth talks and presentations from leading experts on UFOs, along with a variety of “intergalactic” children’s games and food, all to benefit the Exeter Area Kiwanis Club. See exeterkiwanis.com/exeter-ufo-festival.

    Arts & Museums

    SEE Science Center (200 Bedford St., Manchester) will be holding its fourth annual “Kickoff to Summer” from Saturday, June 22, to Friday, June 28. New Hampshire’s own Zach Umperovitch will build a giant Rube Goldberg machine in this weeklong celebration. The contraption will emerge over the week, with lots of test runs and tinkering, and will culminate with a final demonstration of the complete machine at the end of the week. Visitors will be able to watch Zach at work and discover techniques used to design and construct these machines, and kids will witness how trial and failure are essential parts of the engineering process, according to the website. The Kickoff to Summer celebration will also include special hands-on activities, and raffles, all included with admission. Visit see-sciencecenter.org or call 669-0400.

    • The McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center (2 Institute Drive, Concord) Science Playground is open from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. every day the Center is open, according to their website. Entry to the Science Playground is included with general admission; guests must enter and exit the playground through the building. A member of the Discovery Center Education staff will be present with an educational activity or demo and to monitor safety on the playground but a parent or guardian must still be present with children on the playground. Visit starhop.com or call 271-7827. The Center’s planetarium shows, each running around 25 to 45 minutes, play on the hour from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and are an add-on to any general admission ticket. Film topics include a scientist hamster who builds a rocket ship, life on Mars, and the night sky. Shows are rated for those 4, 5 or 6 years or older, depending on the film, and ticket sales stop 10 minutes before each screening.

    • The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester) offers a free drop-in Creative Studio on the second Saturday of every month from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. for children and families, according to their website. Reservations are not necessary for this program, and free short family tours will also be available. Admission to the museum from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. is free for New Hampshire residents on the second Saturday of the month.

    The Currier will hold its annual Block Party on Sunday, July 14, from 4 to 8 p.m. The evening will feature art activities, live music, free gallery admission, food trucks, face painting, a beer and wine tent, a community art project and more, according to the website.

    The Currier will also be hosting two sessions of their in-person three-day Mini Matisse Workshops for Kids. This workshop is intended for children of kindergarten age, according to their website. Led by instructor Larissa Barazova, students will enjoy a fun variety of methods and materials and explore the museum with guided gallery activities. The first session runs Wednesday, July 17, to Friday, July 19, and the second session is Wednesday, Aug. 7, to Friday, Aug. 9, from 10 a.m. to noon each day. Registration is $150 for non-members, $135 for members; tuition discounts are available. Visit currier.org.

    Soft-front baby carriers are allowed everywhere in the museum and strollers are typically allowed although restrictions may apply during times of heavy attendance, according to the website. The museum also provides strollers on a first come, first served basis, according to the same website. Toddler cups are not allowed in the galleries but are allowed in the Winter Garden Cafe and main lobby.

    • The American Independence Museum (1 Governors Lane, Exeter, 772-2622, independencemuseum.org) is a place for people of all ages to learn about America’s revolutionary history. It provides access to historic buildings and interactive, historically accurate depictions of what life was like during the American Revolution. Guided and self-guided museum tours are offered Thursday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission costs range from $5 to $14. Tickets are free for children 12 and under, active or retired military veterans, first responders and museum members.

    • The Aviation Museum of New Hampshire (27 Navigator Road, Londonderry, 669-4820, aviationmuseumofnh.org) is dedicated to the science, technology, history and culture of aviation and features interactive exhibits and educational programs. It is open Friday and Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday, from 1 to 4 p.m. and is open to appointments or private group tours as well. Admission costs $10 for adults, $5 for seniors age 65 and over, veterans, active duty and kids ages 6 through 12, and is free for kids age 5 and under, with a $30 maximum for families.

    • The Children’s Museum of New Hampshire (6 Washington St., Dover, 742- 2002, childrens-museum.org) is a family museum featuring unique interactive exhibits with a focus on art, science and culture. Summer hours are Tuesday through Sunday, from 9 a.m. to noon, with an additional session from 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday. Tickets are available for either the morning (9 a.m. to noon) or afternoon (1 to 4 p.m.) sessions and cost $12.50 for adults and children over age 1 and $10.50 for seniors over age 65. Participants must register online and the Museum asks that patrons leave strollers at home or be prepared to park them in the coat room; patrons may bring baby carriers or can borrow one from the museum, according to the website.

    Mariposa Museum & World Culture Center (26 Main St., Peterborough, 924-4555, mariposamuseum.org) is a museum of art and artifacts from around the world that includes hands-on exhibits with costumes, puppets, instruments and more for children to explore. It’s open Wednesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission costs $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and $6 for kids ages 3 through 16 but is free for members.

    • Learn about New Hampshire marine life and science with live animals, hands-on exhibits and educational programs at the Seacoast Science Center (Odiorne Point State Park, 570 Ocean Blvd., Rye, 436-8043, seacoastsciencecenter.org). Summer hours are Tuesdays through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and those run until Monday, Oct. 14. General admission costs $12 for ages 12 and up, $8 for ages 3 to 11, and $10 for seniors age 65 and up and military with a valid ID, active duty or veteran. Children under age 3 are free. The Center recommends that attendees book ahead, since availability may be limited.

    • The Millyard Museum (200 Bedford St., Manchester) is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (closed Thursday, July 4). For those interested in all things Manchester and history, this is the place. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and college students, $5 for children between the ages of 12 to 18, and free for children under 12; Manchester Historic Association members are admitted at no charge. The Museum has two fun games that can be printed off or picked up at the museum: the Millyard Museum Fun Book, which has word searches, drawing, and more, and Mystery Objects, which is an I Spy-type scavenger hunt. Visit manchesterhistoric.org.

    • There may be no better place for New Hampshire history than the New Hampshire Historical Society (30 Park St., Concord), which has extensive exhibits, the de facto presidential library for Franklin Pierce, and a collection of more than 35,000 objects related to New Hampshire, like the esoteric Mystery Stone. The NHHS also operates “Moose on the Loose,” a social studies curriculum for the State of New Hampshire that explores the Granite State’s history, economics, geography and civic life, introducing students to the state’s rich cultural heritage, according to their website. They are open Tuesday through Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit nhhistory.org.

    The New Hampshire Telephone Museum (1 Depot St., Warner) features nearly 1,000 telephones, switchboards and other telecommunication memorabilia and history and has an interactive kids’ room. They also have programming outside of telephones; check their website for upcoming events. Summer hours are Tuesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission costs $9 for adults, $7 for seniors age 65 and up and $6 for students in grades K through 12. There is a guided tour available for an additional $3 per admission ticket, except for kids in grades K through 12. Visit nhtelephonemuseum.com.

    Live Performances

    Henniker’s Summer Concert Series brings the music on Tuesday nights from 6 to 8 p.m. until Sept. 3 in Community Park (57 Main St., Henniker). Concerts are free to the public, though donations are welcome, and each week has a new food vendor on site. The next concert, on June 25, will be Rumboat Chili. Visit facebook.com/HennikerConcert for the full summer lineup.

    Greeley Park (100 Concord St., Nashua) hosts free summer concerts each Tuesday at 7 p.m. until Aug. 20. The next concert, on June 25, is Tru Diamond, a Neil Diamond tribute act. Visit nashuanh.gov.

    New Boston Concerts on the Common take place on the New Boston Town Common (5 Meetinghouse Hill Road, New Boston) on select Tuesdays throughout the summer: June 25, July 9, July 23, Aug. 6, and Aug. 20. Concerts begin at 6 p.m. Bring a blanket or chair. The Rail Trail Grill concession stand will benefit the New Boston Rail Trail and will feature hot dogs, hamburgers, soft drinks and snacks. The first concert, June 25, will be by the Bedford Big Band, whose repertoire favors well-known jazz standards and more modern pop, funk and Latin selections. Visit newbostonnh.gov.

    • The Londonderry Arts Council presents free concerts each Wednesday at 7 p.m. on the Londonderry Town Common (265 Mammoth Road) until Aug. 14. The next concert, on June 26, will be Brian Templeton and the Delta Generators. Visit londonderryartscouncil.org/cotc-schedule.

    • Join the Merrimack Parks & Recreation Department for a free weekly summer concert series Wednesday nights at 6 p.m. at Abbie Griffin Park (6 Baboosic Lake Road, Merrimack). Each week features a different musical style. Bring blankets or lawn chairs and your dinner to enjoy a free night of entertainment; Franklin Savings Bank will give out free popcorn during the show. The next concert, on June 26, will be by children’s performers Ben Rudnick and Friends. Visit merrimackparksandrec.org/summmer-concert-series.

    • Summer concerts take place on the Pelham Village Green in front of the Pelham Public Library (24 Village Green, Pelham) on certain Wednesdays throughout the summer: June 26, July 10, July 24, Aug. 7, and Aug. 21. Concerts begin at 6 p.m. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. No dogs or alcohol allowed on the Village Green. The first concert, on June 26, will be by the All Day Fire Band. Visit pelhamweb.com.

    • The Impact Touring Children’s Theatre will perform The Emperor’s New Clothes on Tuesday, July 2, at 10 a.m. at the BNH Stage (16 S Main St., Concord, 225-1111, ccanh.com). Emperor Thelonious loves nothing more than his collection of clothing, made of the most expensive and rarest cloths from around the world; when a mysterious peddler comes to town with a magic fabric that appears invisible to those unworthy, the emperor learns an important lesson in humility. This is a free performance. Seating for this show is mostly on the open floor. Patrons are encouraged to bring blankets to sit on.

    • The 2024 Bank of New Hampshire Children’s Summer Series kicks off at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St. in Manchester; palacetheatre.org) on Tuesday, July 2, and Wednesday, July 3, with a performance “Music with Miss Alli.” Shows are at 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. both days. In the weeks after, shows run Tuesday through Thursday at 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. and Friday at 10 a.m. The show schedule includes: Madagascar Jr.July 9 to 12;Roald Dahl’s Willy Wonka Jr. July 16 to 19;The Wizard of Oz Youth EditionJuly 23 to July 26; Disney’s Moana Jr.July 30 to Aug. 2;Disney’s Finding Nemo Jr. Aug. 6 to 9; Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Jr.Aug13 to 16, and Disney’s Little Mermaid Jr. Aug. 20 to 23, according to the theater’s website. Tickets to each show cost $10 per person.

    Kidz Bop Live comes to the BankNH Pavilion (80 Recycle Way, Gilford, 293-4700, banknhpavilion.com) on Wednesday, July 3, at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $49.

    • Join Alice as she tries to make sense of her crazy adventure when The Palace Youth Theater Summer Camp presents Alice in Wonderland, Jr., Friday, July 5, at 7 p.m. and Saturday, July 6, at 11 a.m. at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St. Manchester, 668-5588, palacetheatre.org). The student actors are in grades 2 through 12. Tickets start at $12.

    • See Mean Girls (High School Version) on Friday, July 5, and Saturday, July 6, at 7 p.m. at the Chubb Theatre (44 S. Main St., Concord, 225-1111, ccanh.com). Music Theatre International rates this show PG-13. Parental discretion is advised. Although the show is presented as a “School Edition,” some content may not be appropriate for school-aged audiences. Tickets are $18.75 for adults, $15.75 for students and seniors.

    • Camp Encore! presents Shrek, The Musical, Jr. on Saturday, July 6, at 11 a.m. in Prescott Park (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth), as part of the Prescott Park Arts Festival (prescottpark.org). At Camp Encore!, performers, artists and aspiring technicians ages 7 to 17 come together to gain teamwork skills and experience theater arts; Shrek, The Musical Jr. is the culmination of this session. Tickets start at $5 and reservations can be made at portsmouthnhtickets.com.

    • The Impact Touring Children’s Theatre presents Return to Oz on Tuesday, July 9, at 10 a.m. at the BNH Stage (16 S Main St., Concord, 225-1111, ccanh.com): Dorothy returns to the magic land in hopes of finding her friends once again, but somehow the Emerald City has lost its sparkle and a new witch is in town, ready to rumble. This is a free performance. Seating for this show is mostly on the open floor. Patrons are encouraged to bring blankets to sit on.

    • Many, many puppies face a great adventure in The Palace Youth Theater Summer Camp’s presentation of 101 Dalmatians Kids, Friday July 12, at 7 p.m., at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester, 668-5588, palacetheatre.org). The student actors are in grades 2 through 12. Tickets start at $12.

    • Follow magical chocolatier Willy Wonka as he sets up his candy empire and looks for an heir to turn it over to in Willy Wonka Jr. on Friday, July 12, and Saturday, July 13, at 7 p.m. at the Chubb Theatre (44 S. Main St., Concord, 225-1111, ccanh.com). Tickets are $18.75 for adults, $15.75 for students and seniors.

    • Watch the adventures of father and son clownfish Marlin and Nemo as they struggle to be reunited in Finding Nemo (Kids) on Saturday, July 13, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. at the Chubb Theatre (44 S. Main St., Concord, 225-1111, ccanh.com). Tickets are $13.75 for adults, $10.75 for students and seniors.

    • Join Ariel, a young mermaid princess, as she struggles to learn whether her heart belongs on land or under the sea in The Little Mermaid Jr., Friday, July 19, and Saturday, July 20, at 7 p.m. at the Chubb Theatre (44 S. Main St., Concord, 225-1111, ccanh.com). Tickets are $18.75 for adults, $15.75 for students and seniors.

    • In collaboration with Leach Library, the Londonderry Arts Council Concerts on the Common series (Londonderry Town Common, 265 Mammoth Road, Londonderry) presents The Mr. Aaron Band in a concert for kids on Saturday, July 20, at 1:30 p.m. Visitmraaronmusic.com. In the event of bad weather, the event will take place in the Londonderry High School Cafeteria (295 Mammoth Road).

    • Camp Encore! will stage a performance of Mary Poppins Jr. Saturday, July 20, and Sunday, July 21, at 11 a.m. at the Wilcox Main Stage in Prescott Park (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth). Tickets start at $5 and reservations can be made at portsmouthnhtickets.com.

    • The Franklin Opera House (316 Central St., Franklin, 934-1901, franklinoperahouse.org) will present a series of free concerts on Thursday evenings throughout the summer at 5 p.m. The first, on Thursday, July 11, will be the band Miles From Memphis. Bring a chair or blanket. In case of rain, the concerts will be postponed or canceled.

    • An amateur brother-and-sister team of explorers have come across a lot of unusual things in their young lives, but nothing compares to a house made entirely out of candy, in The Impact Touring Children’s Theatre’s performance of Hansel and Gretel on Tuesday, July 23, at 10 a.m. at the BNH Stage (16 S Main St., Concord, 225-1111, ccanh.com). This is a free performance. Seating for this show is mostly on the open floor. Patrons are encouraged to bring blankets to sit on.

    • The Palace Youth Theater Summer Camp presents Newsies, Jr. on Friday, July 26, at 7 p.m. and Saturday, July 27, at 11 a.m. at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester, 668-5588, palacetheatre.org). The student actors are in grades 2 through 12. Tickets start at $12.

    • Catch Rock of Ages, Youth Edition on Friday, July 26, and Saturday, July 27, at 7 p.m. at the Chubb Theatre (44 S. Main St., Concord, 225-1111, ccanh.com). Set on L.A.’s famous Sunset Strip in 1987, Rock of Ages tells the story of Drew, a city boy from South Detroit, and Sherrie, a small-town girl, who have both traveled to L.A. to chase their dreams of making it big and falling in love. Tickets are $18.75 for adults, $15.75 for students and seniors.

    • The Palace Youth Theater Summer Camp presents Jungle Book, Kids, Friday, Aug. 2, at 7 p.m. at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester, 668-5588, palacetheatre.org). The student actors are in grades 2 through 12. Tickets start at $12.

    • Camp Encore! presents Descendants, the Musical Saturday, Aug. 3, and Sunday, Aug. 4, at 1 p.m. at the Wilcox Main Stage in Prescott Park (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth). Based on the popular Disney Channel Original Movies, Disney’s Descendants: The Musical is a brand-new musical with comedy, adventure, Disney characters and hit songs from the films. Tickets start at $5; reservations can be made at portsmouthnhtickets.com.

    • High in a tower, surprises await as a fair maiden longs for a friend, an old crone longs for an understanding daughter, and a seagull longs for some crackers in the Impact Touring Children’s Theatre’s performance of Rapunzel on Tuesday, Aug. 6, at 10 a.m. at the BNH Stage (16 S Main St., Concord, 225-1111, ccanh.com). Will a passerby be able to spy the strange structure, figure out how to reach its top, and solve everyone’s problems? Only time and magic will tell as truth and honesty are tested. This is a free performance. Seating for this show is mostly on the open floor. Patrons are encouraged to bring blankets to sit on.

    • The Palace Youth Theatre Summer Camp presents Wizard of Oz, Youth Edition on Friday Aug. 16, at 7 p.m. and Saturday, Aug. 17, at 11 a.m. at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester, 668-5588, palacetheatre.org). The student actors are in grades 2 through 12. Tickets start at $12.

    • The Palace Youth Theatre Summer Camp presents Willy Wonka Kids on Saturday, Aug. 24, at noon at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester, 668-5588, palacetheatre.org). The student actors are in grades 2 through 12. Tickets start at $12.

    Outdoor fun

    City swimming

    Concord’s six outdoor pools will open in late June. The City’s website says to stay tuned and check their Facebook page (facebook.com/ConcordParknRecDept) for exact opening dates and times. The pools are free for residents but they will need to show proof of residency, according to the website. Passes can only be purchased at the City-Wide Community Center, 14 Canterbury Road. Non-resident passes cannot be purchased at the pools or splash pad. A season pass is $125 per family and a 48-hour pass is $20 per family, and residents may bring a guest to the pool, so a resident family of four coming to a pool can bring up to four guests at no charge, according to their website. The pools are Rollins Pool (33 Bow St.), Keach Pool (2 Newton Ave.), Merrill Pool (27 Eastman St.), Kimball Pool (171 N. State St.), Rolfe Pool (79 Community Drive, Penacook) and Garrison Pool (31 Hutchins St.). The White Park Splash Pad (1 White St.) is now open weekends only, and updates to times will be posted on their Facebook page as well. Visit concordnh.gov/1269/Community-Pools.

    Manchester City Parks and Recreation has announced its aquatic facility schedule: Livingston Pool is open for lap swim from noon to 1 p.m. and public swim from 2 to 7 p.m.; Raco-Theodore Pool opens on Monday, June 24, and has public swim from 2 to 7 p.m., but check their website for swim meet closures; Crystal Lake is open for swimming every day of the week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m; Dupont and the Sheehan-Basquil Splash Pads are open every day of the week from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. The website also states that all facilities are subject to closure or hour changes due to weather or low staffing and the pool facilities operate at a 25:1 bather-to-lifeguard ratio. Visit manchesternh.gov.

    • The City of Nashua Parks and Recreation departmenthas announced its swimming pool schedule. Sites include Centennial Pool (next to Holman Stadium on Sargents Avenue); Crown Hill Pool (next to Girls Inc. on Burke Street); Rotary Pool and Wading Pool (next to Fairgrounds Elementary School on Cleveland Street), and Greeley Park Wading Pool (in Greeley Park on Concord Street), which is only for small children accompanied by an adult, according to the website. All the pools follow the same schedule. On Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to noon there are swimming lessons; general swim is from 1 to 5 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m., according to the website. Saturday has general swim from 1 to 5 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. and Sunday has general swim from 1 to 6 p.m. Visit nashuanh.gov.

    State parks

    Day-use fees for most state parks: ages 12 or older, $4 to $5 depending on the park; ages 6 to 11 $2; free for those age 5 and younger and New Hampshire residents 65 or older with a valid NH license. Visit nhstateparks.org.

    Pawtuckaway State Park 128 Mountain Road, Nottingham, 895-3031. This park is always open for recreation unless closed or restricted by posting, according to the website.

    Bear Brook State Park 61 Deerfield Road, Allenstown, 485-9869. A majority of Bear Brook’s trails are impassable by bicycle or horse due to downed trees, but cleanup is currently underway, according to the website. The CCC Museum is open for normal operating hours on Saturdays from noon to 4 p.m. and Sundays from 10 a.m to noon, but outside these hours visitors can call 485-9869 to schedule an appointment. The fee is $2 for ages 12 to 17.

    Odiorne Point 570 Ocean Blvd., Rye, 436-7406. When the park is unstaffed during the season, deposit payment in the self-serve paystation or at the Seacoast Science Center main desk. The Seacoast Science Center is currently open Tuesdays through Sundays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., but that is an additional fee that is not included with the State Park admission fee.

    Wellington State Park 614 W. Shore Road, Bristol, 744-2197. When the park is unstaffed during the season, deposit payment in the self-serve paystation.

    Hampton Beach 160 Ocean Blvd., Hampton, 227-8722. Metered parking 8 a.m. to midnight; Haverhill Street Bathhouse open 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Marine Memorial Bathhouse (A Street) open year-round 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.; North Beach Bathhouse (High Street) open year-round, 8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.; Seashell Bathhouse (beach side) open from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; South Pavilion Bathhouse (F Street) open year-round 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., according to the website.

    Clough State Park 455 Clough Park Road, Weare, 529-7112. This park is always open for recreation unless closed or restricted by posting, according to their website.

    Robert Frost Farm Historic Site 122 Rockingham Road, Derry, 432-3091. The house is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday through Monday, with the last tour starting at 4 p.m., through Oct. 14, according to robertfrostfarm.org, while the grounds and trails around the house and barn are open from dusk to dawn all year.

    Lakes

    Lake Massabesic off Londonderry Turnpike in Manchester, manchesternh.gov, 642-6482

    Pawtuckaway Lake Pawtuckaway State Park, 7 Pawtuckaway Road, Nottingham, 895-3031, nhstateparks.org

    Newfound Lake Wellington State Park, 614 W. Shore Road, Bristol, 744–2197, nhstateparks.org

    Lake Winnipesaukee in Belknap and Carroll counties intheLakes Region, lakewinnipesaukee.net, which says it is the largest lake in New Hampshire

    Squam Lake in Grafton, Carroll and Belknap counties, lakesregion.org/squam-lake

    Attractions

    Andres Institute of Art (106 Route 13, Brookline) has a network of trails decorated with various sculptures and other artwork, and holds various events.

    Bedrock Gardens (19 High Road, Lee) is a 30-acre public garden that integrates unusual botanical specimens and unique sculpture into an inspiring landscape journey, with fun programming fun for the whole family, according to their website. It is open Tuesday through Friday and the first and third weekends of the month from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., according to the website. Visit bedrockgardens.org

    Canobie Lake Park (85 N. Policy St., Salem) amusement park is open daily. Their hours are generally Friday and Saturday from 10:30 a.m to 10:30 p.m.; Monday through Thursday from 10:30 a.m to 7 p.m., and Sundays from 10:30 a.m to 7 p.m. Starting Sunday, July 7, it will be open until 9 p.m. on Sundays, and Castaway Island is open daily as well from 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday, July 3, and Thursday, July 4, will operate on Saturday hours. Check canobie.com for specific hours and ticket prices.

    Charmingfare Farm (774 High St. in Candia, 483-5623, visitthefarm.com) is a working farm with wildlife exhibits featuring animals such as black bears, coyote and more. Charmingfare is currently open Thursdays through Sundays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with special events and exhibits such as “Creatures of the Night: Nocturnal Animals in Daytime” on Thursday, June 20, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. and “Scouting for Bigfoot” on Saturday, June 22 and Sunday, June 23.

    Special events

    • View sculptures crafted on Hampton Beach at the 24th annual Hampton Beach Master Sand Sculpting Classic, happening Thursday, June 20, through Saturday, June 22, at Hampton Beach (180 Ocean Blvd.). The event includes award ceremonies and prizes for the greatest sand sculptures built with the theme “Sand Wars – May the Beach Be With You” in mind. The competition is by invitation only, but the sculptures will be illuminated for viewing at night until June 26. Visit hamptonbeach.org.

    • Squam Lakes Natural Science Center will be hosting their StoryWalk Kickoff Reception at the Curry Place (846 Route 3, Holderness) on Friday, June 28, at 10 a.m. Attendees can stroll along the Squam channel as they read a nature-inspired story posted one page at a time along the trail. Children can participate in a craft and enjoy a snack connected to the story at the reception, according to the website. It’s free and there’s no registration required. Visit nhnature.org. The Center’s live animal exhibit trail and hiking trails are open every day from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., with the last trail admission at 3:30 p.m., according to the website.

    • Prescott Farm Environmental Education Center (928 White Oaks Road, Laconia, prescottfarm.org) will host an all-ages workshop, “Tractor Tour: Life in the Fields, on Saturday, July 6, at 10 a.m., where participants can watch for hawks and songbirds soaring overhead and learn how animals such as deer, bears, songbirds and turkeys depend on open fields for food and shelter, according to their website. Free for members, $15 for nonmembers.

    • Pumpkin Blossom Farm (393 Pumpkin Hill Road, Warner) hosts Lavender U-Pick in its lavender fields on various dates between Friday, July 5, and Sunday, July 25, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Everyone is invited to wander the fields and cut and harvest bundles of lavender. Attendees are welcome to relax and have a picnic on the lawn, walk the shaded trail and visit the baby chicks. Lavender plants, products and treats will also be for sale. Discount bundles are $18 during the weekdays and $20 on weekends. Visit pumpkinblossomfarm.com.

    • Prescott Farm Environmental Education Center (928 White Oaks Road, Laconia, prescottfarm.org) will hold four different Summer Polliwog programs for kids on different Wednesdays in July at 10 a.m. The first is Mudtastic and involves a mud run on July 10 for $12 per adult-and-child pair; the next is Glorious Bugs, where participants will make homes for bugs, on July 17; the third is Water Up! Water Down! Water all Around! where participants will learn about the water cycle, on July 24, and the last one, on July 31, is Acorn Was a Little Wild, which involves a puppet named Stasher and a hunt for deciduous trees. These last three are $15 for an adult and child pair.

    • The second annual Capital Area New Hampshire Butterfly Survey will take place on Saturday, July 27, from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at NH Audubon’s McLane Center (84 Silk Farm Road, Concord) and will help gather long-term butterfly data to better understand the changing ranges of butterfly species over time and support statewide butterfly conservation efforts. Visit nhaudubon.org.

    • The 2024 Sunflower Festival at Coppal House Farm (118 North River Road in Lee; nhsunflower.com) takes place Saturday, July 27, through Sunday, Aug. 4, 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. (plus a special sunrise session on July 28). See the website for admission prices. See the blooming fields and then enjoy live music, an artisan craft fair, food and more.

    • Head to Prescott Farm Environmental Education Center (928 White Oaks Road, Laconia,prescottfarm.org) for Fireflies Light Up the Sky on Saturday, July 27, from 7 to 8 p.m. to learn about fireflies and to experience them in action. This is for ages 12 and older. The cost is $15 for nonmembers.

    • Prescott Farm Environmental Education Center (928 White Oaks Road, Laconia, prescottfarm.org) presents a tasty and educational program, “Homemade Dairy and Non-dairy Ice Cream, on Saturday, Aug. 3, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Learn about how to make ice cream. This program is open to youth and adults. The cost is $15 for members and $30 for nonmembers.

    • The Sunflower Bloom Festival at fields in Concord will run Saturday, Aug. 10, through Sunday, Aug. 18, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekends and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on weekdays, according to sunfoxfarm.org. The festival will feature live music, food vendors and more. Admission costs $10, kids 10 and under get in free; cut your own flowers for $2 per stem.

    Sports

    • The New England Revolution II professional soccer club will play their home games at Mark A. Ouellette Stadium (Victory Lane in Hooksett) on Sunday, June 23, at 6 p.m.; Saturday, July 6, at 7 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 8, at 4 p.m., and Sunday, Oct. 6, at 1 p.m. Tickets start at $12. Visit revolutionsoccer.net/revolutionii.

    • The six-time champion Nashua Silver Knights, members of the Futures Collegiate Baseball League, will be playing all summer, with their last home game on Friday, Aug. 2, at 6 p.m., when they will take on the New Britain Bees, before the playoffs begin later that week. Visit nashuasilverknights.com.

    • The New Hampshire Fisher Cats, the Double-A minor-league affiliate of the Toronto Blue Jays, will be playing all summer. They will have fireworks from Thursday, July 4, through Saturday, July 7, after games against the Portland Sea Dogs. Star Wars Night strikes back on Saturday, July 13. On Saturday, Aug. 10, the Fisher Cats will celebrate all things ’90s with the first 1,000 fans through the gates receiving a clear fanny pack and Beanie Babies getting in free. On Saturday, Aug. 24, the team celebrates New Hampshire hockey; the first 1,000 fans through the gates will receive a Monarchs-vs.-Fisher Cats bobblehead. On Sunday, Aug. 25, a Piggy Tea Party Brunch will be held before the 1:35 p.m. game. The final home game is slated for Sunday, Sept. 8, against the Portland Sea Dogs. Visit nhfishercats.com.

    • It’s NASCAR Weekend at New Hampshire Motor Speedway (1122 Route 106, Loudon) Saturday, June 22, and Sunday, June 23. This includes the SciAps 200 NASCAR Xfinity Series race & Mohegan Sun 100 NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour race on Saturday and the NASCAR Cup Series race on Sunday. Tickets vary in price, depending on the race. See nhms.com.

    • Dozens of high school football players from across the state will participate in the 12th annual CHaD NH East-West High School All-Star Football Game, scheduled for Friday, June 28, at 6 p.m. at the Grappone Stadium at Saint Anselm College (100 St. Anselm Drive, Manchester). General admission tickets are $15, with all proceeds benefiting Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock (CHaD). Visit chadkids.org.

    NH Roller Derby (nhrollerderby.com) has double-headers scheduled for Saturday, June 29, and Saturday, July 27, at JFK Coliseum in Manchester.

    Granite State Roller Derby (granitestaterollerderby.org) has home bouts scheduled for Saturday, June 29, and Saturday, July 20, at 6:30 p.m. at the Everett Arena (15 Loudon Road, Concord).

    At the movies

    • The Milford Drive-In Theater (531 Elm St., Milford) has two screens for movie screenings Wednesday through Sunday. Movies start at 8:45 p.m. with the box office opening at 7:15 p.m. but opening at 6:45 p.m. on Friday and Saturday nights, according to their website. Each screen shows two movies and the first film for each screen is typically a family-friendly or kid movie. Movie-goers can listen to the film on their car radio or on a portable radio and patrons can sit in lawn chairs in front of their vehicle. They have a fully stocked concessions stand where attendees can even purchase a portable radio if needed. Tickets are $33 per car (up to six people) and $6 for each additional person. Tickets can be purchased online. Visit milforddrivein.com or call 660-6711.

    Movies in the Park will take place in Riverfront Park in Tilton, hosted by the Hall Memorial Library (hallmemoriallibrary.org), throughout the summer, with the park opening at 6 p.m. and the movie starting at 8 p.m. Movies are slated for Friday, June 21; Friday, July 26; Friday, Aug. 23 and Friday, Sept. 27. The June 21 film is Wish (PG, 2023).

    O’neil Cinemas Brickyard Square (24 Calef Highway, Epping, oneilcinemas.com) will run a kids series starting Monday, June 24, with shows on Mondays and Wednesdays at 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. The schedule features Migration (PG, 2023) on June 24 and June 26; Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Mutant Mayhem (PG, 2023) on July 1 and July 3; Spider-man: Across the Spider-verse (PG, 2023) on July 8 and July 10; Jumanji: The Next Level (PG-13, 2019) on July 15 and July 17; Wonka (PG, 2023) on July 22 and July 24; Trolls Band Together (PG, 2023) July 29 and July 31; Ruby Gillman, Teenage Kraken (PG, 2023) Aug. 5 and Aug. 7, and Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation (PG, 2018) Aug. 12 and Aug. 14.

    Chunky’s Cinemas (707 Huse Road, Manchester) will be hosting “Little Lunch Dates” and “Sensory-Friendly Showings” throughout the summer. A Little Lunch Date screening ofThe Super Mario Bros. Movie (PG, 2023) occurs on Tuesday, June 25, at 11:30 a.m and a similar screening of Shark Tale (PG, 2004) will occur on Tuesday, July 9, at 11:30 a.m. A Sensory-Friendly Showing of The Garfield Movie (PG, 2024) will occur on Wednesday, June 26, at 12:30 p.m. and a similar screening of Despicable Me 4 (PG, 2024) will occur on Wednesday, July 10, at 12:30 p.m. Tickets are $5 plus online fees (and come with a $5 food voucher) for the Little Lunch Dates and $6.99 plus online fees for the Sensory-Friendly Showings. Visit chunkys.com or call 206-3888.

    Cinemark Rockingham Park (15 Mall Road, Salem, cinemark.com) will screen kid-friendly films on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. The upcoming schedule includes Shrek (PG, 2001) on June 26; Paw Patrol: The Mighty Movie (PG, 2023) on July 3; The Lego Movie (PG, 2014) on July 10; Trolls Band Together(PG, 2023) on July 17; How To Train Your Dragon (PG, 2010) on July 24; Migration (PG, 2023) on July 31; Hotel Transylvania(PG, 2012) on Aug. 7, and Paddington 2 (PG, 2017) on Aug. 14.

    Downtown Summer Series Movie Nights will feature screenings in Veterans Park (723 Elm St. in Manchester), with movies beginning at dusk. Concessions will be available for purchase. The schedule features Shrek (PG, 2001) on Wednesday, June 26; Honey, I Shrunk the Kids (PG, 1989) on Wednesday, July 17; Monsters, Inc. (G, 2001) on Wednesday, July 31, and School of Rock (PG-13) on Wednesday, Aug. 14, according to a post on the Manchester Economic Development Office Facebook page.

    The Park Theatre in Jaffrey will hold its Kids Summer Movie-Rama with showings of six different movies throughout the summer on Tuesdays and Saturdays; all of the films are rated PG, according to their website. Tickets are $7 and a six-ticket bundle is $36. The schedule is as follows: Lyle, Lyle Crocodile (2022) on Saturday, June 22, at 10 a.m.; Peter Rabbit (2018) on Tuesday, June 25, at 1:30 p.m. and Saturday, June 29, at 10 a.m.; Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation (2018) on Tuesday, July 2, at 1:30 p.m. and Saturday, July 6, at 10 a.m.; The Angry Birds Movie 2 (2019) on Tuesday, July 9, at 1:30 p.m. and Saturday, July 13, at 10 a.m.; Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs (2009) on Tuesday, July 16, at 1:30 p.m. and Saturday, July 20, at 10 a.m.; The Smurfs (2011) on Tuesday, July 23, at 1:30 p.m. and Saturday, July 27, at 10 a.m. Visit theparktheatre.org/kids or call 532-8888.

    Prescott Park Arts Festival Movie Nights in Prescott Park in Portsmouth will feature a mix of classics, newer movies and family films with a suggested donation of $5 per person and an 8:30 p.m. start time. Concessions will be for sale. Family friendly films on the schedule include Frozen Sing Along(PG, 2013) on Monday, July 8; Wish (PG, 2023) on Monday, Aug. 12; E.T. The Extra Terrestrial (1982) on Thursday, Aug. 22, and Wonka (PG, 2023) on Thursday, Aug. 29.

    Movie Night Mondays On the Beach at Hampton Beach will feature screenings on Mondays at dusk on the large screen next to the playground weather permitting (rain date is Tuesdays). Admission is free. The schedule is Under the Boardwalk (PG, 2023) on July 8; The Swan Princess: Far Longer Than Forever (PG, 2023) on July 15; Migration (PG, 2023) on July 22; Mummies (PG, 2023) on July 29; Ruby Gillman, Teenage Kraken (PG, 2023) on Aug. 5; Kung Fu Panda 4 (PG, 2024) on Aug. 12, Mavka: The Forest Song (PG, 2023) on Aug. 19, and Wish (PG, 2023) on Aug. 26. See hamptonbeach.org/events/movies for approximate dusk times and updates.

    • Apple Cinemas in Hooksett and Merrimack and O’Neil Cinemas in Epping will be participating in Ghibli Fest 2024 with select showings of subtitled and English dubbed Studio Ghibli animated films starting with Princess Mononoke (PG-13, 1997) on Saturday, July 13, and Sunday, July 14; Ponyo (G, 2008) on Saturday, Aug. 3, and Sunday, Aug. 4; Whisper of the Heart (G, 1995) on Sunday, Aug. 25, and Tuesday, Aug. 27; and The Cat Returns (G, 2002) on Monday, Aug. 26, and Wednesday, Aug. 28, according to their website. Most films appear to screen at either 3 or 7 p.m., depending on the day, and this pattern goes until December and will include other Studio Ghibli films like Kiki’s Delivery Service (G, 1989) and My Neighbor Totoro (G, 1988), among others, according to their website. Ticket presales are open; specific showtimes can be found online and are subject to change. Visit tickets.applecinemas.com or oneilcinemas.com or fathomevents.com to find other theaters screening these films.

    Fathom Events has other kid-friendly movies on its schedule (see fathomevents.com for local theaters screening these movies and movie times): The Neverending Story (PG, 1984) on July 21 and July 22, and Coraline (PG, 2009) Aug. 15 through Aug. 22.

    • The Nashua SummerFun program has a “Pic in the Park” scheduled for Friday, Aug. 2, at dusk when The Marvels (PG-13, 2023) will screen at the Greeley Park Bandshell (100 Concord St., Nashua). See nashuanh.gov.

    Libraries

    Many area libraries offer storytimes, sometimes geared toward specific ages, often weekly throughout the summer. See specific libraries for registration information. Here are some of the stand-out events this summer at area libraries.

    Allenstown: Allenstown Public Library (59 Main St., Allenstown, 485-7651, allenstownlibrary.org) has passes to Squam Lakes Natural Science Center. The library membership pass is valid for up to four tickets at the member rate of $13 per ticket (half off the regular price) for Allenstown Public Library patrons per day during the 2024 trail season (May 1 to Nov. 1). The Summer Reading Program runs from June 24 to Aug. 8.

    Amherst: The Amherst Town Library (14 Main St., Amherst, 673-2288, amherstlibrary.org) summer reading program for children, teens, and adults started Monday, June 17, and will continue until Friday, Aug. 9. Participants can earn raffle tickets and “Book Bucks” to purchase books. Other activities include a Mike Bent Magic Show on Monday, June 24, a Science Heroes treasure-hunting adventure on Wednesday, July 24, and a Teens vs. Adults Trivia Night on Tuesday, July 30.

    Auburn: Griffin Free Public Library’s (22 Hooksett Road, Auburn, 483-5374, griffinfree.org) summer reading program began on Tuesday, June 18. Participants earn prizes for reading books and completing challenges. In addition, the Library will host classes in necklace making on June 20, toy binocular making on Thursday, June 27, and other craft projects. There will be a Try-It Night!: Foodie Edition on Tuesday, June 25, where children can try challenging new foods, and a tie-dye class on Tuesday, July 9.

    Bedford: Bedford Public Library’s (3 Meetinghouse Road, Bedford, 472-2300, bedfordnhlibrary.org) summer reading program is themed around the state of New Hampshire. Additionally, there will be a Junior Librarian program; a family trivia night on Monday, June 24; a fiber arts club on Wednesdays, and Wildlife Encounters on Monday, July 15.

    Boscawen: In addition to Boscawen Public Library’s (116 N. Main St., Boscawen, 753-8576, boscawenpubliclibrary.org) summer reading program, which begins Monday, June 24, the Library will feature activities including preschool story times on Wednesdays, Legos on Saturdays, and a free concert with Mr. Aaron on July 15.

    Bow: Summer activities for children at Baker Free Library (509 South St., Bow, 224-7113, bowbakerfreelibrary.org) will include summer story time on Tuesdays, a comics workshop with Marek Bennett on Thursday, June 27, a Wildlife Adventure with Squam Lakes Science Center on Monday, July 8, and a Cozy Campout stuffed animal sleepover on Monday, July 29.

    Brookline: In addition to Brookline Public Library’s (16 Main St., Brookline, 673-3330, brooklinelibrarynh.org) summer reading program, which begins Thursday, June 20, the Library will feature summer activities such as Table Game Mondays, a Teen Ice Cream Party on Friday, June 28, and Lego and Video Game Afternoons on Fridays. There are also passes for reduced entry to museums, parks and zoos.

    Candia: Smyth Public Library (55 High St., Candia, 483-8245, smythpl.org) will kick off its summer reading program with Our Amazing Butterflies, a presentation by Jerry Schneider, creator of the award-winning Butterfly Game, on Thursday, June 27. Other summer activities include tie-dying, a dog show and free summer concerts.

    Canterbury: The Elkins Public Library (9 Center Road, Canterbury, 783-4386, elkinspubliclibrary.org) will host the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire (childrens-museum.org) on Thursday, June 27, for Adventure all Around: Earth, Sea and Sky. The library will also have a nature scavenger hunt this summer, as well as story times and tumbling sessions for very small children.

    Chichester: The Chichester Town Library (161 Main St., Chichester, 798-5613, chichesternh.org/town-library) summer reading program starts on Saturday, June 22, with a magic show and free tote bags. Later in the summer there will be free concerts, and the Library has passes for discounts at family destinations like the Currier Art Museum, the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire, the USS Constitution and the Wright Museum.

    Concord: In addition to its summer reading program, which kicks off on Saturday, June 22, the Concord Public Library (45 Green St., Concord, 225-8670, concordnh.gov/1983/Library) has a summer of activities for children, including a hands-on Mad Science presentation, board game nights, Dungeons & Dragons for tweens, Lego sessions and story times, as well as passes to institutions like the New England Aquarium and the Museum of Fine Art.

    Deerfield: The Philbrick-James Library (4 Church St., Deerfield, 463-7187, philbrickjameslibrary.org) began its summer reading program Tuesday, June 18. Other summer activities will include Smokey Bear’s Reading Challenge, Veasey Park story times, drop-in fiber arts, a Lego club, PokeMondays and a tie-dye week.

    Derry: The Derry Public Library (64 E. Broadway, Derry, 432-6140, derrypl.org) kicked off its summer reading program this past Tuesday, June 18. Other summer activities for kids include a rodeo day, a pirate adventure day, bedtime stories, a magic show, a guided Walk Through Time, a glow party and more.

    Dunbarton: The Dunbarton Public Library (1004 School St., Dunbarton, 774-3546, dunbartonlibrary.org) summer reading program began Tuesday, June 18. In addition, the Library will offer a variety of summer activities, such as a reading to dogs program, storywalks, an open STEM/toy-making space and touch-a-truck activities.

    Epping: The Harvey-Mitchell Memorial Library (151 Main St., Epping, 734-4587, eppinglibrary.com) will host many children’s activities this summer, including a science/magic show on Friday, June 21; a puppet show; and a wildlife encounter with the Squam Lakes Natural Science Center. The Library’s summer reading program will take place during July.

    Epsom: The Epsom Public Library (1606 Dover Road, Epsom, 736-9920, epsomlibrary.com) will host drop-in STEAM events on Thursdays throughout the summer, as well as movie matinees, a fairy house-making workshop, a teddy bear sleepover, a 4-H babysitting class, wildlife encounters and more. The summer reading program will begin with a picnic on Saturday, June 29.

    Francestown: The George Holmes Bixby Memorial Library (52 Main St., Francestown, 547-2730, francestownnh.org/bixby-library) started its summer reading program last Saturday, June 15. There will be an ice cream social on Thursday, June 20. Contact the Library’s staff to learn more about upcoming kids’ events.
    Goffstown: The Goffstown Public Library (2 High St., Goffstown, 497-2102, goffstownlibrary.com) will host many children’s and teen activities throughout the summer, including a Pokemon Passion club, Legos, painting, tie-dying, reading with Candy the reading therapy dog, cooking, crafting, teen to-go projects and more.

    Hollis: The Hollis Social Library (2 Monument Square, Hollis, 465-7721, hollislibrary.org) summer reading program starts Saturday, June 22, with lawn games, water balloons and snow cones. Some of the other activities this summer include a henna tattoo workshop (Thursday, June 20), a puppet show, acrylic paint-by-numbers, beading classes, squirt gun painting, Legos, and a Charmingfare Farm petting zoo.

    Hooksett: The Hooksett Public Library (31 Mount St Mary’s Way, Hooksett, 485-6092, discover.hooksettlibrary.org) summer reading program starts Thursday, June 20, with a concert on the lawn with Mr. Aaron (mraaronmusic.com). Other activities for children and young adults this summer include a free Role Playing Game day, tie-dying, Legos, family movie nights, cooking classes and wildlife encounters.

    Hudson: The George H. and Ella M. Rodgers Memorial Library (194 Derry Road, Hudson, 886-6030, rodgerslibrary.org) started its summer reading program on June 15. Some summer activities to look forward to include Dungeons & Donuts, drop-in stitching sessions, teen candy bar bingo, a visit from the Silver Circus (andrewsilver.com), Dino the Therapy Dog, a tween Mario Kart tournament, and polymer clay classes for teens.

    Kingston: The Kingston Community Library (2 Library Lane, Kingston, 642-3521, kingston-library.org) will start its summer reading program Saturday, June 22, with a performance by Flying High Dogs (flyinghighdogs.com). Other summer events will include movies, a kids’ science club, storytimes with Jack the Dog, and a karate and reading adventure.

    Lee: The Lee Library (9 Mast Road, Lee, 659-2626, leelibrarynh.org) will kick off its summer reading program on Thursday, June 27, with music by Steve Blunt (steveblunt.com) and Marty Kelly. Other summer activities will include a British high tea, a Salad and Sandwich Social, clay crafts, wildlife encounters and more.

    Litchfield: The Aaron Cutler Memorial Library (269 Charles Bancroft Highway, Litchfield, 424-4044, acmlnh.blogspot.com) summer reading program starts on Tuesday, June 25. Other summer activities will include Fourth of July lantern crafts, beading, a tween Lego club, concerts on the lawn, an escape room, and a guiding eye dogs meet and greet.

    Londonderry: The Leach Library (276 Mammoth Road, Londonderry, 432-1127, londonderrynh.gov/leach-library) summer reading program began June 1 and will continue until Saturday, Aug. 31. Children and teens can look forward to a summer of learning to draw comics, crafts, a DIY spa day, movie matinees, a cupcake decorating contest, a potluck dinner and more.

    Loudon: The Maxfield Public Library (8 Route 129, Loudon, 798-5153, maxfieldlibrary.com) will kick off its summer reading program on Saturday, June 29, with a magic show by Jason Purdy (jasonpurdymagic.com). The Library will also have Music and Movement classes, a Lego club, “crafternoons,” summer storytimes, and an Evil Genius club.

    Manchester: The Manchester City Library (405 Pine St., Manchester, 624-6560, manchester.lib.nh.us) summer reading program began Monday, June 17. Other kids’ and teen events this summer include a gaming miniature painting class, a Black history walking tour and more.

    Merrimack: The Merrimack Public Library’s (470 DW Highway, Merrimack, 424-5021, merrimacklibrary.org) summer reading program begins Wednesday, June 26. Other summer events will include a baby and toddler summer kickoff, free concerts, storytimes, a Pokemon club, a summer Bluey party, Life-Size Monopoly, a Pokemon scavenger hunt, a shark party and more.

    Milford: The Wadleigh Memorial Library (49 Nashua St., Milford, 249-0645, wadleighlibrary.org) summer reading program began Friday, June 14. Children and teens can look forward to a teen murder mystery event, a scratch-off map making class, Big Truck Day, a giant paper airplane-making workshop, a Lego contest, a cryptozoology workshop, a police dog demonstration and much more.

    Mason: The Mason Public Library (16 Darling Hill Road, Mason, 878-3867, masonnh.us/library) will host Nature Adventure activities through July, including “Take a Tromp Through the Swamp,” star-gazing, recycled sounds, Smokey Bear’s birthday, and Claudia and Snoopy the Bunny.

    Mont Vernon: The Daland Memorial Library (5 N. Main St., Mont Vernon, 673-7888, dalandlibrary.com) began its summer reading program Tuesday, June 18, and it will run through Sunday, Aug. 4. Contact the Library’s staff for information about children’s activities this summer.

    Nashua: Nashua Public Library (2 Court St., Nashua, 589-4600, nashualibrary.org) begins its summer reading program Thursday, June 20. The library will hold many activities for children, tweens and teens over the summer, including sunprinting, topography and map-making, classic movie matinees, ukulele classes, a Taylor Swift party, culinary explorations, board game sessions, crystal mining and more.

    New Boston: The Whipple Free Library (67 Mont Vernon Road, New Boston, 487-3391, whipplefreelibrary.org) summer program began this past Monday, June 17. Summer activities for children and teens include a Teen Survivor Fun Night, a teen open mic night, movie matinees, a teen field trip to Canobie Lake Park, and karate for kids.

    Pelham: The Pelham Public Library (24 Village Green, Pelham, 635-7581, pelhampubliclibrary.org) will start its summer reading program on Wednesday, June 26, with a free concert and free ice cream. Other events include reading to a dog, storytimes, rocket ship crafting, candy bingo, treasure chests for kids and tweens, a magic show from Magic Fred the Magician (magicfredshow.com), and sand castle painting.

    Pembroke: The Pembroke Town Library (313 Pembroke St., Pembroke, 485-7851, pembroke-library.org) kicks off its summer reading program Wednesday, June 26, with ice cream and live entertainment with Miss Julianne (missjulieann.com). Other summer events include movie matinees, a STEAM club and family storytimes.

    Plaistow: The Plaistow Public Library (85 Main St., Plaistow, 382-6011, plaistowlibrary.com) began its summer reading program last Thursday, June 13. Other summer activities for children and teens include free movies, friendship bracelet-making, Dungeons & Dragons, hiking, yarn crafting, a production of Treasure Island, a puppet show and storytimes.

    Raymond: The Dudley-Tucker Library (6 Epping St., Raymond, 895-7057, raymondnh.gov/dudley-tucker-library) will kick off its summer reading program Monday, June 24, on the Town Common with live music by Steve Blunt (steveblunt.com). Other summer children’s events will include a Lego club, an origami class, storytimes, popcorn tastings and teen/tween game nights.

    Salem: The Kelley Library (234 Main St., Salem, 898-7064, kelleylibrary.org) began its summer reading program on Monday, June 17. Ask the Library’s staff for information about summer events for children and teens.

    Tilton: The Hall Memorial Library (18 Park St., Northfield, 286-8971, hallmemoriallibrary.org) summer reading program starts Monday, June 24. Ask the Library’s staff for information about summer events for children and teens.

    Warner: The Pillsbury Free Library (18 E. Main St., Warner, 456-2289, warner.lib.nh.us) will begin its summer reading program Tuesday, July 9. Ask the Library’s staff for information about summer events for children and teens.

    Wilton: The Wilton Public Library (7 Forest Road, Wilton, 654-2581, wiltonlibrarynh.org) summer reading program began Sunday, June 16. Ask the Library’s staff for more information about summer events for children and teens.

    Windham: The Nesmith Library (8 Fellows Road, Windham, 432-7154, nesmithlibrary.org) will begin its summer reading program Monday, June 24. Summer activities for kids and teens will include a comic workshop with Marek Bennett, chalk drawing, scavenger hunts, storytimes, Legos, craft and yoga nights for teens, a boba workshop, wildlife encounters and tween escape rooms.

    This Week 24/06/20

    Friday, June 21

    Head to Chunky’s (707 Huse Road, Manchester, 206-3888, chunkys.com) tonight at 8 p.m. for a night of live improv comedy as Manchester’s own Queen City Improv presents an evening of fun and laughs. The entire show is improvised on the spot using audience suggestions. This is a fast-paced evening filled with improv and music. Tickets cost $20 plus fees at chunkys.com.

    Saturday, June 22

    Join the Wilton Main Street Association for its annual Summerfest today starting at 10 a.m. and featuring an arts market, live music, food, street vendors, a pancake breakfast and a fireworks display in the evening. See visitwilton.com/summerfest.

    Saturday, June 22

    Plaistow’s Old Home Day returns today, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and will include local vendors on the Town Hall Green (145 Main St., Plaistow) as well as a beard contest, a baby contest, raffles, entertainment booths, a parade and more. This year’s theme is “Happy Birthday Plaistow!” to celebrate the town’s 275th anniversary. See Plaistow Old Home Day on Facebook.

    Saturday, June 22

    Don’t miss the annual Nashua Pride Festival, a free celebration of diversity, acceptance and fun focused on promoting equality, today from 2 to 6 p.m. in the parking lot of the Nashua Public Library (2 Court St.), starting with a parade at 2 p.m. Visit nashuanh.gov/1217/nashua-pride-festival.

    Saturday, June 22

    Operation Delta Dog is hosting “Full Tilt,” a lively pinball tournament, this evening at the Merrimack VFW (282 DW Highway., Merrimack, 424-7719) from 5:30 to 11 p.m. This is a family-frendly and competitive pinball tournament welcoming participants of all skill levels. Attendees will have the chance to showcase their pinball prowess, compete for prizes, enter raffles and enjoy the company of fellow pinball enthusiasts. Tickets start at $35 via operationdeltadog.org (click “Upcoming Events”). Proceeds will support Operation Delta Dog, which matches military veterans with dogs

    Saturday, June 22

    Today, the Abbot-Downing Historical Society will host the largest display of Concord Coaches in history at an open house at the Prescott Oil Co. (122 Airport Road, Concord, 225-5991) from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. There will be dozens of historical stage coaches, photo opportunities and a free lunch. Admission is free.

    Monday, June 24

    Help misunderstood dogs while playing 18 holes of golf. The 2024 Putts for Pups Golf Tournament will be held at the Stonebridge Country Club (195 Gorham Pond Road, Goffstown, 497-8633, golfstonebridgecc.com) today from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tickets are $135 per person at secondchanceranchrescue.com. All proceeds from the charity golf tournament help Second Chance Ranch Rescue, a small home-run nonprofit animal rescue.

    Save the Date! Saturday, June 29
    There will be a roller derby double-header at JFK Memorial Coliseum (303 Beech St., Manchester, 624-6444) from 5 to 9 p.m. as the New Hampshire Roller Derby League (nhrollerderby.com) has its first home games of the season. At 5 p.m. the NH Roller Derby All-Stars will take on the Aroostook Roller Derby BiohazARDs. At 7 p.m. the NH Roller Derby Cherry Bombs will skate against Roc City Roller Derby. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. and first whistle is at 5 p.m. Tickets will be sold at the door only, $12 for adults, free for kids 12 and younger and for veterans with military ID and NHRD vets.

    Featured photo: Courtesy Photo.

    Quality of Life 24/06/20

    Streaming now: a not quite empty nest

    Whit and Thor, this year’s brood of peregrine falcons from the nest at the top of the Brady-Sullivan building in Manchester, left the next two weeks ago, only to return home. On Sunday, June 9, Whit, the female fledgling, was observed via a live falcon-cam “fludging” — accidentally fledging. As she moved along the edge of the falcons’ nesting box, she slipped and fell. It was not so much a maiden flight as a plummet. She was not seen for several days, and it was feared that she had come to a bad end. Her brother Thor left the nest in a more deliberate manner the next morning. Since then, both fledglings have returned to the nesting box, and last Sunday, June 16, Whit was observed chasing her mother from the nest — all this according to the log for birds kept by regular viewers of the peregrine falcon cams.

    QOL score: +1

    Comment: See the log of falcon adventures at tinyurl.com/yck2pnka.

    Streaming now: Full nest

    According to a June 17 press release from the Loon Preservation Committee (loon.org), a pair of loons have laid an egg on a Live Loon Cam run by their organization. Footage from the Loon Cam, shows a family of loons nesting in the Lakes Region. “The first egg was laid on June 17,” the press release read, “and a second egg is expected to be laid between June 19 and 20. Hatch is expected to occur between July 14 and 15.” For the next 24 days, viewers can watch the live video feed, as the loons incubate their eggs and hatch their chicks.

    QOL Score: +1

    Comment: See the Loon Cam at loon.org/looncam.

    Ice cream for dinner week

    The National Weather Service, Gray, Maine, issued a Heat Advisory on Monday, June 16, that included the cities of Concord, Nashua and Manchester, effective on Tuesday, June 18. An Excessive Heat Watch was also issued, for Wednesday, June 19, and Thursday, June 20. Extreme heat and humid conditions were forecast with heat indices exceeding 100 degrees. Concord, Manchester and Nashua opened cooling stations. A press release from the Manchester Emergency Operations Center advised residents to wear sunblock and lightweight, loose-fitting clothing, to stay hydrated, and to stay in air-conditioned areas. Eversource also issued a press release June 16 saying, “While high electricity usage during a heat wave can put a strain on the electric system, the energy company is prepared to meet the increased demand and its crews are ready to respond to any outages or issues that may arise.”

    QOL Score:1 but last weekend was so nice!

    Comment: Too. Hot.

    Slightly better news at the pump

    According to the website GasBuddy.com, fuel prices in New Hampshire have dropped. A little. In a press release June 17, the fuel-price-tracking service announced that “average gasoline prices in New Hampshire have fallen 2.0 cents per gallon in the past week. Prices in New Hampshire are 15.9 cents per gallon lower than a month ago and stand 15.2 cents per gallon lower than a year ago. ”

    QOL score: +1

    Comment: The lowest price for gas in New Hampshire was $3.02 per gallon, compared to the national average of $3.41.

    Last week’s QOL score: 75

    Net change: +2

    QOL this week: 77

    What’s affecting your Quality of Life here in New Hampshire?

    Let us know at news@hippopress.com.

    C’s win NBA crown

    The Big Story – Celtics Win Banner 18: Well, despite their infuriating year-long capacity to blow big leads the Celtics delivered NBA title number 18 with a Game 5 106-88 win.

    Jaylen Brown was Finals MVP even though Jayson Tatum was better in the last two wins and Jrue Holiday actually should have won it.

    But most importantly it let them reclaim what they hold dearest, NBA title leader with 18.

    Sports 101: Name the Top 5 Hall of Famers to play the most playoff games without winning an NBA title.

    News Item – Red Sox Update: Nice week for the Red Sox in taking two of three from both the Phillies and the Yanks, who have the best two records in baseball. It had the Sox starting the week in third place at 37 up and 35 down with the Blue Jays and Reds on tap.

    News Item – Jerry West Dies: Saddest news in sports this week was the unexpected passing of the ever classy Mr. Clutch at 86, a guy who had a greater long-term influence than anyone in NBA history as a player, coach and executive.

    He was special to me because he and Oscar Robertson were the gold standard for guard play when I first became a basketball fan. And trust me, with all due respect to Kobe, Kobe Bryant was not better than West.

    He and Oscar don’t have the same number of titles because they played in the same era as Bill Russell and he hasn’t played in 50 years so how great he was is a bit lost as the memory dims over time.

    But, while his numbers were staggering, he was much more than that. As he also presided over two Lakers eras as GM that won eight titles before moving first to Memphis and as a special advisor in Golden State as it put together a team that won four more rings.

    So hail to the logo because you ain’t kidding when he is described as the GREAT Jerry West.

    RIP.

    News Item – Who’s Hot – Jarren Duran: According to Fastball on FanNation, with 20 doubles, 10 triples and 15 stolen bases through the Red Sox’ first 69 games Duran joined no less than baseball figures Ty Cobb (1911 and 1917) and Shoeless Joe Jackson (1912) as the only other left-handed batter to reach those three marks in fewer than 70 games since 1900.

    The Numbers:

    9 – led by Billy Hamilton’s three,franchise record stolen bases the Red Sox hung on the Yanks in Sunday’s 9-3 win.

    26 – after going yard at Fenway on Sunday, homers Aaron Judge has after 73 games in 2024 to put him on a pace close to 2022 when he hit an AL record 62.

    Of the Week Awards

    Thumbs Up – Dan Hurley: For once someone turned down getting the king’s ransom to not walk out on his guys because he was smart enough to know the grass on his side of the fence was green enough.

    Injury of the Week – Mookie Betts: Bad news for Mookie fans as broke his left hand when he was hit by a pitch batting against the Royals Sunday. It’s especially painful as he was in the midst of an MVP-caliber season while making a remarkable return to the infield for L.A. this time as a shortstop. No timetable given for his return, though the injury will require surgery.

    Alumni News Update – Kyle Schwarber: Those two homers he hit in the Phillies’ 4-1 series opener win vs. the Sox last week gave him 105 homers — 46 (2022), 47 (2023) and 15 so far this year — since John Henry and company refused to pay him the same money after 2021 that they gave to Masataka Yoshida, who hit 15 in Year 1 with the Sox while making Schwarber look like Barry Bonds in comparison when Yoshida was in left field.

    Sports 101 Answer: The Hall of Famers to play in the most playoff games without winning an NBA title are Karl Malone (193), John Stockton (182), Reggie Miller (144), Patrick Ewing (139) and Elgin Baylor (134).

    Final Thought – Tom Brady Goes Into Patriots Hall: Congratulations to young Tom for the honor along with the news his #12 will be retired. Also great to see that 100 teammates showed up for his inductions. That says something about what a great teammate and leader he was, though for those of us who saw him play that’s hardly a news flash.

    All of which is richly deserved.

    The best part for me, however, was seeing sincere emotional warmth between Brady and Coach B, who showed up to honor his QB despite the glacial relationship between him and ever petty owner Bob Kraft.

    And Brady couldn’t have gotten it more right when he said, “It wasn’t me. It wasn’t you. It was us,” adding, “Here in New England, it’s always about we, and us. Not me, or my.” Oh, for the good old days.

    Thanks for the memories, fellas.Email Dave Long at dlong@hippopress.com.

    Park for pups

    Manchester Dog Park seeks more members

    Samantha McKeon, the Vice President of Development of The Manchester Dog Park Association, a nonprofit organization that relies on the financial support of its members and donors to build and maintain off-leash dog parks in Manchester, spoke about the city’s only park, at 344 Second St. in Manchester, for its furriest residents. Find them on Facebook @ManchesterDogParkAssociation or email them at ManchesterDogParkAssociation@gmail.com.

    Can you give a brief history of the Manchester Dog Park?

    I’m a newer board member but the dog park was originally established by a small group of individuals in the city of Manchester. There was no public dog park so they started a nonprofit organization to raise funding and to work with the city to lease the land to create a dog park. The Association has been running it ever since. The land that the dog park is on was originally the blacksmith on Bass Island. Unfortunately, there was a fire there and the land, over time, got overrun by debris and trash. It really wasn’t visually appealing, so the city worked with the Association so that we could build the dog park there.

    If I wanted to go to the dog park, what would I need to do?

    In order to go to the dog park you do have to be a member. We have the applications to become a member on our Facebook page but we also have a link to our email where you can request an application…. Once that application has been completed, it’s just basic information about you and your dog. We also confirm that your dog is all up to date and registered in order to become a member, and then you’ll receive an email with a PIN for the padlock on the gate and then you use that PIN to enter the park. You’re supposed to go between dawn and dusk.

    Will the dog park stay members supported?

    I know that a lot of the community has been going to regular meetings to try to get the city to build a public dog park. I don’t know when that is going to happen, to be honest, but there is definitely a community push for it. We as an association are just trying to maintain this until that exists. The more sponsorships and memberships we receive the less we can have that membership fee be. Right now the $5 a month is to cover basic maintenance like insurance, poo poo bags, new sand, maintain the ramps, we’re building a water catchment system, so that’s what that $5 goes to….

    What can a new member expect if they show up to the dog park?

    Right now we have a small community of members but lots of tennis balls. My girl loves her tennis balls so I always make sure there’s a large volume of tennis balls available, Chuckit sticks, toys, A-frame, tunnel, catwalk, dog house. Right now I personally buy gallons of water to keep in our shelter for dog use, but we just ordered the supplies and are working to construct a water catchment system that will replace the water jugs…. The shelter is a little shed… where dogs and members can sit in there to get out of the sun. It’s like a little shaded area with benches and chairs…. We do have regulations against rope toys or bringing in human food into the dog park because it can lead to aggression behaviors, so that is against our rules.

    Why is it important to have a dog park in the city?

    I think it’s really imperative for dogs to have a place to play and socialize. Dogs are really social animals and they have a lot of energy and we’re in a really urban area where it’s hard to find a place for dogs to run and play and get that energy out, which is really important for their development. … For me, I have a German Shepherd. She has a lot of energy, so I have to take her to the dog park during my lunch breaks, daily, and I don’t have enough time during my lunch break to drive to Hooksett or Hudson, so it’s a perfect opportunity for me to have that time with my girl, let her run around, get her energy out, her zoomies, so that I can continue on with an undistracted workday.

    What are some steps people can take to help out the dog park?

    We do accept donations. We do have a sponsorship program for businesses in which businesses can give us a donation and we’ll hang a sign in our dog park to advertise the business. …You can email our nonprofit … ManchesterDogParkAssociation@gmail.com. —Zachary Lewis

    —Zachary Lewis

    Featured image: Courtesy photo.

    News & Notes 24/06/20

    Money for nonprofits

    According to a press release, more than $3.28 million was raised for a record-breaking 649 participating New Hampshire nonprofits through NH Gives, an online giving event created by the New Hampshire Center for Nonprofits, which involved around 13,500 people contributing to the drive between 5 p.m. on Tuesday, June 11, and 5 p.m. on Wednesday, June 12.

    NH Gives is an annual event that has raised more than $18 million for nearly 1,200 New Hampshire nonprofits since it was created in 2016, according to a press release.

    In a statement, Kathleen Reardon, CEO of the New Hampshire Center for Nonprofits, said, “A record number of nonprofits participated in this year’s event, and we’re grateful for the outpouring of support they experienced.”

    NHGives.org remained open for donations until midnight on Friday, June 14, and the giving total wound up to be more than $3.5 million, with more than 14,700 donors.

    Granite Staters contributed more than $1.3 million in matching funds for individual organizations to help spur donations this year.

    The New Hampshire Charitable Foundation, which has been a lead sponsor of NH Gives since 2016, contributed $40,000 in prizes to the organizations that garnered the highest number of unique online donors over the 24 hours. Our Place Housing Solutions for Adults with Developmental Disabilities, based in Dover, raised the most funds in the 24-hour period, with more than $51,852 in donations, the press release said, and The Cornucopia Project in Peterborough, which provides hands-on nutrition education to children in partnership with elementary schools, attracted the most individual donors, with 360 people contributing to support its mission. Visit NHGIVES.org.

    Excellent nursing

    Concord Hospital announced that Erin Maltais, RN, BSN, received the Excellence in Nursing Award in Emergency Nursing by the New Hampshire Nurses Association. The award was given at the Excellence in Nursing Awards reception on May 22 at the Grappone Conference Center in Concord.

    Nominees were selected by an independent panel of nursing leaders from Vermont, Maine and Massachusetts, according to the press release.

    “This is such a wonderful honor for Erin,” said Director of Nurse Operations Melissa Golightly, Concord Hospital – Laconia and Franklin. “I am honored to work alongside Erin, and we are truly fortunate to have her on our team, providing exceptional care to the patients in our community.”

    Maltais is a staff nurse and clinical lead in the emergency department at Concord Hospital – Laconia who began her career at the hospital in 2006 as a licensed nursing assistant in the geriatric psychiatric unit and later transitioned to the telemetry unit, where she served for nearly a decade, then spent a brief time in the intensive care unit. Her passion for emergency medicine eventually led her to the emergency department, where she humorously refers to herself as a “lifer,” the press release said.

    In a statement, Maltais said, “it is an honor to receive this award, and I am deeply humbled. As I reflect on my career, I remember why I chose nursing as my profession. It’s the compassion, the care, and the difference we make in people’s lives every day that drives me.”

    Moose hunt permits

    According to a press release, the winners and alternates of the 2024 New Hampshire Moose Hunt Lottery will be published on the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department’s website at wildnh.com/hunting/moose.html by noon on Friday, June 21, on the Department’s Facebook page.

    The large increase in web traffic on lottery day often causes downloading delays, according to the same release.

    A total of 33 moose hunting permits will be issued through the lottery in 2024, and as in previous years, winners will be selected through a computerized and random drawing, according to the release. New Hampshire’s 2024 moose hunt runs from Saturday, Oct. 19, to Sunday, Oct. 27. Visit huntnh.com/hunting/moose.html.

    Summer bike ride

    As they do every summer Wednesday, Queen City Bike Collective (qcbike.org) hosts a community trail ride from the start of the Rockingham Recreation Trail at 271 Mammoth Road in Manchester at 5:45 p.m. The ride is 10 to 15 miles of rail trail, fire roads, biking trails and dirt roads, according to the website, which said any hybrid or mountain bike will work. The ride is open to all abilities, with an option to grab food and drinks near the end. See the website or contact Elyza at elizyaagosta@mail.com for details about the ride.

    Every two weeks the Collective also hosts a longer group ride ranging from 15 to 50 miles, with stops at local coffee shops according to the website. The next ride is slated for Sunday, July 7, starting at 10 a.m

    Get ready for this year’s New Hampshire Senior Games! The first local event, a candlepin bowling tournament, is happening at Boutwell’s Bowling Center in Concord (152 N. State St.) on Friday, June 21, at 1 p.m. More events are scheduled to take place in July and August, covering disc golf, archery, basketball, swimming, racquetball, table tennis, badminton, pickleball and more. See nhseniorgames.org.

    The Brown Bag Book Club at Manchester City Library (405 Pine St.) will be discussing The Wager: A Tale of Shipwreck, Mutiny and Murder by David Grann on Tuesday, June 25, at 12:15 p.m. The book describes a group of shipwrecked British sailors in the late 1700s returning to England with tales of heroism and survival until a month later another group of men from the same ship returns claiming the first group were murderous mutineers. Call 624-6550, ext. 7620, or visit manchester.lib.nh.us.

    Breeze Airways celebrated its inaugural flight from Manchester-Boston Regional Airport on May 14. The airline will offer non-stop flights to Charleston, S.C., and Orlando, Florida, with Tampa International Airport and Southwest Florida International Airport in Fort Myers in the fall, according to a post on MHT’s Facebook page.

    Kids’ Guide to Summer — 6/20/2024

    Woo-hoo, school’s out! So how are you going to fill those days until the kids head back to class? We present our annual Kids’ Guide to Summer, with a look at fairs, concerts, theater, sports, library happenings and more goings-on to entertain kids this summer.

    Also on the cover Concord holds its annual downtown celebration Market Days this Thursday, June 20, through Saturday, June 22, featuring kid fun as well as live music, food, brews and more (page 22). Hollis celebrates one of the sweetest parts of June with its annual Strawberry Festival on Saturday (page 28). And get live music tonight, whichever night you’re reading this, at an area restaurant or brewery — see the Music This Week listings on page 37.

    A graphic the shape of the state of New Hampshire, filled in with the New Hampshire flag made up of the crest of New Hampshire on a blue field.
    Money for nonprofits According to a press release, more than $3.28 million was raised for a record-breaking 649 participating New ...
    Dog wearing sweater laying down
    Manchester Dog Park seeks more members Samantha McKeon, the Vice President of Development of The Manchester Dog Park Association, a ...
    Photo of assorted sports equipment for football, soccer, tennis, golf, baseball, and basketball
    The Big Story – Celtics Win Banner 18: Well, despite their infuriating year-long capacity to blow big leads the Celtics ...
    A graphic the shape of the state of New Hampshire, filled in with the New Hampshire flag made up of the crest of New Hampshire on a blue field.
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    roller derby competition
    Friday, June 21 Head to Chunky’s (707 Huse Road, Manchester, 206-3888, chunkys.com) tonight at 8 p.m. for a night of ...
    Market Days in Concord
    Now that school is out, it’s time to get serious about having big summer fun. Looking for places to go ...
    Jersey Boys
    Jersey Boys at Winnipesaukee Playhouse By Michael Witthausmwitthaus@hippopress.com Along with being a jukebox musical about a great American vocal group, ...
    The latest from NH’s theater, arts and literary communities • Curtain calls: The Palace Theatre’s (80 Hanover St. in Manchester; ...
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    Find fun for everyone in the family at Concord’s annual Market Days By Zachary Lewiszlewis@hippopress.com The 50th annual Market Days ...
    Family fun for whenever Summer party • The YMCA of Downtown Manchester will host its Rock the Block event on ...
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    News from the local food scene • On the grill: The Concord Food Co-Op (24 S. Main St. in Concord, ...
    Buckets full of strawberries
    Strawberry Sunday in Hollis By John Fladdjfladd@hippopress.com If you had to feed more than 1,000 guests, what would it take? ...
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    I don’t have to tell you that this Saturday, June 22, is National Kissing Day. You’ve been stocking up on ...
    album cover left: A piece of artwork on brown paper that reads Trains at the bottom Artwork on right: Man standing in room lit by red light
    J.M. Clifford, Trains, Thinkin’ and Drinkin’ (Brooklyn Basement Records) You know, a lot of people think they don’t like any ...
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    Our Kindred Creatures, by Bill Wasik and Monica Murphy (Knopf, 374 pages) With the notable exception of factory farms, cruelty ...
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    The puberty alarm goes off and suddenly Riley’s mind is a construction zone with new emotions in Inside Out 2, ...
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    Jon Anderson recreates ’70s era with new group By Michael Witthausmwitthaus@hippopress.com On June 13, Jon Anderson & the Band Geeks ...

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